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XC ski punk hot tent camping recommendations?

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  • XC ski punk hot tent camping recommendations?

    Looking for a good spot to set up a hot tent Saturday-Monday this weekend. Because it is going to get warm on Monday I am looking for a spot that I can drive to, or pull a sled less than a mile to set up a basecamp. I am also looking for a spot with decent XC/BC ski options.
    Finally, after looking at the weather it seems that the Newcomb area is probably the best option. I was looking at Essex Chain, but I can't remember where the plow stops.
    Thanks!
    Last edited by Sinite; 02-17-2022, 04:40 PM. Reason: Spelling error.

  • #2
    Not sure about camping out there, but Newcomb would be OK. Worst case you can ski to Santanoni if the tides are low. Hudson loop is nice, but short. I haven't skied out in Essex, but I'm not sure it will be the most fun.

    Personally, I'd head bit north if the snow depth looks good - Rollins Pond/Fish creek area is good to ski (if there's enough snow in the woods). Camping might be harder than you think though - tons of options, I'd hope the campground is plowed and hike in to a campground site from there. Floodwood road is always an option, but I bet it's not plowed much past the golf course and I don't know where I'd park. Paul Smith's has some good options as well, and you might be able to use one of the lean tos (or nearby one) at Osgood pond.

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    • #3
      Thanks! Ended up at the top of Mountain Pond for a couple of nights after other areas up north didn?t pan out. Turned out to be a good choice for some mellow cc style skiing with great conditions.
      BTW, my post was supposed to be ?ski pulk? not ski punk. Haha.

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      • #4
        Moose mountain pond?

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        • #5
          No, Mountain Pond just North of Paul Smith's. We drove all over the northern ADKS looking for some place to park and pull our sleds a mile or less. Turned out a lot of the access roads we were thinking of are snowmobile trails. We ended up at Mountain Pond well after dark, pulled our pulks on the trail north to the campsite and set up basecamp. Nice trails for CC style skiing.

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          • #6
            Newcomb Lake is definitely worth keeping in mind for a future trip. It's longer than you were looking for this time, at 5 miles one way- but it's wide and generally an easy ski. Some of the designated campsites on the south end of the lake are super nice, also.

            I forget exactly where the plow turns around on Woodys Road but I know it is well before the Deer Pond Gate access to the Essex Chain- I'm fairly certain it's somewhere close by the Goodnow Flow. If I remember correctly, most of Woody's Road is a snowmobile trail in the winter, so you'd be adding many miles of extra skiing that you'd be sharing with snowmobiles to access the Essex Chain via Deer Pond.

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            • #7
              Newcomb/Camp Santanoni area is really good idea if the snow is low or poor.

              I believe you could also ski up to Moose Pond if you wanted a longer trip.

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              • #8
                Hmm, so the weather forecast for Newcomb was 40f and rain for one of the days. Does the Santanoni area have a micro climate?
                I do enjoy that area. I especially like the remote feeling of Moose Pond.

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                • #9
                  No - not really. But because it gets used so much, and they get a relatively stable base, it's often skiable during a thaw. If it's raining, it's gonna suck.

                  I would typically have it on the backburner if I was in the area. I've wound up skiing it a few times (when warm) and it was always great. Needless to say it wasn't always my first choice, but it's somewhat reliable. It's not the most exciting or difficult ski (in fact I'd say it's novice). In the same area, the Hudson loop is much more fun IMO. But the destination is nice and there are multiple camping options.

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                  • #10
                    Actually if you want a GREAT ski (but short) to a good camping destination, try John Pond in Siamese Ponds WA (east side of Indian Lake). John Pond has a nice lean to.

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                    • #11
                      Do walkie talkies work in mountains?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aroojehsan
                        Walkie talkies are useful in skiing for several reasons:
                        Communication: Skiing frequently entails splitting off into groups or venturing out on various trails. Skiers can use walkie talkies to keep connected and speak with one another even when they are not in direct sight. This is especially critical at large ski resorts where cell phone coverage are likely to be weak or inconsistent.
                        Safety: Walkie talkies provide a quick and direct way of contact in the event of an emergency or an accident. Skiers may promptly summon assistance or notify their companions to any hazards or injuries they face on the slopes.
                        Coordination: Walkie-talkies help skiers communicate with one another. They can be used to schedule meeting spots, talk about route options, or relay crucial information like weather, closures, or changes to the ski resort's operations. This keeps everyone in the group on the same page and makes for a more enjoyable skiing experience.
                        Thanks #Arooj

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sandrahdes006 View Post

                          Thanks #Arooj
                          Makes sense they would, since they only need to transmit from one to another over the short distance between them, unlike a phone or similar that has to go through a central location that is further away (and thus more likely to be blocked by a mountain).

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                          • #14
                            it is correct to say that devices communicating over short distances have a more direct line of sight and are less likely to be obstructed by obstacles like mountains compared to devices relying on a centralised infrastructure for communication.

                            When two devices are in close proximity and using wireless technologies like Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, they establish a direct connection with each other. These connections typically operate on short-range frequencies and do not require signals to travel long distances. Therefore, obstructions like mountains or large physical barriers are less likely to interfere with the communication between these devices.‚Äč

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