Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dog owner courtesy

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Well said Zach.

    My point of view definitely changed now that random German Shepards run up to my 5 year old?s face on a busy trail, it?s just different than one running up to an adult.

    Just cause something is legal doesn?t mean it?s a good idea to do in every scenario.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by ILikeRocks View Post

      My point of view definitely changed now that random German Shepards run up to my 5 year old?s face on a busy trail, it?s just different than one running up to an adult.

      Just cause something is legal doesn?t mean it?s a good idea to do in every scenario.
      100% agree, and the German Sheperds owner should be ashamed of themselves. Especially on a busy trail! I love all dog breeds but something about a German Shepherd that is unleashed and loudly barking at you is extremely scary. My neighbor has one. Every damn time I go out in my own back yard I am getting barked at by this crazy bastard, so I know the feeling. Friggin hate that dog!

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by ILikeRocks View Post
        The hope (mine anyway) is that since many people read forums like this, that they learn proper trail etiquette. What?s the point of saying anything on a web forum? Sharing info.
        This is the point of posting on a forum or social media about these issues!

        Comment


        • #34
          Also, anyone who says my dog would never hurt a flea, you know right then and there this person has no idea what they are talking about. Because anyone who has ever had a dog ever that has had fleas knows that dog will scratch, chew, and naw at itself endlessly until it tries to kill every single last flea on its body as they start to invade your house, carpet, and other pets.

          Comment


          • #35
            I've heard both flea and fly used in that context. Would fly seem more plausible? I think some people really believe that because their dog is nice to them it will be nice to everybody, even when they can't see what it's doing. I have met some dogs who were very well behaved even when alone, but some owners seem to think they have trained their dogs better than they have.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Zach View Post
              I've heard both flea and fly used in that context. Would fly seem more plausible?
              I am probably the wrong person to ask. Every dog I have ever had tries to bite the deer flies, horseflies, and stable flies as they swarm around, damn near tipping us over in the canoe sometimes.

              Comment


              • #37
                Just like there are fair weather, weekend warriors that really don't have a clue when out hiking, there are those same kinds of people who happen to have dogs. The problem for those of us who respect nature and other people, but who have spent a considerable amount of time engaging with our dogs so that they understand what is expected of them, just one idiot paints a black eye on all of us.
                Are you hiding in the shadows - forget the pain, forget the sorrow.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Zach View Post
                  I've heard both flea and fly used in that context. Would fly seem more plausible?
                  My yellow lab used to sit in front of an open window while catching and eating the flies on the screen. He never had fleas, so I don't know if he would've hurt them or not. Flies, however... yes, he would definitely hurt them.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Dogs in the forest

                    I lurk here a lot but almost never post. I'd thought I'd chime in.

                    I hike and fish with two large dogs. One is a 120lb Rhodesian Ridgeback and the other is a 90lb Shepherd/Rottweiler mix. They are both obediant and well-behaved, but they are very big and I can understand people being afraid of them.

                    I usually am bushwacking or on seldom used trails. Its difficult to have them on leash when hiking because they are constantly getting tangled in trees and undergrowth. I make them stay where I can see them and when another hiker approaches I leash them and we step off the trail to let them pass.

                    Both dogs have excellent recall and will stop chasing a deer or squirrel and return if I call them. The problem comes when someone approaches and I don't see them. The Ridgeback thinks that the way to introduce yourself is to charge someone while barking. Then he tries to get them to pet him. He also loves to run the trail at top speed and if someone is there he veers at the last moment to go around them. Ridgebacks are very fast so it looks like he's going to run into you. He doesn't touch them but I am not willing to trust that it will never happen.

                    I can see how this can be scary, It scared me when I first adopted him. This has happened twice. Both times, the person understood what was going on and just laughed at him but that was pure luck. In any case, there is absolutely no reason that someone should be subjected to a situation like that where any reasonable person would be frightened. We are currently seeing a trainer to stop this behavior. It costs slightly more than $1000. I hope it works but Ridgebacks are naturally suspicious of strangers and his brother has anxiety issues. I'm thinking it might be a good thing if he got a good shot in the face from a hiking stick. Might change his behavior a bit. Please feel free. Then yell "NO!" and tell him to sit down. I'll hold your pack for you.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Rocky, I hope the training helps because if your dog behaves the way you say it does, I see bad things happening to it

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Rocky, I appreciate the post.
                        "A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Don't misunderstand me. If I cannot get this behavior under control, the dog will not be allowed to subject other people to it. I am confident he is not dangerous. Of course, one can never be certain, anymore than one can be certain that a hiker you meet is not some serial killer. But, to someone who doesn't know him, he gives the appearance of being dangerous when he behaves this way. As the "adult in the room," so to speak, I have to set limits, just as I would with a human child. Both for the peace of mind of people we meet, and for his own well-being, he will have to either act appropriately or he won't be able to run in the woods. That would be a shame because that is what ridgebacks were bred to do and its obviously something he enjoys.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X