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Old 03-12-2022, 12:26 PM   #81
Wldrns
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My first stove was some sort of bulky Primus my father gave me from long ago. One day when I was too young for such a trip I rode my heavy 3 speed bike 25 miles to the next town and stopped along the way to heat a can of beans on that stove. Arriving at the town with an outdoor gear store, the clerk was so impressed with my trek that she gave me for free my choice of any one of the fishing lures I was looking at. The local cop warned me to not ride my bike on the sidewalk, which I was not doing anyway.

Other than that, my first real stove purchase was the old blue Optimus 8R, which I carried on many backpacking trips. It was surely more convenient and cleaner than making a campfire every day, especially since I practically never stayed at a well used campsite with a designated firepit. I added an external pump to help pressurize the tank and that worked very well to increase the flame.

Eventually I hopped on the Whisperlite wagon, good for cold wx, but I never liked it very much because it was too difficult to control the heat or to safely simmer a pot of anything without burning.

A scouting friend introduced me to Trangia and alcohol, and that had me hooked as my goto stove kit for many years, with its ability to control the heat with a flapper cover. it even has a preheater for use in cold weather. I still use it some to this day. Scouts tended to promote and use a the Coleman sportster model gray or green canister stove (it was considered "safer" than MSR models at the time), so of course I had to get one of those too, but I liked my Trangia much more.

I then needed something else to use while paddling on the Yukon races and another newmulti-fuel Primus went with me for heating water to rehydrate meals while still race paddling in the voyageur canoe. It worked but I did not like it very much. I also tried a couple of different sizes of Kelly Kettles. They work really well for quickly boiling water for rehydrating meals, but they can only boil water. I concocted a holder to place a small pot holder on top of the chimney to capture wasted heat, but the KK boils water so quickly that there is not enough time to use the chimney heat to do anything else before the water all boils out.

Amazon sent me a deal for only a couple of bucks to get a tiny Chinese stove burner that uses canister fuel. Cheap and light and foldable. I do like that style and also have a couple of much beefier better built burners, and even bought an adapter that uses large green propane canisters for fuel. I use these mostly only on canoe trips where I do not have to backpack a load very far, and of course this style does not work well in colder weather.
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Old 03-12-2022, 12:43 PM   #82
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I also use a Trangia, and really like it due its ability to adjust heat, and hold a steady heat, unlike a pressurized stove which changes as it loses pressure and constantly needs to be fussed with. Cannisters are pretty good for simmering, but again, have their disadvantages.

I'm the same with wood - I'll use my alky stove if I'm not near a good fire ring. Most of the time I am though, and I'll often stop at a vacant campsite to rest or eat lunch. And typically if I'm lugging around wood, it's to a well visited site.
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Old 03-12-2022, 01:13 PM   #83
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https://clikstand.com/shop_sierra_combo/

that setup is quite good. You can get much cheaper stuff but the windscreen actually does work.
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Old 03-12-2022, 04:47 PM   #84
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I picked up an MSR a few years ago and it's my go-to for coffee & other times when I want to heat some water ASAP. Not great for cooking!
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Old 03-13-2022, 08:26 AM   #85
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I have a Trangia alcohol stove that I will also occasionally use. I like the versatility offered by the simmer ring and the primer tray (making it easier to light the stove in shoulder season conditions). It does have noticeably longer cook times, however... not always an issue but sometimes I want food/hot water now and it can be frustrating having to wait.

A number of years ago I invested in a DragonFly for dead of winter trips. It's by far my heaviest and bulkiest stove, but you can't beat it for reliability in subzero temps. It also simmers really well, unlike the WhisperLite.

For shoulder season conditions, I recently purchased an MSR WindPro II. It's a remote canister stove with a couple of features designed to extend the usable temperature range of canister fuel. The canister is attached to the stove via a flexible tube, which allows you to invert the canister so that you're feeding liquid propane directly into the stove rather than the evaporated fumes boiling off of the top. And the fuel line runs across the top of the burner to pre-heat the fuel before it is fed into the burner itself.

So far, I'm loving the WindPro. When the canister is inverted it is slightly tricky to get it to simmer, but it's not as much of a PITA as with the WhisperLite.

The stove of mine that gets the most use by far, though, is the PocketRocket 2. Lightweight and fast (in warm temps, at least).
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Old 03-13-2022, 09:01 AM   #86
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The Dragonfly, or maybe it was its pedecessor.... A friend of mine had one of those that he used in winter. It had the constant roar of a loud jet engine. I mean really loud! Which is probably why some brainy MSR engineer dreamed up the name of whisperlite for their follow-on design.
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Old 03-13-2022, 09:20 AM   #87
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I honestly use the Trangia mostly just for boiling - I think it's around 6 min, which isn't too bad. I think having a good stand, kettle and windscreen helps. I know Trangia made a couple different kits but I never tried theirs.

I did find the simmer ring useful for Hawk Vittles - as even sitting wrapped up forever I was still getting crunchy pasta - I finally conceded to simmering it and adding water a little at a time and had much better results.
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Old 03-13-2022, 09:47 AM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by montcalm View Post

I did find the simmer ring useful for Hawk Vittles - as even sitting wrapped up forever I was still getting crunchy pasta - I finally conceded to simmering it and adding water a little at a time and had much better results.
The trick to successful edible Hawk Vittles or any of your own dehydrated meals (I believe, I never orderd any H.V. but I made my own using the very same recipie book he used), is time and insulation to retain heat while you patiently wait. If unsure, I always advised to carefully open the bag to check for moisture content at about 10-15 minutes (half time), mix in a bit more boiling water if it looks dry, quickly reseal and wait out the time. Your patience will be rewarded.
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Old 03-13-2022, 09:52 AM   #89
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Time was always a factor, meaning even simmering them it takes forever, but I was able to better control the final moisture content and eat hot (not lukewarm) food. I know we've been down this path before and I'm sure people have had great success with insulation, but I found simmering works just fine if you're willing to pay the fuel penalty (and it does take a fair bit of fuel even though it's a low heat).
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Old 03-13-2022, 11:42 AM   #90
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I have found the dehydrated meals (like Hawks) worked extremely well with this process:
1. Start in cold water.
2. bring to a boil (covered)
3.stir
4. Cover
5. kill the heat
6. Wait.

I think starting in cold water is key, especially with meals which contain meat.
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Old 03-13-2022, 12:09 PM   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuctTape View Post
I have found the dehydrated meals (like Hawks) worked extremely well with this process:
1. Start in cold water.
2. bring to a boil (covered)
3.stir
4. Cover
5. kill the heat
6. Wait.

I think starting in cold water is key, especially with meals which contain meat.
I think maybe you told me this process long ago...

It's been a while, so maybe I'm wrong, but I think I modified it a little. I'm pretty sure I started with cold water, about half volume, brought it up to a boil, then added the remaining water, reduced heat and simmered and stirred until tender.
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Old 03-13-2022, 12:18 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by montcalm View Post
I think maybe you told me this process long ago...

It's been a while, so maybe I'm wrong, but I think I modified it a little. I'm pretty sure I started with cold water, about half volume, brought it up to a boil, then added the remaining water, reduced heat and simmered and stirred until tender.
Quite possible.
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