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Old 12-08-2010, 04:32 PM   #1
Snowgoose
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If you had to pick one time....

Following on from the "If you had to pick one place" thread.... and from numerous discussions of blackflies... when would be the best time to come and paddle the Adirondacks?

This is bearing in mind a round trip of several thousand miles...
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Old 12-08-2010, 04:48 PM   #2
Cory D
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During peak foliage of course. If you can avoid the crowded areas that is. Say early to mid October.
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Old 12-08-2010, 05:16 PM   #3
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I have been there 2 times in early September and all the places I paddled were devoid of crowds. Last year I went up in August and as expected there were many more people especially on Rollins Pond from the campground but those people tend to stay close to home.

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Old 12-08-2010, 06:34 PM   #4
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Cory D's Got It Right!

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During peak foliage of course. If you can avoid the crowded areas that is. Say early to mid October.
When I retire (soon), I will be renting a cottage on Cranberry Lake for the entire month of each October, and pigging out on pleasure paddling.

Mike
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Old 12-08-2010, 06:56 PM   #5
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When I retire (soon), I will be renting a cottage on Cranberry Lake for the entire month of each October, and pigging out on pleasure paddling.

Mike
As most motorboaters on CL do, I will give you a wide berth and invite you for coffee! How many days or are you not that close yet?

Any clues as to where you want to rent?
I might have a few leads as you get closer....
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Old 12-08-2010, 06:57 PM   #6
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i was going to suggest either side of the last full moon of september myself... still warm enough to enjoy it, cool enough to sleep well, no bugs.
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:09 PM   #7
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For others, I'd say from mid-September to mid-October. How about that little few week long slot between mud season and blackfly season?

That said, I'm one of the fortunate ones who can largely ignore blackflies, and I've got to say that's a wonderful time - the emerging leaves are that bright, fresh green, warblers are everywhere, and the fishing is usually the best it will be all year.

So, speaking for myself, and myself alone, I'd say blackfly season from mid-May to mid-June!
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:15 PM   #8
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For others, I'd say from mid-September to mid-October. How about that little few week long slot between mud season and blackfly season?

That said, I'm one of the fortunate ones who can largely ignore blackflies, and I've got to say that's a wonderful time - the emerging leaves are that bright, fresh green, warblers are everywhere, and the fishing is usually the best it will be all year.

So, speaking for myself, and myself alone, I'd say blackfly season from mid-May to mid-June!

I am assuming you have Naugahyde for skin? Lucky you!
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:25 PM   #9
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Definitely mid September to Mid October.
The bugs are gone, the temperatures are ideal, the water is still warm, the trees can be magnificent, and it is generally the driest time of the year.
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:32 PM   #10
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We spend 2 weeks every year the later part of September into early October hiking & paddling. It is the high point of the year! Often the water is still warm enough to enjoy a quick swim and the leaves are usually gorgeous. Generally after Labor Day and before Columbus Day and mid week if you can do it would be our recommendation. We have always said we'd like to work 10 months a year and play in September & October..... someday!
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Old 12-08-2010, 08:44 PM   #11
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For others, I'd say from mid-September to mid-October. How about that little few week long slot between mud season and blackfly season?

That said, I'm one of the fortunate ones who can largely ignore blackflies, and I've got to say that's a wonderful time - the emerging leaves are that bright, fresh green, warblers are everywhere, and the fishing is usually the best it will be all year.

So, speaking for myself, and myself alone, I'd say blackfly season from mid-May to mid-June!
Mid May to mid June too for me. The summer people have not arrived, and you pretty much can have the place to yourself.

Blackflies don't stop me. I live in the Maine woods and they are here too. So it doesn't matter one iota.

curiously the blackflies were still here in September and they forgot that last hatch is supposed to be sterile. They were still biting.
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Old 12-09-2010, 09:56 AM   #12
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Here's another vote for fall. The water's warmer than early spring, our skills are honed by a season afloat and the hills are ablaze with color. On the other hand, campsites are picked clean of firewood, but we all cook on stoves for environmental reasons anyway.

One can run the fall thing too late in the season. If you paddled to Eagle Island yesterday, you'd be having a second cup of coffee while contemplating a solidly frozen Lower Saranac Lake, maybe wondering if you had provisions to last comfortably until the ice becomes thick enough to toboggan your boat to a launch site.

~ Noonish on 09: Not so dire! Crescent Bay is iced but the wind opened the North center up from Eagle over to KnollWood. Maybe I'll get out again!

Evening, 10th: Iced solid again, thick enough to be daunting to chip through to get a bubbler in. April it is!

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Old 12-09-2010, 06:37 PM   #13
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I prefer right after ice out up until ice in....after that it pretty much sucks..(for paddlin')...

Then I gotta put on them damn snowshoes & skiis & make the best of things....(I hate long johns)

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Old 12-10-2010, 11:57 AM   #14
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Pick One Time

Because I love to swim I go towards the late summer. I did go after Labor Day once and it was really cold (bad luck I guess). Now that i have kids this is not an option so I go the week before Labor Day. Over the years I have noticed that the crowds thin out considerably; you do need to leave by the Friday before Labor day.
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Old 12-10-2010, 12:38 PM   #15
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For a 1000 mile trip, I'd say fall, between Labor Day and Columbus Day. Backcountry use drops off some from it's summer levels after Labor Day, and is pretty much restricted to weekends. The weekends will still be a little bit busy, but on such a trip you'll be out on a lot more week days than weekend days, and you should have most paddling areas pretty much to yourself on those days.

You wouldn't have to worry about the bugs, either. By early or mid August, they are usually pretty much gone, and to see any in September or early October is rare.

After Columbus Day, paddling and hiking activity plummets in the Adirondacks, but so too do the temperatures (both in the air and in the water).
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Old 12-10-2010, 07:55 PM   #16
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After Columbus Day

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After Columbus Day, paddling and hiking activity plummets in the Adirondacks, but so too do the temperatures (both in the air and in the water).
Paddling activity does indeed immediately plummet; air temperatures may plummet, depending on the year; however, the water temperatures, follow a much less steep decline - and it's the best time of all to paddle up here in the North Country!

In the spring, you've got potentially high air temps (e.g. 70 degrees plus F); and Cranberry Lake, like many other spots, including the St. Lawrence River, can be running a "toasty" 38 degrees F or lower.

I choose to wear a drysuit in both seasons.

Mike
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Old 12-10-2010, 08:30 PM   #17
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thinking out of the box

The time I'd like to be paddling is around the the year 1880. I might have chosen an earlier time, but canoes and guideboats were very heavy before then, when Rushton was perfecting his lightweight boat building techniques. These boats were made famous at the time by "Forest and Stream" magazine, and of course the travels and writings of Nessmuk. Wouldn't it be great, as a person with reasonable means of the time, to experience the Adirondacks for about a year. I think the onslaught of "Murray's Fools", those city-folk running through the woods at about the same time, couldn't compare to the weekend crowds of today.
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Old 12-11-2010, 07:58 AM   #18
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Here is one tool that I have used to get an idea of what the weather conditions will be like in a certain time frame.

http://www.wunderground.com/tripplanner/index.asp
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Old 12-12-2010, 12:46 PM   #19
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The time I'd like to be paddling is around the the year 1880......
I wonder if you might come close to that experience by being flown into a carefully selected location in Canada.
b
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Old 12-12-2010, 05:23 PM   #20
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I wonder if you might come close to that experience by being flown into a carefully selected location in Canada.
b
Would rather pack in to better preserve the imagery of isolation than to fly in.

Actually, when studying the maps before paddling 1000 miles of the Yukon River, I noted many potential routes calling me yet deeper into the wilderness. Hundreds of miles of tributaries far from even the sparse First Nation settlements on the big river. Uncountable numbers of isolated lakes beyond an equal number of unnamed high ridges and deep passes. I do plan to go back to race the Yukon again. I'll just have to wait for yet another day when I will take my leisure time on an exploratory trip.
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