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Old 07-03-2021, 05:19 PM   #41
Tug Hill
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Don’t know that off hand would have to check in with the office in Saranac Lake, because the property was recently re-inventoried and placed under the 480-A Tax Law, and the cruise was contracted out. Plus it is most likely proprietary.

But there is a substantial amount of White Ash in scattered lower slope pockets with deep top soils. In recent timber sales we have harvested large quantities of high grade White Ash sawlogs.

Being scattered pockets, maybe the reason we have not yet seen the EAB here ? I’m not sure how far the EAB can travel on its own in its life span, without help from humans ,other animals and insects. And yes this is Lewis County.
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Old 07-03-2021, 05:28 PM   #42
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OK - not trying to horn in on your trees, just curious what kind of population is escaping.

I was assuming less than 10% of the forest component there is Ash though. Maybe that's wrong, but I was roughly guessing based on looking at DEC maps and more detailed assessments of areas I know.
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Old 07-04-2021, 07:01 PM   #43
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GM Damage in Naples, NY. It's pretty bad, most hillsides look like this or worse.

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Old 07-05-2021, 04:58 PM   #44
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I went for a short hike today in Rochester area. As I've said before dead Ash trees everywhere. Every once in a while my eye catches something that looks odd, or out of place. Yep - a healthy Ash tree!

I didn't inspect them close enough to see if they had been bored, but I bet they were, because I saw other dead trees within a stone's throw (As I said earlier in this thread I know of one tree that had been bored and looks completely unphased). I'm hoping some more will be presented on this later because I'm sure a few people are studying it, but it looks to me some trees may have some sort of resistance... or are just dying a little slower...
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Old 07-07-2021, 01:16 PM   #45
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I've seen 'dead' ash trees that looked like telephone poles come back to life after beaver were trapped out or abandoned their ponds and stopped maintaining their dams. The water went down, the bottoms dried up a bit, and the old green and black ash skeletons started sprouting near their bases. Ash are pretty tough and I don't discount their resiliency....But for awhile the buckthorn, honeysuckle, mf rose, and VA creeper are loving the extra sun...I bet the woodpeckers aren't complaining either
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Old 07-07-2021, 08:17 PM   #46
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In Yates County the moths are flying.... amazing gypsies! Ashes are pounded...
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Old 07-09-2021, 05:16 PM   #47
Schultzz
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Here's a link that may help you identify invasive species. EAB can travel on its own at certain times of the year.

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/res...h-borer-beetle
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Old 07-09-2021, 05:27 PM   #48
montcalm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by St.Regis View Post
I've seen 'dead' ash trees that looked like telephone poles come back to life after beaver were trapped out or abandoned their ponds and stopped maintaining their dams. The water went down, the bottoms dried up a bit, and the old green and black ash skeletons started sprouting near their bases. Ash are pretty tough and I don't discount their resiliency....But for awhile the buckthorn, honeysuckle, mf rose, and VA creeper are loving the extra sun...I bet the woodpeckers aren't complaining either
LOL - I don't think I've seen a single Ash tree without a shawl of VA creeper on it.
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Old 07-10-2021, 07:07 PM   #49
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A little off the EAB, but I was just watching a video with Tom Wessels and he was saying how beaver will purposely kill larger trees so they will stump sprout and start a new food supply. They also girdle, and kill the Hemlocks near their ponds, because to the beaver they are worthless. They shade out the hardwood species that they would rather eat.
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