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Old 11-20-2013, 02:58 PM   #21
richard1726
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I think the key is keeping the mouse nesting materials dry - so I stuff the fluff, with a mix of tick/flea type insecticide, in short 6" plastic tubes. My lot is 1a + and I have at least 50 nest supply stations. I put more out when the mood strikes and do not bother to keep track of them. If you wanted to be more environmentally sound you could use wax coated paper towel cardboard tubes or tp card board wax dipped tubes. My tubes disappear under the leaves.
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Old 11-20-2013, 07:42 PM   #22
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I found one embedded in the back of my arm about 2 months ago here in Broome County. Got the two pill anti-biotic and have no lingering effects. Pulled 8 of them off one of the cats a couple weeks ago.
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Old 11-20-2013, 11:21 PM   #23
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I grew up in rural Rensselaer County, NY and always hunted and fished. We didn't even know what a tic was nor would ever see one on the game we shot. I literally stopped hunting because of the tic infestation here in the Capital Region and now haven't hunted in years.

My father is still an avid hunter and says he usually kills a 1/2 dozen minimum crawling on him when he is out. They are really bad in the Capital Region. He has had them embedded in him but thankfully has not tested positive yet, however he thinks he may have already had it. He now wears an outer cover suit that is treated with some kind of strong repellent that he won't even wear in the house.

I am still an avid trout fisherman and hiker spending many days in the woods and can say the following in having 2 kids, 2 dogs, working in healthcare, speaking to many people and having a tic phobia:

1) I had never had a tick on me (that I was aware of) until this spring in Clifton Park. I always wear 100% deet on any seams and strip, change and bag my clothes when exiting the stream/woods. I had just finished fishing and bushwhacking through some thick stuff while it was steadily raining. Because of the weather, I 'laxed and did not strip my outer fleece. About an hour later kept picking at my neck. Well, after the the 3rd try I was able to grab the "piece of dirt" that began to move and wiggle when I had it pinched between my fingers. I immediately stripped in the street after!

2) My daughter is 9 and has had 3 on her so far, only 1 embedded. Thankfully we caught that one within 8-12hrs of her getting it. 2 in rural Rensselaer County and 1 in rural Albany County.

3) To my knowledge, my dogs are 2 and 4 yrs old and have never had tics on the them. I use only a natural tic repellent called Triplesure and so far seems to work well, however I will not take them in tic heavy areas that I am aware of. They are not small dogs either; one being 50lbs and the other being 70lbs. The Lyme vaccine for dogs is not even proven and I personally follow a vaccination protocol that excludes using it.

4) It seems the tic problem has been slowly moving from Southern NY North into the Adirondacks over the years and seems to fluctuate IMO by elevation. In reading this I now see it has become more of a problem closer to the HPs areas also. It seems it gets worse going South from Warren County.

5) I think I kept/keep my tic exposure to a minimum for a few reasons. 1- My tic phobia and continuous checking of myself, 2- following the guidelines of wearing longsleeve clothing tucked into socks, no matter the weather when I am in a thick undergrowth area or tic prone area. 3- using deet on my creases, 4- wearing a facenet, 5- smoking. I thankfully now do not smoke so I may have to get some cheap cigars and just light them, lol.

We need to have a couple cold winters to help out.
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Old 11-21-2013, 06:39 AM   #24
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Every time I go back to this blog I get a little itchy....
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Old 11-21-2013, 07:20 AM   #25
Pat T
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Interesting thread.

Three in my family had Lyme this summer. We believe the source was our own backyard, East Lake George area.

This was a pretty miserable experience, one that I would like to avoid in the future.

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Old 11-21-2013, 08:18 AM   #26
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I spoke with another local hunter and he said that the ticks are heavy in the goldenrods. He said you can see them hanging on and jump when you disturb them.
He suggested I go to the local feed-store and purchase a collar like device for my dog. He didn't know the name of it but said it emits some sort of wave. When I go I let you know what it is and does.
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Old 11-21-2013, 09:47 AM   #27
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A friend of mine shot a nice buck the other day near Syracuse. It was infested with deer ticks.
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Old 11-21-2013, 12:36 PM   #28
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That's unfortunate! I know this isn't a hunting thread, but I wonder:

If you carried a big spray can of insecticide (like permethrin, for example), could you solve this problem by thoroughly spraying down the carcass? Would it get into the meat, or spoil the trophy appearance, or cause some other problem that would make it a bad idea for hunters? I've read several reports of this tick problem now; I think if I was a hunter, I would start carrying a big can of tick killing spray as part of my regulr gear...
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Old 11-21-2013, 01:44 PM   #29
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Hey, guys...I'm in Albany county, near the Schenectady county line, in Colonie. I have deer in my backyard all year long. My son was just dumping some tree stumps in the far back yard...he came back in the house with 3 ticks on him. He was only back there for 5 minutes, tops!! And we just bought a 34 acre parcel, also in Colonie, every time my S-I-L comes back from that property, he has 5 or 6 ticks on him.
I will say that the ticks do prefer some people to others, I rarely get any on me, S-I-L seems to attract them. But the ticks are here, and in large numbers. The limited hunting, burgeoning deer population, and mild winters certainly must be factors.
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Old 11-21-2013, 01:59 PM   #30
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Not all ticks are carried only by deer. Chipmunks are prime vectors. There is a study coorelating the elevation in tick levels to the drop in red fox population. Red fox feed on mice voles chipmunks etc.

So you have to take a more global look at animals.
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Old 11-21-2013, 02:04 PM   #31
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The deer carcass being infested with ticks is not anymore of a problem than being outdoors and in the brush. You can't get Lyme disease from the meat. And when you're finished dressing, hanging or butchering the deer, you should just check for ticks, just the same as if you had been out in the woods all day and didn't get a deer.

I've found just as many ticks on my clothes and crawling about when I was not in contact with a deer as when I was in contact with a deer.
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Old 11-21-2013, 02:22 PM   #32
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Cityboy, if your that afraid of a tick then you better stick to the concrete jungle..lol
I have hunted Otsego county for at least 28 years and always find "deer ticks" on the deer.. Heck the 2 we shot sat were LOADED with them and after hanging them I had to trim my beard because I couldnt stop them from running around while I tried to grab them..
If you let the deer hang long enough before skinning you will see most all would have died or left once the warmth of the animal has subsided..

Now for about 10 years my county is tops in the spread of Lyme. It's not going to keep me from doing the outdoor activities that I enjoy.
Not all ticks cause Lyme and always conducting a complete search after showering is the best prevention..

As to why the sudden spread ?
Well many things have changed over they past 30 years.. Remember being a child and always playing in the woods, tall grass and leaves ? Never back then was Lyme an issue..
Remember the Ban on DEET ? and all the sudden the Lyme explosion ..
No clear cut answer to why but again prevention not fear is the key..
Heck I'm scared of spiders & snakes but they dont keep me from going outside..
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Old 11-21-2013, 02:36 PM   #33
St.Regis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCD View Post
If you carried a big spray can of insecticide (like permethrin, for example), could you solve this problem by thoroughly spraying down the carcass? Would it get into the meat, or spoil the trophy appearance, or cause some other problem that would make it a bad idea for hunters? I've read several reports of this tick problem now; I think if I was a hunter, I would start carrying a big can of tick killing spray as part of my regulr gear...
If you were going to consume the game, which most hunters do, spraying the carcass would be a very bad idea.

Carrying and applying spray to clothing is important. It's supposed to snow this weekend, so it might be the first time this season that I won't use tick spray on my clothing.

That's right, I said might.
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Old 11-21-2013, 02:47 PM   #34
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When did they ban DEET? I haven't had any trouble finding bug spray with DEET in it. I think I still have a little bottle of 99% deet in fact. ( I use it on the brim of my hat, because it tends to irritate my skin). But not as irritating as skeeter bites, and black flies.
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Old 11-21-2013, 02:59 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forgedin78 View Post
When did they ban DEET? I haven't had any trouble finding bug spray with DEET in it. I think I still have a little bottle of 99% deet in fact. ( I use it on the brim of my hat, because it tends to irritate my skin). But not as irritating as skeeter bites, and black flies.
I think Ripple may have been referring to the banning of aerial spraying of DDT?
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Old 11-21-2013, 03:03 PM   #36
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And how many species of tick do we have in the woods? Out of that number how many transmit the specific bacteria responsible?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyme_disease

Lyme has been around for a LONG time.
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Old 11-21-2013, 03:40 PM   #37
St.Regis
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BRING BACK DDT!!! A little 2,4,5-T wouldn't hurt either.
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Old 11-21-2013, 05:27 PM   #38
ripple
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yup DDT is what I meant.. Bring it back ??? HELL NO !!!
I say Napalm those little buggers
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:06 AM   #39
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Napalm?.....See...goes back to what I was saying about burning....which is what the Mohawks and other Indians like to do to clear the forest under-story, especially in the fall of the year. (According to the early Dutch journals.) That's not going to happen again...so perhaps the best alternative is wild bird restoration...Wild turkeys, quails, pheasants and grouse eat ticks. For instance, The Great Swamp Conservancy out near Syracuse has a “Adopt-a-Quail” program has been established to help fund its continuing efforts to re-establish Bobwhite Quail. 'Course you need habitat that's favorable....that means no suburban sprawl. Chickens and Guinea Hens are excellent tick eaters, as well...but who wants free range farm birds in suburbia...?
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:05 PM   #40
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The tick problem seems completely out of control here in southern Herkimer county even with temps as low as they have been the little ba$tard$ are still out in force wreaking havoc. Apparently guinea hens are a good remedy to have around according to several articles I have recently read.
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