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Blackflies 2022!

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  • #31
    Still plenty of black flies and deer flies in the Five Ponds wilderness, and mosquitos are really bad.

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    • #32
      After spending a few days on Lows this past week, the wind was very strong on Monday and Tuesday, so the bugs, while present and persistant, were not terribly troublesome in my chosen well exposed campsistes.

      In a calmer wind yessterday I decided it was safe enough without whitecaps to paddle over to the Oswegatchie traverse trail, to revisit s couple of old sites by bushwhack that I would often use as a student guide navigation training challenge using map and compass only to navigate the way

      The Tri-Coiunty Marker is unique in the area in that you can simultaneously stand in three counties all at the same time (if you three legs that is). Not far away, but still a bushwhack challenge to find, is what we call "the Old Man". A giant white pine that at one time was in contention for the largest in the state, until it lost its top in the 1995 derecho. He had dozens of nearby brother trees of nearly the same size, but they all perished in that wicked windstorm, leaving him alone to stand and be awed over by those who know of his location.
      By the way, the mosquitoes and deer flies were wicked on this bushwhack yesterday. Black flies were only a minor irritating presence in comparison.
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      "Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman

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      • #33
        The dragonflies should be eating well

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        • #34
          Wldrns,
          That white pine must be a sight! Thanks for the pics.
          "A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden

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          • #35
            Went for an overnight on Grass Pond (off Lows) from Wednesday to Thursday. I thought bugs were not bad at all. I only used some DEET in the evening around the campfire. I did not have the urge to use any black fly repellent during this trip. Had a couple deer flies bothering me while sitting at lakeshore, but I didn't even bother looking for my deerfly tape.

            Thursday morning, after the thunderstorm, since the winds were from the south, I paddled back along the south shore of Lows. Virtually no breeze there and virtually no bugs there also.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Wldrns View Post
              After spending a few days on Lows this past week, the wind was very strong on Monday and Tuesday, so the bugs, while present and persistant, were not terribly troublesome in my chosen well exposed campsistes.

              In a calmer wind yessterday I decided it was safe enough without whitecaps to paddle over to the Oswegatchie traverse trail, to revisit s couple of old sites by bushwhack that I would often use as a student guide navigation training challenge using map and compass only to navigate the way

              The Tri-Coiunty Marker is unique in the area in that you can simultaneously stand in three counties all at the same time (if you three legs that is). Not far away, but still a bushwhack challenge to find, is what we call "the Old Man". A giant white pine that at one time was in contention for the largest in the state, until it lost its top in the 1995 derecho. He had dozens of nearby brother trees of nearly the same size, but they all perished in that wicked windstorm, leaving him alone to stand and be awed over by those who know of his location.
              By the way, the mosquitoes and deer flies were wicked on this bushwhack yesterday. Black flies were only a minor irritating presence in comparison.
              Nice pics, thanks for sharing. Brings back the memories of when there were a lot of big trees like that in the Five Ponds Wilderness.
              "Everyone must believe in something. I believe I'll go canoeing."
              - Henry David Thoreau

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              • #37
                Took a float down the Black River yesterday and the bugs were not an issue albeit there was constant wind.
                "A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden

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                • #38
                  Bugs were not bad in Piercefield this week either, hardly any during the day and only some in the evenings.

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                  • #39
                    After four days on Forked Lake I think I can safely say that we made it, guys. The bugs of all sorts remind you they exist every once in a while, but open season on humans seems to have passed.

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