Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > Paddling in the Adirondacks
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-30-2021, 12:39 PM   #21
Zach
Last seen wandering vaguely
 
Zach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Orwell NY
Posts: 924
My canoe is about 40 pounds and I carry it on a modified old frame backpack. That way I can also carry other things at the same time, and the canoe weight is distributed to the hip belt as well as the shoulder straps. I took out the top bar of the backpack and put in a short straight shaft with a little U shaped set of prongs on each side of the backpack. The prongs hold up the straight thwart of the canoe. I run a strap to the bottom of the backpack frame and the stern of the canoe, and then I can carry the canoe hands free except if I have to bend way down to get under something.
Zach is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 12:42 PM   #22
montcalm
Mobster
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zach View Post
My canoe is about 40 pounds and I carry it on a modified old frame backpack. That way I can also carry other things at the same time, and the canoe weight is distributed to the hip belt as well as the shoulder straps. I took out the top bar of the backpack and put in a short straight shaft with a little U shaped set of prongs on each side of the backpack. The prongs hold up the straight thwart of the canoe. I run a strap to the bottom of the backpack frame and the stern of the canoe, and then I can carry the canoe hands free except if I have to bend way down to get under something.
I've seen this done before and it works great.

There was a system that could be bought... I think it was called knu-pack?

montcalm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 01:09 PM   #23
Wldrns
Member
 
Wldrns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Western Adirondacks
Posts: 4,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by montcalm View Post
There was a system that could be bought... I think it was called knu-pack?
Yup, Knu-pak, designed and sold by Eric Knudsen. I. have two of those packs, once in a while can be found now on Craigslist. I wish I would have bought more of them. I've used mine extensively on a variety of boats. Eric tried to sell the company to me when he moved to Hawaii, but I was not in any position to take on that kind of effort at the time.

1) modified for use with a Hornbeck Lost Pond canoe (note the lightweight conduit bar from bottom of pack to canoe, allowing rigid stable mount hands free travel)

Otherwise (with other standard canoes) designed to normally be used with a lline from bow to stern of sufficient length to droop at hip/hand level, to allow control tip up/down of bow and stern.

2) Carrying a 32' voyageur canoe (promo photo for demo only)

Normally when not used with this Hornbeck type rigid mount, is used with a line from bow to stern of length to lie at hand level, to control tip up/down of bow and stern.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg knupak.jpg (73.2 KB, 64 views)
File Type: jpg knupak voyageur.jpg (50.7 KB, 63 views)
__________________
"Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman

Last edited by Wldrns; 05-04-2021 at 02:57 PM..
Wldrns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 01:19 PM   #24
montcalm
Mobster
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,478
I'm really surprised those didn't take over. It alleviates two of the biggest hassles of yoke carrying, that is -

1 - an enormous load on your shoulders
2 - the mess of having the yoke on top of your pack straps.
montcalm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 01:27 PM   #25
Wldrns
Member
 
Wldrns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Western Adirondacks
Posts: 4,335
iti is not difficult to fabricate your own, given you have a old external frame pack and come up with a way to make and attach the U-cradles from lightweight materials. I made one but it not as light or efficient or easy to use as Eric's model.
__________________
"Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman
Wldrns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 02:47 PM   #26
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,118
Quote:
Originally Posted by montcalm View Post




Really depends on your pack and if you will be carrying with one.
We do two-trip carries and when carrying the canoe I wear a soft pack of no more than 40 liters. On the trip without the boat I carry a 60 liter barrel in it's own harness.
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 02:54 PM   #27
montcalm
Mobster
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,478
Any of the stuff I mentioned will work. A flat Ash yoke with a contour foam pad will be the least expensive.
montcalm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 03:12 PM   #28
Wldrns
Member
 
Wldrns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Western Adirondacks
Posts: 4,335
The Hornbeck/knupak photo above was the beginning of a diagonal cross-adirondack trek with everything needed for all 7 days in the pack. Single trip, obviously. 185 miles including 62 total miles of carries one hot week in July.
__________________
"Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman

Last edited by Wldrns; 04-30-2021 at 04:31 PM..
Wldrns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2021, 07:35 PM   #29
TEO
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New England
Posts: 32
I use these pads to carry my OT Penobscot 16 RX. They've worked quite well.
TEO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 09:44 AM   #30
Zach
Last seen wandering vaguely
 
Zach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Orwell NY
Posts: 924
When I made the prongs for my backpack I used two short pieces of electrical conduit, some kind of thin walled steel tubing. One piece went in each side frame of the backpack. I cut a block of hardwood (ash or beech, I don't remember) about 4" long and put a short piece of dowel in each end, sticking up. The blocks fit on top of the pieces of conduit. I wrapped the wooden parts in electrical tape to make them look more elegant, and to keep from scuffing the finish on the canoe thwart. On my current canoe the easiest way to carry is to connect the prongs to the center seat, but I used the thwart on my first canoe without a seat. My backpack alteration didn't cost anything since I had all the bits around. If I was doing it now I might do something more elegant with aluminum, but the old version still works so I keep using it.
Zach is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 01:05 PM   #31
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,118
What do you think of this set-up, which I assume would attach to the existing thwart. The price seems right!
https://www.sail.ca/en/mad-river-con...ke-pads-500604
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 01:41 PM   #32
TCD
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,922
Disclaimer: I do very little paddling.

But my brief experience with those types of yokes is that they do not have enough "curvature offset" to put the weight of the boat on your shoulders. You will be walking stooped over, and the weight will be on your neck.

(We borrowed a fairly heavy canoe with such a yoke a few years ago. After a couple short ten minute carries on easy ground, my neck hurt for a week.)
TCD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 01:48 PM   #33
Wldrns
Member
 
Wldrns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Western Adirondacks
Posts: 4,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil View Post
What do you think of this set-up, which I assume would attach to the existing thwart. The price seems right!
https://www.sail.ca/en/mad-river-con...ke-pads-500604
That type is meant to span between the gunwales at the canoe balance point (presumably where the center thwart is if one is there). If it is the proper length, it clamps under the inwale of the gunwales. It does not really attacch to the existing center thwart (which would be in the way of this device and not allow you to balance the canoe if using this type). If you have an existing wood center thwart, then you need to use either a sling style or or some other kind of attachable pads that you bolt onto your existing center thwart.

I like this one as most comfortable for me when I am not carrying a knupak full of gear. I use it on my Rapidfire solo canoe, which does not have a center thwart at the balance point. You can buy the pads separately and bolt them onto an existing wood center thwart.
https://www.boundarywaterscatalog.co...oke-pads-24657
__________________
"Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman

Last edited by Wldrns; 05-01-2021 at 04:03 PM..
Wldrns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 04:52 PM   #34
mgc
Member
 
mgc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 357
Since most of my canoes are vintage I usually use whatever is present and add a swimming pool noodle to it to relieve some of the harshness.
Most of my modern boats have a straight thwart where I add a pair of these http://bourquin.wcha.org/yokes.html
Jeanne's yoke pads are the best. If you want to pair them up with a curved yoke consider one of these; https://www.edscanoe.com/portageyoke.html .
Ed's also gives you a few more seating options.
From my experience the best carry thwart is one that is parked on someone else shoulders. The first time my son carried one of our canoes over Indian Carry is still a highlight....I only had to carry one canoe that day...
mgc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 05:23 PM   #35
montcalm
Mobster
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns View Post

I like this one as most comfortable for me when I am not carrying a knupak full of gear. I use it on my Rapidfire solo canoe, which does not have a center thwart at the balance point. You can buy the pads separately and bolt them onto an existing wood center thwart.
https://www.boundarywaterscatalog.co...oke-pads-24657
I wouldn't recommend using those with a thwart. A yoke would be much better as it gives clearance for your head/neck and allows the suspension system to rest on your shoulders.

I also agree about the removable one. Usually those are designed for solo canoes because a permanent one at balance would interfere with the cockpit. And they tend to be narrower than a tandem, so it might not even be wide enough.

The basic design I prefer is the same, and that is the foam contour pad. Just get a bolt-on yoke and one of those pads and you'll have the same thing. It will simply bolt in place where you center thwart was. You'll need to trim the width (make sure you get one that is wide enough) and drill new holes - or take it to a canoe shop and have them install your new seats and yoke. You live in Canada, so I'd assume there is a canoe repair shop on every street corner.
montcalm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 06:03 PM   #36
Wldrns
Member
 
Wldrns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Western Adirondacks
Posts: 4,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by montcalm View Post
And they tend to be narrower than a tandem, so it might not even be wide enough.
They come in different lengths, no modification necessary. I bought one off the shelf that fits the width of my rapidfire perfectly. After finding the balance point I Marked it with tape below the inwale so I know instantly where to install it every time even when in a hurry during a race.
__________________
"Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman
Wldrns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 06:08 PM   #37
montcalm
Mobster
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns View Post
They come in different lengths, no modification necessary. I bought one off the shelf that fits the width of my rapidfire perfectly. After finding the balance point I Marked it with tape below the inwale so I know instantly where to install it every time even when in a hurry during a race.
OK.

Even so, for someone that makes canoe wood bits they aren't hard to make. I've had Conk make me customs seats, mounts, and yokes. I don't know if he wants to do a lot of that, but he's certainly capable. But for me I was willing to pester someone and pay a little more to get it customized because when I'm in a canoe, it's usually for a long time. If I was just doing half hour cruises from the dock of my camp, I probably wouldn't care as much.

I'm sure there are people doing this kind of thing in Canada as well.
montcalm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2021, 11:41 PM   #38
TEO
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New England
Posts: 32
Neil, If you don't get a Knu-pak, I would recommend getting a standard yoke from Old Town Canoe, Essex Industries, Oak Orchard Canoe, or Boundary Waters Catlog and getting from the Boundary Waters Catalog either the yoke pads I recommended—which are quite comfortable—or the sling style yoke pads that Wldrns recommended.

It's worth spending the money to get high-quality, comfortable yoke pads.

I don't trust the pleather, wood, foam pads like these.
TEO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2021, 10:49 AM   #39
montcalm
Mobster
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,478
Lots of things that will work for different folks.

I guess when I was figuring out my canoe outfitting it came down to two big things that were a PITA for me:

1 - Carrying my canoe with a pack. I love those sling yoke pads IF I don't have a pack on. I've since found a pack AND yoke that work for me. This is really no different than the knu-pack in that I had to really tune both parts of the system. I really forget why I never went knu-pack setup, but in retrospect I wish I had.

2 - sitting or kneeling for a long time. I'm not a sitter. I hate it. I prefer walking or riding a bike. Kneeling is worse than sitting for me but both suck IMHO. So for me to be in a canoe for a long time, this was a big challenge to figure out. I liked paddling enough I was willing to suffer through it and figure it out. For some, maybe it's a rare enough thing you can grunt through it. For others it's something that impedes your ability to practice the sport, so therefor must be overcome.
montcalm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2021, 10:13 AM   #40
WinterWarlock
One foot in front of the other
 
WinterWarlock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Schroon Lake, NY
Posts: 2,275
Neil - have you also looked at Ed's Canoe?

https://www.edscanoe.com/canoeseats.html

I bought my yoke from them for my Keewaydin Canoe (although will probably use it in the Mansfield instead). But they also have quite a selection of seats as well.

If you decide to try Essex Industries and they won't ship, let me know...I need to go up there soon and pick up a set of gunwales and can try to figure something out to get them to you.
__________________
“Death is the only wise advisor that we have. Whenever you feel, as you always do, that everything is going wrong and you're about to be annihilated, turn to your death and ask if that is so. Your death will tell you, 'I haven't touched you yet.” Carlos Castenada
WinterWarlock is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.