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-   -   How about a little bit about yourself (http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=3202)

Saratoga Filly 05-31-2005 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redhawk
Sorry, I don't hike with youngsters!!

Now that's not entirely true ;)

SunShine2 05-31-2005 10:35 PM

About me
 
Hi everyone...I'm Sarah I'm 24, and currently live in Tupper Lake. I'm originally from the Plattsburgh, NY area. I'm employed by NY state through OMRDD (office of mental retardation and developmental disabilities) for a agency called Sunmount DDSO. I have an undergrad degree (BS) in Child and Family Services, and hope to go back soon for my masters in Social Work.

I love everything about the outdoors and I'm especially crazy about hiking, canoeing, camping, backpacking, and kayaking. I tried and loved snowshoeing this past winter and hope to do more next.

Humm I can't remember my first hiking experience I do know I hiked alot when I was a kid, my father was big into hiking and backpacking/camping trips. I would have to say we probably started in the early 1990's. Every hike we did was a family hike, it was a nice way to bond with eachother. I've climbed a handful of the high peaks, and hope to do more.

I took a break from hiking 1998-2004, knee surgery, and the death of my father; but last fall got back into it. I've taken an interest in the smaller shorter climbs, ponds, and especially the firetower mountains. ( I love local history, and those towers each have a story) I did my very first backpacking trip on my own with friends April 05, and also my first bushwack. (what an experience) What can I say I loved it and I'm looking forward to doing many more trips. :dance:

I joined this website after one of my hiking buddies suggested it. They said it was a great place to meet ppl with similar interests mainly the love for the ADK park. I've read alot of ppl saying things about Tupper Lake ( most of which not good), I like it here....what I especially love is that I'm minutes away from a short hike, overnight camping trip, or some paddeling. :D

adkmountainken 06-12-2005 07:41 PM

hello
 
Hello all,
guess its time i introduce myelf a little more. My name is Ken Mowrey. i am currently living in Mayfield, right on the lake untill we have our house built. i am an avid, muzzleloader, traditional bow enthusiest, trapper, fly fisher and hiker here in the Great Adirondacks. i work for Fulton County during the day and U.P.S. at night. on the weekends i can either be found with my lovely wife and beautifull Newfoundland dog or i am in the woods. to me the Adirondacks are a life, without it i wouldn't be who i am. it is so much a part of my life i don't think i could survive without it. i am pretty much of a lone wolf except for a few close friends that share my passion for the great outdoors. i enjoy the forum very much as i see alot of myself in everyone else on here. we are a special breed. the city slickers will never understand nor do i see it fit to explain. you either feel it and accept the call or ya don't!! somedays i just feel a pull towards the mountains that i can't explain, i think in the old days they called it wonderlust. if you listen the woods will talk.
Ken

mike46r 06-13-2005 06:48 PM

What a great thread. I started reading these profiles in the morning and was late for work. Maybe these bios humanize the contributors and blunts some of the flaming that ruins the conversation on other venues. One can only hope. I was touched by the stories of Skyclimber and Redhawk and now I am worried about altec, who has not posted in two years. I hope he is ok. I know it is a challenge.

First hike was Giant the weekend Nixon left the White House. It was hot. I was reading the trail guide wrong and ran out of water the second day, ended up drinking out of a pool of rain left in depressions of the rock, trying not to think about the dead worms in there. Never made it to the summit that time, but have climbed Giant more than 20 times since. Finished the 46 in the early ‘90s. I got 30 of them in winter, but stopped pursuing the winter 46 when I totaled my car coming down Elk Lake Road in February a few years ago. No one was hurt, but the car was wrecked and my daughter was about to start college. My wife (at the time) was pretty mad. Said they had shut down the schools in the Albany area because of snowstorm and do I come home early because of the bad roads like other husbands?, no! I drive up into mountains. I can still hear her. In the ‘90s I used to go out west and climb in the Cascades and North Cascades quite abit. I never could get past Disappointment Cleaver on Rainier, no matter how many times I tried. I made a deal with God on the summit of a volcano if She/He saved my child from his troubles I would never climb mountains of certain dimensions again. I have stuck to my part of the bargain. It worked for the Incas.

I burned out a clutch driving up to Heart Lake. On Rte73 around Cascade lake, felt it going out. The car was barely moving, but rather than turn around, I figured I could get the hike in. I did, but could not get out. Again, the now-ex was pretty steamed about coming up to get me. I can still hear her. It was a very long ride back. It’s not the hikes that get me, but the drive.

I absolutely love the mountains and get to the Adirondacks several times a year in the worst of years. I now live in Vermont and work in Albany and have been exploring the Green Mountains and Appalachian Trail, but it just confirms the Adirondacks are special.

Neil 06-13-2005 07:15 PM

Mike46r,
Great post! You had me chuckling. Welcome to the forum! If you ever decide to finish your winter round I'll be your chauffeur.

Kevin 06-13-2005 07:17 PM

Mike, altec is an aquiantence from a computer forum. Early on in this forum's history I invited a lot of online friends here to help fill the room. A few still stop by, but most only posted a bit then went back to their forum topic of choice. He may not have come back because this topic/forum is a tad 'out of his realm'.

I've lost touch with him altogether. Sadly, it IS a tough road and if everyone whose needed to get clean did get clean the 12 step programs would be putting orgainized religion out of business. Many who find recovery stay, but there's a high percentahe that come and go for many years. They either die from addiction or find a means of recovering. That's why those of us who are recovering are grateful, knowing very well what a gift it is.

mike1889 06-14-2005 08:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mike46r
I got 30 of them in winter, but stopped pursuing the winter 46 when I totaled my car coming down Elk Lake Road in February a few years ago. No one was hurt, but the car was wrecked...

Hey Mike,

Welcome to the forum. I was with you in the car when you totaled it!! The damage didn't seem that bad. I guess it was totaled because it was an older car. Sorry to hear that incident ended your pursuit of the winter 46. You still writing for AP? <This> is your story right?

mike46r 06-14-2005 07:30 PM

Neil, Thanks for the welcome. I appreciate the offer. If you would break trail, I might really be tempted.

Kevin, I hope altec is ok. I do believe the passion for the mountains would give him strength. It sounds like it helps you. I have watched from the perspective of a parent. At the best it seems to be one step at a time, just like climbing a mountain and never giving up. You never know what tomorrow might bring. I am glad you appreciate the joy of life. I wish I could communicate that, but I guess people have to find it for themselves.

Mike1889, yes, that's my story on Marcy. There are a few other stories still floating around cyberspace, including one I did for Backpacker magazine on The Tongue in Lake George. I don't work for the AP anymore, but for The Business Review in Albany and I still manage to write about mountains even for that.

The car was not that old! I liked it, anyway. The insurance company said it would cost more to fix than it was worth and gave me a check for $6,000. The entire left side, front to rear, was damaged.

I am glad to hear from you. That was not the proudest moment of my hiking career. I was worried at the time that after climbing
Macomb, East Dix and South Dix and Macomb again that you guys would not be happy with me if you had to walk to the Thruway if I could not get the car out of the ditch. When I took this job I was at a meeting and a guy came up to me and said he had been in the car on Elk Lake Road too. It was Karl. I could not recognize him out of his winter gear and in a suit and tie.

I still winter hike, but I do more for the fun of it now and not with the passionate “need” to get Allen in February.

Neil 06-14-2005 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mike46r
Neil, Thanks for the welcome. I appreciate the offer. If you would break trail, I might really be tempted..

I've got a 16 year old kid that relishes that kind of work.

Quote:

I have watched from the perspective of a parent.
Having done 43 peaks with my teenager I think I know what you allude to. Dr. Jekyl after the hike and Mr. Hyde prior to.

Quote:

I still winter hike, but I do more for the fun of it now and not with the passionate “need” to get Allen in February.
Sorry, but fot the life of me I can't understand what you mean here. :D

mike46r 06-14-2005 07:56 PM

Sorry, but fot the life of me I can't understand what you mean here. :D[/QUOTE]

Why do I "need" to do Allen when I can "do" Algonquin! :)

I think that may have been the problem with my marriage. My wife might not have been so sure Marcy was a mountain.

Neil 06-14-2005 08:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mike46r
Why do I "need" to do Allen when I can "do" Algonquin! :)

You just touched on the nub of the whole 46er goal. I'm still trying to figure it out. What exactly is "it" that drove me to summit Redfield in December, in the dark, on a cloudy day??? Then to hike and posthole for 14 hours in April to help a fellow seeker (remember the Who tune, "The Seeker") get Seward for his 46th.
Actually, other than getting to know the region much more intimately I found my answer when I decided to do the hundred highest.

Two words: challenge and escape. (...but fortuneately, I have the key, to escape reality... - John Prine)

mike46r 06-14-2005 08:47 PM

Neil, I guess that is something only 46ers get around here. And mountain climbers and through hikers have their own goals that are insane to others. I know most people think it is crazy. I was thinking about the Appalachian hikers I met when the storms were rolling through, they get up every morning not knowing the forecast and just hike through it all.

Peter Boardmen (who died on the north side of Everest roped to his climbing buddy Joe Tasker) came up with the answer that worked for me when he wrote that somehow he believed that each mountain he climbed somehow made him a better person. i guess i believe that, even the little mountains and even the ones I could not get to the top of.

When I was working on my 46 I climbed mountains because I "had" to, I "needed" them, and I would risk bad weather and getting lost alone in the Sewards to get them. I sometimes wanted to hurry up and get them so I could go back and climb my favorites for fun.

AdkWiley 06-14-2005 09:52 PM

Well im Wiley and im 24 and live in a small town in the heledeberg mountains called east berne which is by albany. I've always been a fan of the adirondacks. Since i was little i remember vacationing up north , many fond memories, my cousin gettin attacked by a swarm of yellow jackets, hooking myself in the back of the head and my father telling me that we would just have to walk around with him holding the pole for the rest of the day, being out in the boat fishing really late and getin dark and having my grandfather telling me of all the friends of his that have been killed by bears running out into the lakes and tipping boats over. Ahhhhhhh the memories !!! Alwasy been a big fan of hiking but now as im gettin older im really gettin more and more into it. After aquirring a degree in computer art i realized that that was nothing that i wanted to do seeing that i claw at the walls when im inside for too long. AFter school i worked for a landscaping crew for a few years and coudlnt see myself workin 12 hour days riding mowers and not enjoying it for the rest of my life. now I plan to attend paul smiths in a few months and am super excited to get a degree in forestry recreation. seeing i was in school before for bout 5 years and got my bachelors in computer art and drinking im ready to actually study rather than study the beer and women haha :boozing: And seeing that my classes will be going out and hiking and identifying plants and trees and wildlife , which i do for fun, i just find myself so happy and privlidged to be able to move up into the beautiful adirondacks and study there and make a living and a home for myself and my future family- Wiley :clap:

Rik 06-14-2005 10:03 PM

Quote:

You just touched on the nub of the whole 46er goal. I'm still trying to figure it out. What exactly is "it" that drove me to summit Redfield in December, in the dark, on a cloudy day??? Then to hike and posthole for 14 hours in April to help a fellow seeker (remember the Who tune, "The Seeker") get Seward for his 46th.
Actually, other than getting to know the region much more intimately I found my answer when I decided to do the hundred highest.
Don't those trips make the best stories/memories? I like a "nice" day in the mountains as much as anyone but the days that end up being adventures are just as appealing. I've had plenty of sunny days with great views on Algonquin but the memories of those days kind of run together in my mind. The Seward trip memory could never run together with other trips. And ironically wasn't that a "nice" day on Allen last February? :D

Thedeadpoet 06-17-2005 08:52 AM

Hey,

My name is Martin, I'm 26, and new to the site. I live in albany NY and love the fact the city is so close to so many outdoor activities in the ADKs, Catskills, and Berkshires. I like to hike, bike, camp, and travel. I just got s sportbike last year, and I'm always up for a road trip. I work in television and go to school full time, but I can't seem to get enough time off from work and studies! But I definately don't get out enough. I tend to be an organizer, and getting my freinds involved in activities is like pulling teeth! I figured this might be a good way to meet people and share som adventures... so yeah that's me!

doug 06-24-2005 01:39 PM

I finally got a chance to spend time with this thread yesterday, re-reading entries from people I'd met or "knew" from their posts and getting to "meet" newer members. I sent some PM's to the moderators (it only let me send 5 at once so I missed sacco mt goat and lumberzac) expressing how great the spirit is on the forum, and thanking them for their work in putting it together.

It's amazing to read how many of us have had life-changing experiences in the outdoors, and how many of us rely on our memories of these experiences to sustain us in our everyday lives.

A while back I heard a cultural anthropologist on the radio theorising that our brains are hard-wired from our hunter-gatherer pasts to only recognise the existence 100-150 people in our immediate "group" and about 1000-1500 in the extended group. Civilization (going back to the first cities 5K years ago) challenges this reality and is the source of tremendous stress in human beings. Large-city dwellers avoid eye contact with people on the street being unable to acknowledge so many "others" and form various "tribal" groups, i.e. extended family, church groups, co-workers, etc. to try to replicate the ancient sense of belonging.

Kevin made the point that the "vibe," if you will, of the adkforum is a product of the collective spirits and characters of the members. If that anthropologist is correct, then I can't think of a better "tribal" nation to belong to than that which we share here.

Skyclimber 06-24-2005 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by doug
It's amazing to read how many of us have had life-changing experiences in the outdoors, and how many of us rely on our memories of these experiences to sustain us in our everyday lives.

That's because, climbing makes us stronger, mentallyand physically,
"weaving" it into our everyday lives. Therefore making us a much "richer person."

Judgeh 06-24-2005 08:48 PM

Yikes, Doug! I thought all of this was just about a walk in the woods. :D

Willie 06-24-2005 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by doug
Large-city dwellers avoid eye contact with people on the street being unable to acknowledge ... various "tribal" groups.

Personally, I enjoy making "eye contact" with the other "tribal" groups. As a matter of fact, just the other day, as I was walking to work, I was so focused on my "eye contact" with a member of another "tribal" group that I walked into a busy intersection when the crosswalk light was not in my favor. Almost disastrous, but the "eye contact" was great!

doug 06-24-2005 10:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willie
I walked into a busy intersection when the crosswalk light was not in my favor. Almost disastrous, but the "eye contact" was great!

:rolling: Good one. I had a similar experience in England, almost got hit by a double-decker bus. They come from the opposite direciton over there!

JClimbs 07-06-2005 11:05 PM

I've loved the woods since I could walk in them, and moved to the SE Adks to raise my own children in a similar environment (my childhood woods have fallen on suburban times).
I made a huge career move a dozen years ago and became a guide; leading whitewater rafting, rock climbing, caving, canoeing, and fishing trips in the south and central Adirondacks. The hugest part of that change was of course, to my income! But it has been a good ride for the most part.
I don't get out as much as I would like to (and believe it or not, less now than before I became a guide!), but still get out more than most.
I am still (always!) looking for that next great backcountry crag, so if you have a lead, let me know!

nature shot 07-07-2005 01:56 PM

hi
 
My name is Ed (barkeater) I'm a nature photographer and live full time in North River. I hunt,fish,camp but mostly take photos. I own and operate South Mountain Photos, started in 2002 when I took a fall of a scaffold and got beat up pretty good. I'm married with 5 grown kids and 4 (soon to be 5) grandkids. I'm mid fifties most days others mid seventies. I'll post some pics asap.


Tetkahere Sotahr

alancross 07-11-2005 12:26 AM

In a nutshell
 
I'm a Texan living in New York City. I work as a comedy writer and a voiceover actor for radio and TV commercials.

And in between, I like to fish as much as possible.

Lately I've been hitting a lot of small streams an hour or two away from the city. I've been camping a handful of times in the Adirondacks, and now that I've finally purchased a new backpack (instead of renting one), I'm ready to go as many times as I can this year.

I go for the solitude, and only in hiking and fishing does my A.D.D. mind ever seem to calm down.

tracker 07-18-2005 10:50 PM

I'm a 42 yr young geological engineer who is employed by an environmental consulting firm where I remediate hazardous waste sites and other polluted properties. Like Mike, I was laid off a number of years back but have since been gamefully employed and conducting these types of investigations for close to 20 years. In addition to this, I'm a ski instructor at a local area, assistant soccer coach, and a webelos leader for my younger son's cubscout den. Needless to say, this keeps me quite busy, although I still find time to run on a daily basis.

I have been hiking and camping since I was old enough to walk and backpacking for the last 30 years. I have hiked in almost every state except Hawaii. My backpacking travels have included such destinations as Colorado(where I lived for ~6 yrs), California, Alaska, Australia, New Zealand, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine. My first trip to the ADK was a snowy thanksgiving weekend at Avalanche Lake in 1996. My next trip was in June 1999 when I rambled through the blowdown between Dix and Elk Lake before the trail had been cleared. I've returned every year since 1-3 times each summer, lured by the wildness of the high peaks.

I have 2 sons, ages 10 and 12, who have been backpacking since the age of 4. They have backpacked in the ADK the past 3 years climbing peaks including Hurricane Mt, Big Slide, Yard Mt, and Dix. Each year I take each boy individually and then on a trip together. The individual trips let us tailor an adventure to their particular interest and ability. This year my older son wants to try the lower range including Gothics, Armstrong and Upper Wolf Jaw. I'm still thinking of what would challenge the younger one. If you have suggestions let me know!

Becca 07-31-2005 09:14 AM

So Glad I've found you all!!!
 
:dance: Hi, I'm 41 and I've lived within 30 miles or closer to the Adirondack park all my life. At present it's right out my back door. The Otter Creek Horse trail system is right down the rode from me, to give you somewhat of a location.

I've got three children, the youngest being 17. My husband and I used to take them on simple hiking trips when they were around the 10-12 yrs age. Mostly this would consit of fairly level ground hikes. The one favortie of theirs, was Whetsone Gulf gorge. Five miles around a breath taking gulf.

Now that they are older, the hiking bug has kicked in big time for my husband and I. Just yesterday we went to Blue Mt trail and hiked to the Summit. Our little min pin joined us, lol. Actually he faired way better then I. It was our first hike that actually involved extensive climbing. But after real slow going, (alot of people passed us) we made it.

I've been reseraching ever since I got home, and can't wait for the next hike.
Even more exctied to have found this forum, so I can learn and share experiences with everyone else. :clap:

CloudNine 08-03-2005 10:43 PM

HI! I'm Trish, 37, and a paddler (paddle-bagger???) Canoe camping, almost every year for about *yikes* 30 yrs now - preferably on motorless lakes.
Grew up in small town between Saratoga and Albany, and now reside in Greenwich NY. Come from a family with 5 kids, so parents introduced us early on (cheap vacation)to "wilderness camping" (I prefer the solitude of primitive sites to campgrounds anyday). Went to college near Spfld MA, and lived in New England for 12-ish years, but UpstateNY always felt like home to me,so here I am again. (Conveniently skipping over a dozen years or so and all the whos, woes, whens, whats, whys and wherefores)
Suffice it to say I've FINALLY met the right soul and we were recently married (July 17th :dance: ). I have a daughter (age 6) who I've been taking camping since she could walk and she's a darn fine little paddler now and a pretty good fisherman, too.... and now 2 stepdaughters (twins - age 9) that I'm trying to teach to paddle (5 people plus gear in one canoe won't cut it, so we take 2 canoes now, my daughter in the bow of my canoe and his twins take turns in the bow of his)

Favorite places to paddle/camp: Cedar River Flow (my avatar), although not NEARLY as nice as is used to be *sniff*, over the years becoming a victim of overuse and carelessness. I love it because its such a part of my past, my present, and now MY family's past and present as well...Its one of the first places my folks ever took us, and I know the place like the back of my hand. First place I took my daughter, too.
Lake Lila (my NEXT avatar) *sigh*, where I plan to have my ashes scattered one day (so much for leaving no trace! :rolling: )

There is something majestic and almost spiritual in the ancient mountains, lakes and forests of the Adirondacks. I love the sense of renewal I feel just being there - no matter how tough the going or what the weather is: the air, the views, the serenity, the smells, the sounds... *ahhh* :)


Glad I found this place - think I'll stick around for a while.

Wildernessphoto 08-03-2005 10:58 PM

Lila
 
Hi Trish!
Glad your on board.
I see you like Lake Lila too.
Here's a shot from last year to hold you over...

CloudNine 08-03-2005 11:11 PM

Nice! Thanks for that!!!!

If I know the road is clear, I might head up Sept or Oct for a coupla days.... Just one more to share (in this thread - until I find my way around better) - from a slightly different point of view (Helms Aero out of Long Lake :thumbs: - took a flight with my daughter last September)

mediclimber 08-22-2005 03:53 PM

I'm a Paramedic/Rescue Tech in PA. When not working, I enjoy hiking, kayaking, and rock or ice climbing. I'm 47 and divorced. I started in the woods when i was old enough to walk and have been there ever since. A day does not go by that i'm not thinking of the next trip of one of the last ones.

treg 08-25-2005 07:32 PM

hi everyone
 
I'm 45 and have been hiking in the adirondacks since I was 15, Fell in love with the outdoors and did a few summers in Yellowstone on a trail crew. I've climbed 33 high peaks and most of the big mountains in new england. The past 7 years I've concentrated on running and mostly trail running. I live in western mass area and run with my son when I can keep up with him. I'm married with 3 kids and coach baseball and am starting a running club for kids soon.

happy trails, Tom


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