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  • Dog owner courtesy

    If you bring a dog on to the trails...

    1) If the property requires you to leash your dog, then keep your dog on a leash. All the time. I have never seen a "My princess would never hurt a fly" exception. If you don't like it, then buy a preserve and establish your own rules.

    2) If the property does not require you to leash your dog, please at least do so when people approach. Or grab their collar and keep them in your control. Even if you pinky swear s/he is "friendly." It's arrogant to assume everyone wants an unfamiliar dog charging at or jumping on them. Furthermore, if one unleashed dog sees another, it might not be pretty.

    3) If your dog has to poop, have them do it off trail or clean up after them.

    Thank you for your cooperation.
    Successful ascents: 137 (81 different) as of 8/30/22
    Adirondack/Catskill fire tower challenge: 13/31
    Adk 29er challenge: 11/29

    Completed: Chester Challenge, Tupper Lake Triad, Hamilton County Waterfall

  • #2
    Originally posted by saabrian View Post
    If you bring a dog on to the trails...

    3) If your dog has to poop, have them do it off trail or clean up after them.

    .
    ...and take your filled poop bags with you, don't leave them on the side of the trail or at trailheads. I see way too much of this.
    Life's short, hunt hard!

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    • #3
      I leash my dog out of respect for my dog, as well as for hikers. She would run far too much if off leash, leaving her crippled by the end. Gotta love Labs... Also, she will inevitably find some inconsiderate dog owner's critter's poop and decide it would taste good (see above Lab comment).

      Just leash your dog. Pretty simple.

      Comment


      • #4
        Indeed. If your nosy pooch scampers off and runs into a porcupine, or worse, a mama bear...
        Successful ascents: 137 (81 different) as of 8/30/22
        Adirondack/Catskill fire tower challenge: 13/31
        Adk 29er challenge: 11/29

        Completed: Chester Challenge, Tupper Lake Triad, Hamilton County Waterfall

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        • #5
          I agree 100% with this post and the replies thus far. At the same time, if someone is uncomfortable with hiking in areas that is perfectly legal to have your dog off leash, than they should probably hike elsewhere. One thing I really worked hard at back when I had a people & dog loving friendly lab, was to train her to walk behind me. It took a while but eventually was successful. One thing that I believed helped tremendously was to hike off trail a lot, or in areas where there was very little chance of running into others. If you are unable to train your dog to behave properly and respond to your commands, then you definitely should not let your dog run off leash period.

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          • #6
            100% what Justin said. In much of the Adirondacks it is legal to have your dog off leash. My dog is trained to stay close to me and return on command. She's actually much better behaved off leash than on. For that reason I stay out of the High Peaks and other areas where leashes are required 100% of the time. And obviously in campgrounds and at trailheads or places where there are alot of people or other dogs the leash is on.

            Over the years I've had far more negative experiences dealing with loud and poorly behaved children than I've had with unleashed dogs.

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            • #7
              I am comfortable in areas with (legally) unleashed dogs... if they are properly controlled. But if your unleashed "friendly" dog comes charging at me barking and tries to jump me, don't yell at me when he gets a face full of walking stick. This has happened.

              By contrast, I've never been jumped by poorly behaved children.
              Successful ascents: 137 (81 different) as of 8/30/22
              Adirondack/Catskill fire tower challenge: 13/31
              Adk 29er challenge: 11/29

              Completed: Chester Challenge, Tupper Lake Triad, Hamilton County Waterfall

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by saabrian View Post
                I am comfortable in areas with (legally) unleashed dogs... if they are properly controlled. But if your unleashed "friendly" dog comes charging at me barking and tries to jump me, don't yell at me when he gets a face full of walking stick. This has happened.

                By contrast, I've never been jumped by poorly behaved children.
                I have done the same, use my walking stick as a barrier to prevent an oncoming unleashed dog. Thankfully never needed to use it on the dogs face, but definitely would have if I needed to. Sounds like you have had some bad interactions with unleashed dogs. So have I, I get it. One time I had to defend my dog from another dog that came charging out of a tent as we walked by, but thankfully no violence was needed. But for the most part it is pretty far and few between when any kind of negativity happens, at least where I enjoy to hike. And yes, I have had a few bad experiences with disrespectful youngsters also that I would have loved to smash in the face with my hiking stick but decided against it lol.

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                • #9
                  My docile and leashed chocolate lab and I were nearly devoured by 2 Rottweilers that their petite owner was barely able to hold back at Lake Tear after descending Skylight. I lost a nice pair of sunglasses in the effort to scamper by the beasts. Didn't ruin the day, but put a damper on the fun and could have been tragic. Why people hike with aggressive dogs I have no idea

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                  • #10
                    My issue with some/most dog owners is that they assume everyone loves their dog as much as they do and that their dog loves everyone as much as they do their owners.
                    I personally am glad for the human that has a pet companion, its a beautiful thing. However I am uncomfortable around dogs and don't appreciate said assumption.
                    "A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden

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                    • #11
                      I totally get where everyone is coming from. In my own experiences, I have hiked well over 10,000 miles during my adult life (sucks getting old!!!), most of those with my dog(s). I have hiked in numerous locations and a whole bunch of the Adirondacks. In all of those miles my dog encountered three instances of minor confrontations with other dogs (never with a person). It literally takes one bad owner who doesn't know how to properly hike with their dog to spoil it for those of us who take tremendous pride in hiking with our well behaved canines. Whenever I come across dog poop laying in the middle of the trail it pisses me off, and I remove it. People taking their dogs off leash on busy weekends where tons of people are hiking are asking for trouble. I hike and backpack during the off seasons and mid week in order to increase my chances of solitude for me and my dog. When the weather really sucks my dog and I take full advantage of it because very few people want to get wet and have muddy shoes!!!

                      I also know that one's version of "an unleashed dog nearly attacked me", can vary from a friendly lab that walked up to someone, to a pit that tried to kill me. Some people (most definitely not implying this to anyone who has responded to this thread) simply don't like dogs period. I have had dogs in my life for as long as I can remember, and I board other peoples dogs in my home when their parents are out of town. I have hiked with many, many different breeds, and often my hikes with them are their first exposure to trail hiking. In these situations I have never had even a single incident because of the effort I put in with them prior to going out into the woods.
                      I totally understand that if a dog in my care or one of my own cause a disturbance when out hiking, the consequences go far beyond that particular incident. My dogs have never charged at a person, bit anyone, stole anyone's food, growled threateningly or other such behavior. I can only speak for myself, but I am also aware that if I came across someone who had concerns, they wouldn't know that. I concentrate my hikes now almost exclusively in areas where my dogs can be legally off leash, but I would be lying if I said I never hike in areas where by law they must be leashed. My dogs are a very positive reflection for other dogs and I make sure to put in the work to keep it that way.
                      Last edited by rbi99; 06-09-2022, 08:32 AM.
                      Are you hiding in the shadows - forget the pain, forget the sorrow.

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                      • #12
                        Where and what are rules and areas dogs can go unleashed?

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                        • #13
                          RBI99, I like dogs. If I didn't live in an apartment, I would have one. I will sometimes ask dog owners if I can pet their canine. But again, that goes to courtesy. I just don't go up to a strange dog and start trying to pet it. I keep myself in control until I get consent of the other human.

                          Ultimately, it doesn't matter if someone else likes dogs or not. If you keep your dog under control, there is no risk of someone else's figment of their imagination feeling threatened by it. (Spoiler alert: the scar on my arm is not a figment of my imagination)

                          As one poster above mentioned, it's arrogant to assume that every person and dog is going to automatically like your (unknown to them) pooch charging at them so why bother keeping them in control.

                          At the end of the day, my point is: if the rules say leash your damn dog, then leash your damn dog. No excuses. No exceptions.

                          If the rules allow unleashed dogs, then at least make sure you dog is under control. No excuses.

                          I realize everyone posting here has perfectly behaved dogs and are perfect owners. Awesome! Recognize that not all owners live up to your exemplary standards.

                          I've had a charging dog try to jump me, get a face full of walking stick and then have the owner yell at me for "attacking" the canine. You don't think the reaction of the owner pissed me off even more than his lack of control?



                          This is not an attack on dog owners. People who control their dog properly, I have no problems with. But you know very well that many do not.

                          I've filibustered enough already so safe hiking everyone. And thank you for respecting others.
                          Successful ascents: 137 (81 different) as of 8/30/22
                          Adirondack/Catskill fire tower challenge: 13/31
                          Adk 29er challenge: 11/29

                          Completed: Chester Challenge, Tupper Lake Triad, Hamilton County Waterfall

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                          • #14
                            I for one would never lay claim to being a perfect dog owner. Like all lessons in life, I have learned from my mistakes. Thru many years of working at making myself a better dog parent and learning what makes a great hiking canine companion, I have reached a point in my life where I feel fairly confident that I know what I am doing regarding my dog. I'm a dog freak, that I readily admit to. But as others have made very clear, it takes many good dogs and parents to make up for one idiot parent.
                            Are you hiding in the shadows - forget the pain, forget the sorrow.

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                            • #15
                              One time I was trolling around on Forked Lake and got snagged up about 15 or 20ft out from a campsite with a very angry dog. While was trying to get my $10 lure free the dog was in hysterics. Instead of quieting down his dog, the owner proceeded to yell at me as well.

                              I still recall when he said, "I PAID A LOT OF MONEY TO CAMP HERE!!!!". I responded... "No you didn't, you paid $18 a night!".

                              I ended up having to break off my lure in fear that either the dog or the owner were going to escalate the situation further.

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