Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hiking in the Adks vs New England

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hiking in the Adks vs New England

    At an ADK talk today, a speaker mentioned that hiking in the Adirondacks was very different than hiking in places like Vermont, Maine or NH but did not elaborate, as it was not really the main point of his talk. I've only done one hike each in Maine and NH and a handful in VT but not enough to get a real sense. I'm curious if anyone has any insight on this.
    Successful ascents: 137 (81 different) as of 8/30/22
    Adirondack/Catskill fire tower challenge: 13/31
    Adk 29er challenge: 11/29

    Completed: Chester Challenge, Tupper Lake Triad, Hamilton County Waterfall

  • #2
    ADKs tend to be rougher, steeper, and -- esp. since the big surge in recent years, often in poorer condition. Just as scenic as others, but in different ways. Lots of steep bare rock, on trails & slides. White Mts trails usually better graded; more trails and more options for various loops & combinations. Much more extensive alpine areas (esp. Presidentials and around the Pemigiwasset wilderness). In those areas, long periods of rock-hopping during hikes. Lines of cairns to guide hikers. Vermont is pretty but if you like high, open places there's not as much. ME widely dispersed but the best areas are in the western end (Rangeley-Stratton & the end of the Mahoosuc Range incl Old Speck) and of course Baxter Park. ME high peaks have more of an ADK feel & roughness than the Whites, which are ancient & worn, sometimes like vast rubble heaps. They're all great, though!

    If you do a search, there have been a number of previous threads on just this topic.

    Comment


    • #3
      I can’t add much more to what Rickhart has said except this. Many years ago I argued with my Father, he said that the Adirondacks were the most beautiful Mountains in the world. After spending time in the Rocky’s, Wasatch Front, Sierra’s, and the Mountains of Arizona I disagreed. Well, I was wrong and realized that after I started my Adirondack adventure of seeing and experiencing the wild interior of these most beautiful mountains. They certainly are the most beautiful mountains in the world, second to none!

      Comment


      • #4
        Adirondacks have an absolutely amazing lean-to compilation. Many can be gotten to via relatively easy hiking with full packs. You can combine trails in the Adirondacks so that you can hike as many or few miles as you are able. When I was looking for backpacking options for the Whites, very few lean-tos were available that didn't require climbing to get to. After many years of hiking and backpacking in the Adirondacks, I can still find trails to backpack that will be relatively isolated. The top trails in the Whites do not offer nearly that kind of isolation. When planning my first backpacking trip to the Whites I found a great hike to Unknown Pond. Loved it. Looking at future hikes there though I was having trouble finding a hike that provided a combination of scenery, isolation and fairly easy access to. I prefer to hike into an area that has a lean-to (though I also tent when necessary), then do day hikes from there. For someone who is just learning about the Adirondacks, the options are endless. I was having a difficult time finding a second backpacking trip to the Whites that met my preferred criteria. I am definitely no expert, but I have all the necessary literature/books for the necessary research. As for the Green Mountains, I wasn't overly impressed when I was there.

        One area where the Whites shine is that they have some great options for staying at facilities like the Adirondack's John Brook Lodge. Unfortunately, none of them allow dogs so I couldn't go that route.
        Are you hiding in the shadows - forget the pain, forget the sorrow.

        Comment


        • #5
          On the Great Range last week, a guy new to the Adirondacks who was doing a 35-mile loop in the High Peaks complained about the difficulty navigating confusing intersections with inadequate signage. He said he completed the 48 in the Whites over 4000' feet and had little trouble in that regard. While I wouldn't disregard that difference, I would point out that the Adirondacks contain far more trails than the Greens, Whites and much of the mountainous region of Maine combined, so overall, the Adirondacks have far more signage.

          I've also been making the claim the High Peaks have far more slides than the Whites and have brought that idea up with many familiar with both areas. Looking at satellite images and pictures from my hikes in both, I'm standing by the claim. Now to get an explanation. A forester in NH laughed when I suggested they have better soil, she sarcastically said they are well known for good soils. While hiking last week two ideas came to me: older rock in the Adirondacks and a bigger impact from acid rain.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Banjoe View Post
            While I wouldn't disregard that difference, I would point out that the Adirondacks contain far more trails than the Greens, Whites and much of the mountainous region of Maine combined, so overall, the Adirondacks have far more signage.
            I think it depends on how you define "far more trails". Do you mean total trail mileage? If so you would also need to consider that the Adirondacks are a different size than the Greene's or Whites. I'm just getting started hiking in the Whites - one trip so far, but I was amazed at the number of different trails in the Whites compared to the Adirondacks. When I look at the AMC White Mountain trial maps - it looks like a maze more than a trail map. Many peaks have multiple different trails to the summit. You could climb Mt Washington many times and never take the same exact route twice.
            Last edited by mmaute; 08-08-2022, 11:11 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              More slides in ADKs for sure. And better traction, rougher surfaces.

              Better built trail signage in the Whites. Lettering milled into the wood. And don’t many call out the name of the trail so corresponds to the map better. All the trails in the Whites seem to have names.

              I can only speak to east side of ADK park and High Peaks. This in mind, ADK trails are numbered on the ADK club map but there’s no trail numbers on any signs. I don’t own a Nat Geo map of the ADKs to mention anything besides the numbers. Some ADK trails have names. But the only place you might see a name of a trail on a sign any more is in the AMR. There used to be a sign with a name of the trail between Lake Arnold and Mt Colden, L. Morgan Porter trail - sign was old, doubt it’s still there.

              Comment


              • #8
                The Adirondacks have bad trails are that are just awful compared to the Whites. For some reason I find the whole thing fun and entertaining.

                But the Whites have those long ridges that are exposed to the weather. Many trips are planned that cross those ridges. The weather is notoriously awful. This mixture of people hiking long exposed ridges in awful weather is what makes the Whites a more daunting mountain range to me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The points comparing mountain trails to mountain trails are all valid, especially the signage, number of routes and names. One thing I've enjoyed about experiences in the Whites is learning more about the people trails are named for, or who created a trail. That happens with the Adirondacks too, but less.


                  Overall, the Adirondacks have so many more miles of trails to maintain and identify. If all that energy and time were just going into the High Peaks, I think there would be less distinction in the mountain trails. But then I'd miss climbing up a creek for over an hour.


                  Maybe they'd all end up looking like the new route to Mt. Van Hoevenberg.

                  One thing all three areas have in common for me is that they are too far away.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    "If all that energy and time were just going into the High Peaks, I think there would be less distinction in the mountain trails"

                    Personally, I'm glad that the powers that be occasionally acknowledge that there are parts of the Adirondacks outside the High Peaks, even if the overwhelming majority of money (seemingly) and attention (definitely) goes to them.
                    Successful ascents: 137 (81 different) as of 8/30/22
                    Adirondack/Catskill fire tower challenge: 13/31
                    Adk 29er challenge: 11/29

                    Completed: Chester Challenge, Tupper Lake Triad, Hamilton County Waterfall

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you all for your thoughts.
                      Successful ascents: 137 (81 different) as of 8/30/22
                      Adirondack/Catskill fire tower challenge: 13/31
                      Adk 29er challenge: 11/29

                      Completed: Chester Challenge, Tupper Lake Triad, Hamilton County Waterfall

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        As a friend of mine who is an avid hiker and camper that now lives in New England once said to me, the Addies is where it is at Just.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You mean The Addies is where you are Justin. Hope to see you again soon

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X