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Old 12-10-2012, 03:37 PM   #1
Holdstrong
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Avoiding traps during trapping season?

I always have a hard time deciphering the information on the DEC website. It seems like there are a dozen different types of hunting and trapping seasons, for a dozen different species, across a dozen different areas of the state, all with different dates.

I am hoping the folks who read this sub forum can help me with that.

When exactly is trapping season in the Adirondacks? Especially the High Peaks area?

In addition to knowing the dates, I am also hoping you can provide some advice on avoiding the actual traps themselves.

I hike and walk with my dogs. I'd love to avoid areas that are likely to be trapped, but since I am not a trapper... I have absolutely no idea where those areas might be. And unlike during hunting season, it is not like I can put an orange vest on the pups and trust that a hunter will not shoot them.

Since traps are indiscriminate, how would you advise someone reduce the possibility of their pet getting injured or killed in one? I recognize the only way to eliminate that possibility is to stay the heck out of the woods during trapping season... but that is less than ideal since I can't seem to pinpoint those dates with any confidence, and since I'd like to enjoy the woods this time of year too.
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Old 12-10-2012, 03:51 PM   #2
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As a person who hikes regularly with a very active dog (a hunting spaniel) I worry about that myself. I know one place we Pheasant hunt people also trap as well which I didn't realize until we ran into a trapper there one day, A chill ran up my spine while we were talking! So far in 20 plus years we have never had an incident, lucky maybe!
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:40 PM   #3
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In the Adirondacks, "land" furbearer season ends today. Water furbearers - Beaver and otter remains open until April 7 and muskrat and mink are open until April 15. Most sets for these animals will be in the water or under ice.

Go to the DEC's website to learn about trapping regulations. You may also want to talk to a local trapper to learn more about it or contact the NYSTA for someone in your area that can show you first hand as to what it's all about.

Alpine1 it sounds like you and the trapper at the pheasant preserve missed a good opportunity for educating each other.
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:47 PM   #4
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A chill ran up my spine while we were talking! So far in 20 plus years we have never had an incident, lucky maybe!
Maybe not as lucky as you think - maybe the trapper was doing everything possible to avoid incidents with hunters and their dogs (it's a hunting preserve). Sounds like a person that I want to promote trapping to all kinds of folks.
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:48 PM   #5
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I wouldn't worry too much about traps in the High Peaks, especially in the more popular areas. Generally, the more popular a trail is with hikers, the less popular it is with the hunting and trapping crowd.

Distance from the road is also a good indication of how likely an area is to have traps- as with hunting, generally, the further you get from a road, the less likely it is that there will be traps in the area. In my experience, most trapping occurs within a mile of a road (same as with hunting).
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Old 12-10-2012, 04:52 PM   #6
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A very real concern. I have had 2 of my dogs caught in coyote traps, one in Pa. and one in ADKs. Luckily both (English Springer Spaniel and Miniature Poodle) came away from the experience with no permanent harm. Both traps were set a few feet off of the trail and just a few hundred feet off of the access road..

The extreme pain and suffering an animal goes through, when seen up close and in person, is quite disturbing to say the least.

In both cases I was able to pry the traps open within a couple of minutes after figuring how the damned mechanism works.

Obviously I am not the person who will advise you on avoidance.
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Old 12-10-2012, 05:06 PM   #7
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Maybe not as lucky as you think - maybe the trapper was doing everything possible to avoid incidents with hunters and their dogs (it's a hunting preserve). Sounds like a person that I want to promote trapping to all kinds of folks.
Actually your right. "Lucky" may not have been the case in the instance I used. Although it was not a "private" hunting preserve, it was a NYS release site which the trapper was aware of as well so he probably was using caution that I was then unaware of In any case I'm sure we've been in many an area that trappers use and more than 1 mile from roads. You might be surprised Brendon where avid trappers and hunters roam
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Old 12-10-2012, 05:08 PM   #8
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Actually your right. "Lucky" may not have been the case in the instance I used. Although it was not a "private" hunting preserve, it was a NYS release site which the trapper was aware of as well so he probably was using caution that I was then unaware of In any case I'm sure we've been in many an area that trappers use and more than 1 mile from roads. You might be surprised Brendon where avid trappers and hunters roam
I don't doubt that there are hunters and trappers that travel further into the woods. I've encountered hunters in some pretty remote places myself. But I stand by my point- the majority of hunting and trapping occurs quite close to road.

Obviously, safety should be a consideration regardless of where you are when it's that time of year, though.
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:36 PM   #9
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As a former trapper I can tell you trappers do all then can to avoid catching non target animals. Not only do we not want to catch your pet, we don't want to spend alot of time catching animals that bring no money and render the traps useless until boiled again. Such is the case when catching skunks and oppossums (not to mention your dog or cat) while you are fox and coyote trapping.
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:42 PM   #10
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As a former trapper I can tell you trappers do all then can to avoid catching non target animals. Not only do we not want to catch your pet, we don't want to spend alot of time catching animals that bring no money and render the traps useless until boiled again. Such is the case when catching skunks and oppossums (not to mention your dog or cat) while you are fox and coyote trapping.
Are you familiar with Coyote trapping and how it's done? I know several in this area whom trap them and are very successful. Since they'd be using a leg hold? trap on the ground keeping pets from danger must be tricky.
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Old 12-10-2012, 06:52 PM   #11
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Trapping has gotten a bad rap forever...

Leghold traps are LIVE traps that usually result in very minor injuries to the trapped animal.It is myth that aniimals chew their legs off trying to escape.Most animals caught in legholds,land traps, can be released without lasting harm.Of course there will be exceptions posted, that I have never seen in real life.Most catches are actually caught by the foot, not the leg.

If your dog/cat is caught in an leghold it is rather easy to release.. Just open the trap jaws....While setting traps I have sprung them on my hands and it no big deal...a little bruising but NO damage..24 or 48 hour rule to check traps.


In NYS their are NO traps with teeth... that is a fantasy by the antis...

Water traps are a different story,Those traps are called conibears and are made for a quick kill of a beaver,otter,mink.... UNDERWATER<<<<


Conibears, in smaller sizes are used on land, but dogs and cats do not fit in them...so they are safe.

Trapping is a very useful management tool,it also is a money maker for many folks. NYS is one of the biggest producers of wild fur in the country.

http://www.nystrappers.org/
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Old 12-10-2012, 07:41 PM   #12
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Are you familiar with Coyote trapping and how it's done? I know several in this area whom trap them and are very successful. Since they'd be using a leg hold? trap on the ground keeping pets from danger must be tricky.
Yes I'm familiar with coyote trapping and never caught a dog while trapping coyotes. In my early days of fox trapping I caught a few dogs until I learned how to avoid them. I've caught a total of three dogs in the 10 plus years I trapped. All three dogs were release unharmed no broken bones no chewed paws. Two of the dogs had collars and I notified the owners. One of those dogs was 5 miles from its home the other was 2 miles. Both dogs were running free and not ingaged in some type of hunting or training, which by the way is not legal on lands inhabited by deer. I worried more about people than pets. If I do my job the chances of me catching your dog are slim. But the human factor is if some people think there is a trapper in the area they start looking for the traps and contaminate the whole area. As said in a later post the leg hold trap really is a foot hold trap. Some are actually caught by a toe. Regardless of what they are caught by no one wants to catch your pet.
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Old 12-10-2012, 08:22 PM   #13
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Yes I'm familiar with coyote trapping and never caught a dog while trapping coyotes. In my early days of fox trapping I caught a few dogs until I learned how to avoid them. I've caught a total of three dogs in the 10 plus years I trapped. All three dogs were release unharmed no broken bones no chewed paws. Two of the dogs had collars and I notified the owners. One of those dogs was 5 miles from its home the other was 2 miles. Both dogs were running free and not ingaged in some type of hunting or training, which by the way is not legal on lands inhabited by deer. I worried more about people than pets. If I do my job the chances of me catching your dog are slim. But the human factor is if some people think there is a trapper in the area they start looking for the traps and contaminate the whole area. As said in a later post the leg hold trap really is a foot hold trap. Some are actually caught by a toe. Regardless of what they are caught by no one wants to catch your pet.
I don't worry about the dog getting caught, he is a hunter by nature, he needs to understand what's right and wrong. He's a bigger danger to himself with the speed and strength he using going through the woods or fields than probably any trap If he were to be caught by a trap I'd be close by to help at least where leg hold traps are used.

As kids (70's) our neighbors were trappers and i have several friends that trap today. I don't have a problem with trappers, rather the opposite.
I was wondering how a set was made that did not entice a dog.
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Old 12-10-2012, 08:40 PM   #14
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In my early days of fox trapping I caught a few dogs until I learned how to avoid them. I've caught a total of three dogs in the 10 plus years I trapped.
I don't know a lot of people who trap, but every one I've ever talked to has a story similar to this. It makes sense... you have to learn how to trap, and part of that learning is figuring out how to avoid non-target animals.

Combine that with the abundance of stories I've heard over the years like the ones Poconoron tells above, and I'd just assume that my pets do not become a learning experience for some new (or bad) trapper.

I'd prefer to not be chased from the woods because of this, but it seems like there is no reliable way to know for sure where this is taking place...

So I guess I'm back to trying to figure out exactly WHEN it takes place.

According to this link, it seems like trapping in one form or another can take place all the way through April: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/45551.html

If so, I guess my questions to those with knowledge or experience doing this is... are there certain seasons in particular that should be avoided? It would seem to make sense that traps set for coyotes would be the ones most likely to catch a dog. If so, I'd simply avoid that season. But I don't want to risk the health or life of my dog based on an assumption about a topic I know so little about.
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:49 PM   #15
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Once Caught A Bloodhound

Back in the 1960's I was running a trapline for fisher off Sagamore Road south of Raquette Lake Village. Coincidently, I had also been working very closely with the New York State Troopers S&R team looking for a lost hunter off the same road. It was during that search that one of the troopers bloodhounds stepped in one of my traps on an old tote road. The trooper checked the name tag on the trap and later that day told me what had happened. Fortunately the dog was on a leash and stood still, allowing the trooper to release him from the trap. No harm done, but embarassing to say the least. Needless to say until the hunter was found, I pulled my traps.
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Old 12-10-2012, 11:28 PM   #16
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You might be surprised Brendon where avid trappers and hunters roam
True that. You just wait till some wiseass marten tries some crap with me in the High Peaks. I'm waiting. Its only a matter of time really as I see it. Then it will be Marten Elimination Mode, or MEM for short.

120 conibears and newspaper delivery tubes are easy to carry a bunch of. You can set a bunch of paper tube "Marten Surprises" that way for the Marten Population Control Program(tm), or MPCP.

Its not like I've thought about it at all though or have any type of plans to play god with the marten population if they piss me off or anything like that.


Edit: I found a link to a fella that has a pretty good Marten Surprise recipe. Enjoy.

http://trappingtoday.com/index.php/c...y/marten-sets/
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Last edited by Commissionpoint; 12-11-2012 at 12:07 AM.. Reason: Added Link
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Old 12-10-2012, 11:57 PM   #17
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CP , Atwell is gonna haunt you


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Old 12-11-2012, 12:08 AM   #18
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Looks like Atwell would make a decent hat.
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Old 12-11-2012, 12:37 AM   #19
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Some info from Adirondack Life: Dogs and Trapping Season
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Old 12-11-2012, 09:42 AM   #20
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Holdstrong - In the ADK, the upland furbearer trapping season (fox, fisher, coyote, weasel, raccoon, etc.) opened in late October and ended yesterday. The only trapping now in the ADK is for water animals, and nearly all sets will be in the water or under the ice.

Bottom line - You shouldn't avoid the woods with your dog during fall season. It's the best time to be out in the woods.
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