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Old 09-29-2015, 06:26 AM   #1
G898kyle
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Winter hiking boots??

I currently have timberland gortext hiking boot which is great for warm weather but the whole boot freezes when it gets colder making my feet painful. Im looking to do not extreme (ice picks and all) but just about at most 3 foot of snow. My feet are always cold. What are good winter boots to buy to hike some mountains that wont kill me with weight?


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Old 09-29-2015, 09:57 AM   #2
JohnnyVirgil
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I will highly recommend these:

http://www.cabelas.com/product/cabel...ts/1678395.uts

they aren't cheap, but they are german-made, bulletproof and warm.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:00 AM   #3
Bark Eater Too
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Sorels...heavy, clunky, and warm!
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:51 AM   #4
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http://www.sportsmansguide.com/produ...lack?a=1532834

I have big feet and find it difficult to buy the right boots with much selection but I have purchased from these people before with good results.
When I work with logs and firewood I find the composite toe protects me without adding to the cold due to a metal toe. Also I like to keep the cost of new boots under two hundred dollars if possible.
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:30 AM   #5
RichieC
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Are you climbing? Then you need that sort of boot- I'm not experienced to answer that.

However, if you are in snowshoes, or walking on normal terrain, and I used to hunt grouse till March in all weather, and thus put on a lot of miles hiking through snow, Lacrosse packs are hard to beat. Was never cold in them, and could walk right across streams- through mud, strapped to shoes, etc.- are flexible and grip your ankle better then any other pack. When it got really cold, Bata Military "Mickey mouse" boots can not be beat at all for warmth- hands down. Basically Sorrels, ( which indeed are excellent- but the felt can get moist- so day two is not as good, day three in a row...etc. etc.) . The Bata boots have the same insulation, but is protected from ever getting wet by a rubber bladder, thus if you get a dunked foot, they will keep you toasty warm. I have poured steaming water out of mine when I post holed into a hidden stream once, when I got back! My feet were not cold in the least in this standing water... why the military uses them. However, being thick and rounded.. they are hard to traverse and climb in.

Like everything, you gain one advantage at the loss of another.

http://www.amazon.com/Military-Micke.../dp/B00B4ZF0RI

Note the white boots are even warmer, but even rounder... for ice fishing, standing etc. in -20 below in street socks.. , they are the schizzle!

http://www.alleghenyoutlet.com/alleg...demickey-1.jpg
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Old 09-29-2015, 12:45 PM   #6
Redbeard
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The one thing you're going to get in response to your question is a variety of answers...boots, like anything else, are a personal preference dependent upon your specific foot, price point etc etc

I would not recommend Sorel Pac Boots for anything other than shoveling the drive way, walking in the ski resort parking lot, or for Apres Ski at your favorite foggy goggle. The Sorel Pac boots do not have a solid shank but simply a rubber outsole these are simply not suitable for hiking, especially in the mountains.

I would, however, recommend Keen Boots in either one of two models: the Summit County or the Revel. These are not only winter specific but offer the rugged stiff shank needed for hiking, the Keen toe wrap, and back strap rigidity used to ensure the around the heel strap that some snowshoes use have something to grip.

Additionally, and most importantly, they offer a decent amount of thinsulate for warmth and are water resistant (no boot is waterproof).

Hope that helps!
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Old 09-29-2015, 01:29 PM   #7
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I've had good luck with the Salomon Toundra; I'm on my second pair. Warm, and light. Coming from Sorels. Sorels (or any of the Pac Boots, Kamik, etc., they're all the same) are warm, but heavy, klunky and unconstructed, as mentioned above. The Salomon's have some construction, but are still fairly soft to walk around in. If they fit you (they're narrow) they might work...
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Old 09-29-2015, 03:49 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCD View Post
The Salomon's have some construction, but are still fairly soft to walk around in. If they fit you (they're narrow)
Fell into a pair of Salomon GTX Boots for dirt cheap at an REI garage sale - I loved them!!! ...so much so that I jammed my anything but narrow foot into them. In the end they weren't the right boot for my foot, like you mentioned, very narrow but a super solid boot with all the right features - lightweight, GTX, rugged outsole.
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Old 09-29-2015, 04:07 PM   #9
Hard Scrabble
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After a cold overnight, my boots were always cold when starting, but after a short time, they warmed up.
I prefer leather boots for their support while hiking.
Jim
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Old 09-30-2015, 01:35 AM   #10
Schultzz
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Kyle,
The boots I recommended I purchased at Amazon for $70 with free shipping. (Just about half what Sportsmans Guide wanted). Agree with Redbeard's statement about personal choice. These boots are leather, warm, flexible while wearing snowshoes, supportive for hiking, hunting, and for me I don't have to worry about a log falling on my toes. Best of luck finding the best match for your foot.
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Old 09-30-2015, 10:00 AM   #11
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This a seasonally recurring topic on the ADKhighpeaks forum.

Here's a thread from November 2014:
http://www.adkhighpeaks.com/forums/f...2-winter-boots

My quest to find the perfect boot (for me) was back in 2010:
http://www.adkhighpeaks.com/forums/f...r-hiking-boots

I bought the Merrell Isotherm 8 boots (this model is no longer available) because they had the best fit and the characteristics I wanted:
  • Torsionally rigid.
  • Flexed under the ball of the foot and not the arch.
  • Slightly above ankle height but no higher.
  • Not too heavy.
  • Tall rubber rand.
  • Thinsulate insulation.
  • Relatively inexpensive.
They've seen four winter seasons (completed two winter rounds of the ADK 46). I wore out the heel linings but was able to patch them so I may get another full season.

Just like summer footwear, where some people prefer backpacking boots and others wear trail-runners, winter footwear has a similar spectrum. Some folks prefer tall heavily-insulated boots whereas others like shorter, even uninsulated, boots.

One of my friends wears his summer synthetic backpacking boots with thick socks and has warm feet. Cory Delavalley wore Hoka One One's (trail-running shoes) with neoprene overboots when he set the winter record for the ADK 46. The point is there's no single right answer and you'll have to find what works best for you. Good luck!
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Old 10-07-2015, 12:21 AM   #12
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You might look into Mickey's. They are military surplus boots that have a waterproof coating both on the outside as well as on the inside of the boot, meaning that the insulation won't get wet from your sweat or from the elements. I know people that have used them for multiple trips into the High Peaks in winter without complaint: http://www.amazon.com/Extreme-Weathe.../dp/B004ZCW8UO
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Old 11-12-2015, 03:25 PM   #13
reindeergirl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyVirgil View Post
I will highly recommend these:

http://www.cabelas.com/product/cabel...ts/1678395.uts

they aren't cheap, but they are german-made, bulletproof and warm.
PROMO Code:

115GEAR

For free shipping

These boots are sold out, but they look terrific. Maybe there will be a new demand for them. In any case, IIRC, the promo code is good for all $49+ orders.
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