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-   -   Some questions about solo canoes... (http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=27592)

mike7575 04-14-2020 03:08 PM

I went with the rapidfire. Im 69 , I bring a lot of extras, and I have dunlap disease ( my belly dun laps over my belt) so the RF was a better fit than the spitfire, at least for me. Joe changed my forward thwart to one a little shorter and it gave me about 3 extra inches to get in and out. It works for me.

kwc 04-14-2020 08:55 PM

We have Wenonah Wee Lassies & we are pretty happy with them. I’m sure that most of the paddlers on this forum look down their noses at these boats but they have worked very well for us.

Pauly D. 04-14-2020 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwc (Post 281036)
We have Wenonah Wee Lassies & we are pretty happy with them. I’m sure that most of the paddlers on this forum look down their noses at these boats but they have worked very well for us.

Wenonah's are great canoes IMHO. I really like the seat in the Wee Lassie.

Wldrns 04-14-2020 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwc (Post 281036)
We have Wenonah Wee Lassies & we are pretty happy with them. I’m sure that most of the paddlers on this forum look down their noses at these boats but they have worked very well for us.

I''d never look down at a fine bushwhack remote pond hopping capable boat such as those. I have two Wenonah canoes myself, just a bit larger.

Zach 04-14-2020 10:12 PM

My first strip canoe was a Wee Lassie II and I liked it except that I didn't fit quite right, but that was my fault, not the canoe's. It tracked really well but didn't turn as easily as my current canoe. My main problem was that my feet stuck too far into the bow, where the hull was V shaped, so my heels were pushed together and my legs would go to sleep after about half an hour. Once I didn't wait long enough with my legs hanging over the side to get the feeling back before trying to get out and I fell over backward into about 3 feet of water. It was not one of my more graceful maneuvers.

Rich Lockwood 04-15-2020 06:19 AM

NTV,
many lightweight canoes are made for high or low seats. Slipstream, swift, and my 16# savage wee lassie have high seats. Like you, my back won't take sitting on the floor. I have tried some packboats sitting high that were just too tender though. My next high seat packboat if I can get the money will be a savage River Jun Bug with high seat.

mike7575 04-15-2020 08:32 AM

I like my RF because I have the low seat but my back is supported and the foot pegs take pressure off my lower back.

Rich Lockwood 04-16-2020 05:16 PM

to clarify, I mean a hung seat so I can kneel. Peoples back issues vary, but for me and many others, the kneeling position is the most comfortable.

richard p 04-16-2020 05:29 PM

Pack Boat
 
Years ago I bought a Vermont Canoe Tupper. Designed by Rob Frenette (sp) in Tupper Lake. It has a cane seat about 3 in off the bottom. No longer in business but Slipstream now has the mold. Definitely worth checking out and it is made in the Adirondacks.

Connecticut Yankee 04-19-2020 05:13 PM

DSettahr,
You've been so helpful on this site over the years, I'm sure any of us would be more than happy to let you try out our personal boats.
Your chart is very interesting, BUT, weight capacity is a very arbitrary thing. Your 240-260 pound capacity would require a boat of at least.13' to be seaworthy in rough conditions I should think. Weight capacity is really just displacement, and length is more important than width, and don't forget depth. I really like the versatility of the Rapidfire, but the new PB 14 foot boat might be ideal for you. The price is a consideration but don't forget that this is probably a lifetime investment and 10 years from now the cost is irrelevant. I'm sure the cost of your preferred boots, pack, etc. is not much of a consideration then buying other outdoor gear.
So, contact the members here and try out any boat you like. (I'm volunteering all of you here), like Zack, I have a couple of wood strip solo boats.
After you get your first boat , then you might want to build a wood strip or skin on frame some winter.
I'm just about finished building a skin on frame kayak right now, 16' 24 1/2" wide and about 25 pounds, I plan to paddle it in this years 90 Miler. I should call it my covid kayak, since I've built it while in self quarantine. Last coat of finish on it tonight , then I'll give it a week to cure and get it out on the lake. If interested in checking it out , I'm in Lake Clear.

TrailBlaser 04-20-2020 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wldrns (Post 280997)
Couple of photos of my carbon/kevlar hybrid Hornbeck:

Starting out on my Trans-Adirondack Trek to Plattsburgh and the same boat with a home made spray cover that protected me on the big lakes with big waves:

I'm curious, who made your spray cover? I have one for my Sawyer Autumn Mist but not for my Hornbeck.

Wldrns 04-21-2020 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrailBlaser (Post 281106)
I'm curious, who made your spray cover? I have one for my Sawyer Autumn Mist but not for my Hornbeck.

i did, with considerable help from my seamstress wife. I used pool noodles rolled up in fabric to act as dams from splash. The whole thing rolls up to fit in a bag when not needed. If I did it again, I would not use snaps, but have since had experience making four others to fit two Yukon River race voyageur and two C4 canoes. We successfully used velcro glued to just under the gunwales to make overlapping segmented covers. Each paddler had their own segment to fit around them.

Woodly 04-21-2020 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wldrns (Post 281111)
i did, with considerable help from my seamstress wife. I used pool noodles rolled up in fabric to act as dams from splash. The whole thing rolls up to fit in a bag when not needed. If I did it again, I would not use snaps, but have since had experience making four others to fit two Yukon River race voyageur and two C4 canoes. We successfully used velcro glued to just under the gunwales to make overlapping segmented covers. Each paddler had their own segment to fit around them.

Any photos available?

Wldrns 04-21-2020 10:37 AM

5 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Woodly (Post 281114)
Any photos available?

yeah the manufacture process is archived someplace, I'll have to search through the digital pile of thousands of related photos. Meanwhile here are some others I could easily find: all home made covers

MTVhike 04-22-2020 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rich Lockwood (Post 281056)
to clarify, I mean a hung seat so I can kneel. Peoples back issues vary, but for me and many others, the kneeling position is the most comfortable.

"Back in the day", when I was paddling my 17' Grumman on mid-Appalachian whitewater, I would kneel and my feet would usually go under the seat. I would like to achieve the same style in a modern, lightweight canoe. (That was 55 years ago!).

bigkevkayaker 04-23-2020 07:53 AM

Did much of the same research and as a result, picking up Swift Prospector 14 from Anne and Rob at Raquette River Outfitters TODAY🥳
I have owned a Hornbeck 16ft carbon for the last 14 years and love it. Adding to the fleet so my lady can do more paddling in more remote areas. Always grateful to Peter for putting me in one of his boats.

Sinite 04-26-2020 09:30 AM

I did not read through all the replies here, so hope I am not being redundant. My wife and I have done many two week trips with the two of us, our small dog, and all the food and gear needed in our 14' Hornbeck Classic. The hull shape is important if you want versatility. We have paddled large lakes in rough weather many times up in Canada on long trips. While the PB boats are prettier I much prefer the versatility of our Hornbeck. It makes a great solo boat as well.
I used to field test boats for Hornbeck. I found that some of their other hull designs were faster, tracked a little better, or turned a little sharper, but the classic handles the big waves. On long canoe trips we usually end up having to deal with paddling in rough conditions.
I sometimes wish that we had taken Pete up on the offer he gave us for the 16' solo tandem, but for now I will continue to cram myself in the back of the boat!
Ultimately as someone who owns a lot of gear and has been tripping for a long time now I have to say that our Hornbeck is my absolute favorite piece of gear. I cannot say enough good about it!

Woodly 04-26-2020 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wldrns (Post 281117)
yeah the manufacture process is archived someplace, I'll have to search through the digital pile of thousands of related photos. Meanwhile here are some others I could easily find: all home made covers

That's good, much thanks

Rich Lockwood 04-27-2020 04:42 AM

I can also confirm the seaworthiness of the classic Hornbeck hull. I paddled a classic 10 for several years, and got caught in some big waves several times. Even though I am 180# and was carrying my camping gear, that little bugger just rode the waves like a cork. I have owned and tripped in over a dozen solos-some much bigger, but I felt more secure in that Hornbeck than any of them.

Wldrns 04-27-2020 06:55 AM

While crossing the northern end of Lake Champlain at Cumberland Bay with a strong south wind, waves were producing large rollers. As with lesser waves and wind my centrally loaded classic Hornbeck bobbed up and over even while partially broadside, though I was very glad to have the saving spray cover installed. I was happy to see my daughter waiting for me halfway along the peninsula at the end of my trip.

DSettahr 04-27-2020 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigkevkayaker (Post 281142)
Did much of the same research and as a result, picking up Swift Prospector 14 from Anne and Rob at Raquette River Outfitters TODAY

While I think I am going to opt for something a little bit lighter, I do have to say that I am still intrigued by the Prospector 14. I'd go so far as to wonder whether the stated capacity is an "absolute maximum before the water overtakes the gunwales" except that Swift is pretty clearly a reputable brand, and the stated capacities for all of their other boats are pretty well in line with the operational capacities given for Placid Boatworks and Hornbeck.

For someone looking to prioritize maximum capacity in a boat that remains firmly in the "ultralight" class, it seems like you can't do much better. Have you had a chance to get out in it yet? How does it handle in comparison to the Hornbeck?

In any case, 400 lbs is far more capacity than I could ever see myself using (even on a luxurious base-camping trip with zero portages).

bigkevkayaker 04-27-2020 09:32 PM

awesome
 
I did get to go out in the Prospector 14 on 4/23. Stopped on Polliwog off Floodwood Rd. I first have to say the boat is beautiful to look at, and even better to paddle. Higher seat that is very comfortable. I am 6'2 275 and I thought plenty of room for the paddler and 2 large packs, front and back. I thought it handled well in the stiff wind, was very maneuverable. I had it out a second time on Lake Champlain on a crystal calm day. Moves right along with double paddle, and easily with a single blade. I cant wait till this weekend when I go out 4 days/3nights!

hike53 04-28-2020 08:44 AM

To Dsettahr
 
Give Bill Swift a call in Ontario. I've known Bill for a while and I am quite sure he can talk to you about your needs.


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