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Old 05-29-2022, 01:59 PM   #69
chairrock
Indian Mt.Club
 
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Join Date: Oct 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by montcalm View Post
I've noticed the state (or perhaps counties) plants a lot of Honey Locust along the large highways. Not sure exactly why, but I was guessing it was a relatively fast growing tree that has few issues, and probably is robust to salt pollution. They aren't quite native here, but they grow well. I have one in my yard - I have zero complaints. It's a great shade tree and it's easy to clean up after. The leaves are so small you can easily mulch them right back into the ground with a mower. It doesn't leaf in as quick as our natives and holds its leaves a little longer, but it does its job, and will probably be quite successful in our warmer climate to be.
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"Thickets of this tree ,the honey locust, can also provide excellent wildlife cover since the thorns will help keep predators out. The flowers are a good source of nectar for bees and other pollinators. The honey locust is a host plant for several moth and butterfly caterpillars." I like the black locust for honey bees, make a great clear floral honey easily distinguishable on the honey frames. Also make great fence post.
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