Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > Trip Reports
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-13-2010, 09:51 PM   #1
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,106
I fought the cripplebush

...and the cripplebush lost.





__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 12:10 AM   #2
looncry
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I love the blue ''hues'' in 3rd pic,Neil.
Im singing ''I fought the law and the ....can't get it outa my head. Looncry
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 07:29 AM   #3
NicksMaint
Member
 
NicksMaint's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Syracuse, NY/Elizabethtown, NY
Posts: 122
Looks like you had a great day.
NicksMaint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 10:52 AM   #4
SummitHat
That was fun
 
SummitHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Cold North
Posts: 200
Interesting approach route Neil - must have been challenging and fun!
I imagine the views from the MacIntyre ridge were spectacular.
SummitHat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 12:42 PM   #5
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,106
Knocked my socks off! I'll post the pics and report soon.
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 02:13 PM   #6
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,106
Voila the trip report. Pics to follow.

Here's the basic route that was followed.(I don't know why the balloons are lettered non-alphabetically)

This was one very cool hike. The southwest side of the Macintyre Range is a regular banquet of route choices and I had a lot of fun scoping it out from pictures, USA photomaps aerial photos and the map. Last winter, Randomscooter went about 1/3 of the way in and turned around at the foot of the drainage/waterfall, which gave me some foreknowledge of what to expect.

After a leisurely stroll along the Indian Pass brook trail to the lean-to on the tributary of Indian pass Brook I turned my compass dial to 145 magnetic and headed up the hill to my first check point, roughly 1000 feet of elevation above. It was interesting to compare the equidistant contour lines on the map with the terrain where cliffs and flat areas alternated. It seemed that to make things simple they just averaged it all out. The cliffs were definitely higher than 2 contour lines.

The first set of cliffs was a beauty and I made a long left detour and grunted up very steep terrain to a flat area. The woods were fairly open and as I approached the top of the East-West running ridge I was traversing I saw tell-tale signs of snapped off tree tops and thick balsams so I made a right-hand detour. This led me to a rocky outcrop at 3300 feet, 800 feet directly above the drainage RS and I had followed last winter. I had spectacular face-on views of the Macyntre Range and could see my entire planned route, which I photographed copiously, along with Wallface and Lost Pond Peak. I also dug out my gps and recorded the spot as a waypoint.

The drainage/slide I planned on following looked very steep and the lower headwall (pic) appeared to be covered in a mix of water and ice. I continued on my bearing, contouring along the south side of the ridge and suddenly found myself at the edge of a 50 foot vertical drop that didn’t make it onto the map. After some dipsy-doodling and doing an end run around some very gnarly stuff I dropped 150 feet down a steep but manageable slope and found myself at the confluence of 2 drainages and ready to begin the “real” climb. After being at that spot in winter it was interesting to see it again looking totally different in summer. Talk about remote and rugged!

There was no way I was tackling the steep headwall as it was smeared in a mix of new ice and wet lichens and it had water flowing right across its width. Into the woods I went up 30-40 degree slopes getting a good upper body workout. The views, however, were all from the drainage (one of the main reasons for the route selection) so I kept as close to it as possible. I tried walking along its edge hanging on trees but it was too treacherous. The creek bed alternated between steep sections and flat and the walls often formed a steep and narrow vee, so I alternated going in and out of the drainage until the pitch eased off definitively at around 1200 meters (4000 feet). Along the way, below the steep pitches there were several large areas of foot-thick, rock-solid ice composed of transformed and compacted snow from avalanches. Keeping an eye on the altimeter I watched for the obliquely oriented slide joining left at 1250 meters. It was obvious as the drainage opened up into a true Adirondack slide. From the top of the slide (roughly 1350 M) I knew I had 1000 feet of cripplebush to side slope through in order to get directly below the summit. I figured that cripplebush above 4500 feet on a west-facing slope would be hellacious but I also figured I could get through 1000 feet of anything, given enough time and patience of which I had plenty.

There were a few inches of snow on the ground and this showed the little seams perfectly. The seams all led upwards but I wanted to side-slope for a few reasons. One was to explore a different approach from the valley below and another was to ascend off-trail as directly to and as close to the summit as possible for my own quirky reasons. It wasn’t all that bad except for the little birches that grew amongst the conifers. Their twisty and incredibly resilient little trunks grew parallel to the slope and lay horizontally across my path at about hip height. But from within the cripplebush I had fantastic views so I toodled along very, very slowly. It was only 1 pm, and anyway I had nothing else to do.

I only had 190 feet of traversing left to go (according to my gps) when I saw above me that I had a straight shot of open rock to the summit. The lower slopes of Algonquin appeared to be one long series of fir waves and cripplebush in any case so I made the turn and slowly, very slowly, savouring the moment I worked my way to the top. The views of Boundary and Iroquois were splendid (running out of adjectives). I intersected the trail about a minute from the summit. From Loj to summit had taken 6 1/2 hours. There was a couple from CT there and when I answered the question as to how I had come up the girl actually laughed at me, or so it seemed. I sat there for a few minutes feeling very satisfied having made it up successfully. There was no wind and you could here Indian Pass Brook 3000 feet below.

Then I got up and wandered off. I really noticed the fatigue in my legs going down the steep, rocky and icy trail. The easy walk out along the final .9 miles of the Van Ho trail was greatly appreciated.

I think I’ll return when the rock is bone dry and continue straight up to the Algonquin-Boundary col.
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.

Last edited by Neil; 05-14-2010 at 02:44 PM..
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 05:02 PM   #7
Dunbar
Unfathomable Intellect.
 
Dunbar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: It's a secret.
Posts: 2,000,177
This thread contains nothing about dogs and leashes. Are you sure this is posted on the right forum?
__________________
Hike Always.
http://dunbarsm.wordpress.com
Dunbar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 05:40 PM   #8
SummitHat
That was fun
 
SummitHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Cold North
Posts: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dunbar View Post
This thread contains nothing about dogs and leashes. Are you sure this is posted on the right forum?
Good point. I was hoping to see opinions posted on whether Neil was acting responsibly when he allowed his socks to be knocked off.
SummitHat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 06:15 PM   #9
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,106
Quote:
Originally Posted by SummitHat View Post
Good point. I was hoping to see opinions posted on whether Neil was acting responsibly when he allowed his socks to be knocked off.
I didn't leave a trace of my socks in the wilderness.

I could have mentioned that no wolves, cougars or black flies were seen on the hike but didn't want to start anything.

All kidding aside, it was a fantastic hike. Great to research and plan, great to execute and fun to write up. Going to go through the pics tonight. I only took 50 but probably only about 15-20 are worth posting (lots of the same thing with 2-3 different exposures and zooms)
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 06:43 PM   #10
looncry
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil View Post
I didn't leave a trace of my socks in the wilderness.

I could have mentioned that no wolves, cougars or black flies were seen on the hike but didn't want to start anything.

All kidding aside, it was a fantastic hike. Great to research and plan, great to execute and fun to write up. Going to go through the pics tonight. I only took 50 but probably only about 15-20 are worth posting (lots of the same thing with 2-3 different exposures and zooms)
The plan ,the action ,the TR- And now, the fond memories,Neil looncry
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2010, 10:01 PM   #11
stripperguy
Hangin' by a thread
 
stripperguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Schenectady, NY
Posts: 3,758
What, no canoe?! wimp...
Seriously, sounds like it was a great trip. How long had you been thinking about this one?
And what is that all about anyway? Do you enjoy the suffering as much as I do?
Is there any help out there for us?
stripperguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 12:46 PM   #12
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,106
Quote:
Originally Posted by stripperguy View Post
What, no canoe?! wimp...
Seriously, sounds like it was a great trip. How long had you been thinking about this one?
And what is that all about anyway? Do you enjoy the suffering as much as I do?
Is there any help out there for us?
Pictorial essay.

Been thinking of doing Algonquin this way for a while, ever since I started whacking the 46.

But specifically, I decided on it 3 days prior to the hike and that's when I started looking closely at photos, the map, aerial photos etc.

I will likely go back over and over again. Killer views, easy to get at, easy walk off, multiple routes. Who could ask for more?
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2010, 02:16 PM   #13
looncry
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil View Post
Pictorial essay.

Been thinking of doing Algonquin this way for a while, ever since I started whacking the 46.

But specifically, I decided on it 3 days prior to the hike and that's when I started looking closely at photos, the map, aerial photos etc.

I will likely go back over and over again. Killer views, easy to get at, easy walk off, multiple routes. Who could ask for more?
Algonquin/Indian Pass. Dan and football team [those who want to go with Coach E] plan to hike Memorial weekend.Tx for pics to show them Looncry
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2010, 11:55 AM   #14
Rookie
Dream Farmer
 
Rookie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Boston Hills-Western NY
Posts: 899
Nice Adventure Neil ,

So, you are "whacking" the 46 ?

A "regular", a "winter" and a "whacked".

I wonder what the "patch" looks like for that !

You're the Man !
__________________
What it is is in your head !
Rookie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2010, 01:40 PM   #15
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookie View Post
So, you are "whacking" the 46 ?
A "regular", a "winter" and a "whacked".
Only 18 left to go and then I'll be a whacked 46er.
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2010, 04:49 PM   #16
Hairbag
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: W. Finger Lakes
Posts: 29
I read Neil's post and I feel so small. I'm still trying to get to Haystacks on a trail.
Nice hike, very inspiring for us older hikers.
Hairbag is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.