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Old 06-23-2020, 07:23 PM   #1
Cold River Bob
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Brook trout reading

Check this out I thought you might like to read this

https://www.adirondackexplorer.org/s...-rain-recovery
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Old 06-24-2020, 06:41 AM   #2
Adironzach
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I was very happy to see them halting stocking in certain ponds. If we find a self sustaining population of brook trout, we need to leave them be and not dilute the genetics with hatchery fish.
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Old 06-24-2020, 09:29 AM   #3
adkfishing
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I agree - anything that is left that can sustain naturally reproducing trout shouldn't be mentioned or stocked. Glad to see that some of the ponds are making a comeback though from the acid rain. Hopefully it will continue to improve!
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Old 06-24-2020, 12:58 PM   #4
Stillhunter
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I think it is great to see if these 13 ponds will become self sustaining but another reason that the stocking had to be discontinued somewhere in the pond system is the fact that the Rome hatchery was contaminated by zebra muscles and the trout were just not available. A reduction had to happen somewhere. That is probably an underlying factor behind this feel good PR story. These 13 ponds do not have heritage fish but their water quality may allow past hybrid stocked trout to spawn.
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Old 06-24-2020, 05:01 PM   #5
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Unfortunately warming temperatures may hurt what lack of acid rain helped.
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Old 06-25-2020, 06:32 AM   #6
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I find it funny that the article says nothing of the contribution beaver make to the warming of trout stream waters ? Here on Tug Hill the beaver damming of tributaries of Salmon River and the East Branch of Fish Creek have almost single handedly destroyed the Native Brook Trout populations in these creeks and brooks, by flooding the forest and destroying the shade integrity. I guess it’s not PC to place any blame on the beaver ?
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Old 06-25-2020, 07:10 AM   #7
St.Regis
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Beavers aren't worth enough now for most trappers to target them, unless they do it as nusiance work with reasonable pay. Everthing about beaver trapping is hard work. I don't see the beaver population doing anything other than increasing
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Old 06-25-2020, 10:34 AM   #8
Glen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by St.Regis View Post
Beavers aren't worth enough now for most trappers to target them, unless they do it as nusiance work with reasonable pay. Everthing about beaver trapping is hard work. I don't see the beaver population doing anything other than increasing
Brook trout co-existed with beavers for 10,000 years. Was the presence of wolves a check on their population? Serious question.
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Once there were brook trout in the streams in the mountains. They smelled of moss in your hand. On their backs were vermiculate patterns that were maps of the world in its becoming. Maps and mazes. Of a thing which could not be put back. Not be made right again. In the deep glens where they lived all things were older than man and they hummed of mystery.
― Cormac McCarthy
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Old 06-25-2020, 03:17 PM   #9
Woodly
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Brook trout co-existed with beavers for 10,000 years. Was the presence of wolves a check on their population? Serious question.
Was the climate/water cooler then?
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Old 06-25-2020, 04:29 PM   #10
St.Regis
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Brook trout co-existed with beavers for 10,000 years. Was the presence of wolves a check on their population? Serious question.
Yes on wolves, but I think coyotes filled a chunk of that niche. Reintroductions, protections, and land use/vegetation changes from farms to forests allowed the beaver population to increase dramatically
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Old 06-25-2020, 05:20 PM   #11
Tug Hill
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According to the NYS Forest Fish and Game Commission Reports for 1902-03, there were only 2 known beaver colonies left in NY State. Somewhere in the Town of Webb, Herkimer County. I’d be willing to bet the Native Brook trout fishing was very good then ?

Correct me if I’m wrong but the state acquired beaver and turned them loose around the state in the 30’s. In the 50’s the core of Tug Hill was still pretty much beaver free. During the 60’s the beaver population on the Hill exploded. Trapping pressure was high up until the late 80’s. But the beaver damage to free flowing small brooks and creeks had already been done. Most of the upper reaches of former teaming Native Brook trout streams on the Hill today like Pickens, Finnegan, Smith, Keese, Crooked, Prince, Pringle, Alder, Roaring, Broad, Mud, Brooks, and the east and west forks of the Salmon River, and the list goes on, are now nothing more than open beaver vlyes/meadows with stagnant beaver ponds.

The good news is beaver castor gland prices are at an all time high, coupled with the pelt price it is getting beaver trappers back into the field. The bad news is, the shade integrity is destroyed and many Brooks are no longer free flowing. Even if the beaver were totally removed , it would take decades for the habitat to recover. By then all those unique Native Brook trout strains that once inhabited those streams, most likely will be lost forever. If not already?
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:38 PM   #12
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State Politics and New York's Beavers - - The Adirondack Almanack
https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2...s-beavers.html
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Old 07-12-2020, 07:36 PM   #13
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Can someone help me understand the life cycle of adirondack brook trout please...or provide a good link? How do they end up in lakes, what do they eat etc...

I have limited knowledge, but in my experience in a good backcountry ponds or lakes I've seen lots of water salamanders and obviously a ton of black flies. What do these guys eat...how do beavers hurt their habitat?

I find this conversation about brook trout very interesting...curious what the path forward will be. Obviously many of these strains are lost forever but what is the best scenario for some of these adirondack water bodies going forward that have lost them but are now potentially able to host fish?

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Old 07-13-2020, 10:42 AM   #14
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Look up Habitat Suitability Index model for brook trout by the USFWS
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