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Adks not the only place figuring out how to deal with irresponsible climbers

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  • tgoodwin
    replied
    This isn't the first article I've seen about irresponsible climbers on Mt. Blanc. St. Gervais is at the base of a cog railway that goes a long way up the mountain toward the Gouter Hut, which is on the 'easiest' route to the summit. The earlier article referenced climbers putting on crampons for the first time ever when they reached the first snow.

    Years ago, I climbed the 'death couloir' to get to the hut. It was also during an abnormally hot summer, and I (and the other climbers) periodically had to take shelter under ledges to let a volley of rocks roll over us. The next day, walking on snow was much easier, and we we descended early enough that rock fall wasn't much of a problem.

    I climbed with a British lad who was in great physical shape, but had never been at altitude while I had been at altitude on several trips to the Rockies plus had just hiked the Tour do Mt. Blanc with my then-future wife. I managed to urge my companion on until about the 14,500-foot level. By that time I had seen enough solo climbers that I left him and made the final 1,200 feet to the summit.

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  • TCD
    replied
    Originally posted by saabrian View Post
    How about flipping the script? If you get hurt on the trail through your own irresponsibility, you are under no obligation to call 9-1-1.
    Absolutely true! Of course these days, we have people who call 911 because they are tired, and then feign an injury in order to get a ride out of the woods.

    We've had a bunch of threads about this stuff on the various forums. Lots of opinions! Rescues do cost a lot of money, and involve risk; and governments (and taxpayers) don't necessarily want to fund that.

    My point in the earlier post is that it's unfair to responders to put them in a situation where there is a lot of risk and obligation, but inadequate funding. Of course the responders feel an obligation when they are on duty. But that obligation is created by the laws of the government, and the policies of the rescue agencies. That's where the change needs to happen.

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  • saabrian
    replied
    TCD: The job of first responders is to help those in need. Not to cast moral judgment on the decisions that led up to said need. I believe that obligation is a legally binding one when first responders are on duty.

    How about flipping the script? If you get hurt on the trail through your own irresponsibility, you are under no obligation to call 9-1-1.

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  • TCD
    replied
    The central point:

    "risks they MAKE rescuers run" (emphasis mine).

    No one "makes" you do anything. If rescue agencies have a problem, stop rescuing.

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  • Bunchberry
    replied
    "contempt"

    "The municipality of Saint-Gervais plans to take measures adapted to the irresponsibility of some and the risks they make rescuers run"

    "pseudo-mountain-climbers"

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  • Adks not the only place figuring out how to deal with irresponsible climbers

    https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/m...sit/index.html
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