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  • DEC and the APA

    Found this a little concerning.

    https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2...r-the-rug.html

  • #2
    Wow, I agree. Thanks for bringing it to our attention. I had no idea that happened.
    "Everyone must believe in something. I believe I'll go canoeing."
    - Henry David Thoreau

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    • #3
      It's a fiasco that DEC touched these roads in the first place. And I made such a comment in Peter Bauer's first article on this topic in the Adirondack Explorer/Almanac. In my view this is a rehash of old news. In other words a fund raising letter.

      These roads should have been allowed to disintegrate by benign neglect. I'd hiked the route to Allen Mt several times on these roads and overgrowth was taking over the road in places. Give it a decade and DEC would have had a hardend trail. Also, the re-work that was done did nothing for hikers.
      Last edited by Hear the Footsteps; 11-19-2022, 06:11 PM.

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      • #4
        I think most people can agree that this entire exercise was stupid and wasteful, and devoid of common sense.

        Especially stupid is the statement "...By removing the bridges and allowing the road system to start the recovery process, we provide a blank slate for the future of trail development. By designing the trail system from the start, to be a hiking trail system and not relying on using old roads, the Department is situating itself to create a sustainable trail system..."

        In most places in the Adirondacks, old roads, which were properly graded and drained 100+ years ago, provide far more sustainable trailbeds than the DEC's "blank slate" trails. Plus, they are already built, and DEC obviously does not have the resources to build "blank slate" trails. (Cascade fiasco, anyone?)

        Why did all this happen? Two main reasons:

        1. A childish desire to "manufacture" "wilderness" where it does not currently exist.

        Activist groups, and some folks in Albany demand "more, more, more!" wilderness designations, bleating like sheep in their green T-shirts. The result is that areas that are full of roads and other facilities get declared, by fiat, to suddenly be "wilderness." Now "oops, what do we do about all this man made stuff in here?"

        2. Mission failure at APA, and mission conflict at DEC. At APA, "projects" are seen as an opportunity to milk the work until retirement. Very little new or useful gets done. At DEC, there is a cadre that believes that people are the problem and that they should be driven out of the woods (hence the tearing up of perfectly good roads). And there is a separate cadre that believes that people should be allowed to recreate in "their" woods (hence the restoration of same roads).

        And the folks making a stink about the "road in the wilderness" are some of the same people who insisted on calling it "wilderness" when it isn't. Maybe their energy would be better spent on something that actually matters, like parking, bathrooms, trail maintenance, front country stewards, rangers, etc..

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        • #5
          TCD, Well said.

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