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  • chairrock
    replied
    https://www.adirondackdailyenterpris...p-making-rent/

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  • billconner
    replied
    Another adaptive reuse proposal. I applaud the thinking, just not sure of the perception issues. https://www.wwnytv.com/2022/05/27/we...closed-prison/

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  • Zach
    replied
    There is some housing in the villages in the Adirondacks that is old single family homes or duplexes that are abandoned or otherwise unoccupied, and that could be made into usable housing stock again with some effort. That's what I'm doing currently with one house, and I'm sure others are doing similar things. This is not the whole solution to the housing problem, but it could help a little and would also improve the overall condition of the neighborhoods slightly. I think that perhaps the tight housing market is making it more likely for these houses to be bought and repaired since there are fewer other options at an affordable price.

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  • chairrock
    replied
    Originally posted by DuctTape View Post
    One of the main limitations of online forums is the lack of body language and tone. It has been well established by research that people almost always misinterpret tone in written communication especially if they do not know them personally. Research has shown that positive tone in written communication is often misinterpreted as neutral, and neutral language is often misinterpreted as negative. Knowing this, it behooves us all to be cognizant of our word choices, use emojies as a stand-in for body language, and give others the benefit of the doubt.
    Just think of all those kids wearing masks, sitting behind plexiglass partitions, and keeping socially distanced....their social skills must have taken a beating and will continue I fear...Just sayin.....

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  • billconner
    replied
    I posted the article because it seemed unfortunate that the "middle class" residents - firefighters, teachers, carpenters, secretaries, etc. - a segment who along with their kids make the communities culturally richer, we're increasingly being forced to leave for lack of affordable housing.

    No solutions. Some balancing of property taxes to allow people to stay maybe has merit. The dormitory feels a little like the "projects" of the 60s. Just feel like the people forced to leave will be missed.

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  • DuctTape
    replied
    One of the main limitations of online forums is the lack of body language and tone. It has been well established by research that people almost always misinterpret tone in written communication especially if they do not know them personally. Research has shown that positive tone in written communication is often misinterpreted as neutral, and neutral language is often misinterpreted as negative. Knowing this, it behooves us all to be cognizant of our word choices, use emojies as a stand-in for body language, and give others the benefit of the doubt.

    Leave a comment:


  • saabrian
    replied
    Montcalm - Point taken and I bear no ill will either.

    My intention was to use my personal situation as a metaphor for a lot of people in similar situations: people who would happily choose to live and work and volunteer their time and spend most of their money in the Adirondacks as they are now, if there were more reasonable housing options.

    Perhaps you interpreted this to be only about me which was not my intent. The intent was to use my situation as an illustration of the issue, not the issue itself. Sorry if it came across differently.

    If I never am able to move inside the Blue Line, I will be fine. Trust me. And no town is going to collapse because my one self didn't move there.

    But if people want to grow the economy of the Adirondacks and support core communities, then increased housing options for people who want to live and work there (which is a category far more numerous than one) is imperative. That includes both retaining people who already live and work there as well as attracting new ones.

    Not only for the sake of the economy and the work force but also strengthening essential community organizations by replenishing volunteers. Many local officials agree and are working to this end.

    As I said, I agree your dorm suggestion is a good idea and should be part of the solution.
    Last edited by saabrian; 05-27-2022, 02:41 PM.

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  • montcalm
    replied
    Originally posted by saabrian View Post
    Don't be. It's an important discussion. Sometimes, important discussions get messy but they need to happen.
    I have no bad blood.

    I wanted to make it abundantly clear that what I?m arguing is not anything directly benefiting me or my goals but supporting the core communities in the Adirondacks.

    You are free to have a differing opinion on that and unfortunately the idea I was opposing was strongly intermingled with your personal goals.

    I hope you succeed in your dreams but I also hope that you put those that actually need assistance ahead of your own personal objectives.

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  • saabrian
    replied
    Originally posted by billconner View Post
    Well, officially regretful I posted the link.
    Don't be. It's an important discussion. Sometimes, important discussions get messy but they need to happen.

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  • billconner
    replied
    Well, officially regretful I posted the link.

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  • montcalm
    replied
    Brian - I think you need to check your reading comprehension and be less triggered. I said nothing of the sort.


    There’s a big difference between trying to help those afford housing within a community they serve vs housing of those commuting and working remotely.

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  • saabrian
    replied
    Montcalm: "The market is what it is and if left unchecked, the Adirondacks would probably look more like Queensbury"

    Sounds like you also support "limited development (which you secretly love when it fits your motive)."

    I'm sorry you can't see the bigger picture and that you continue to make wrong assumptions based on your grudges. I used my own case as a metaphor for a group of people that is certainly bigger than just me: people who would live and work in the Adks but are held back solely by lack of affordable housing. I did not request any changes other than agreeing with the solution that YOU YOURSELF PROPOSED. It's noteworthy that you imply all kinds of awful things about what I must want but don't specify a single one of those thing that you find threatening.

    I am amazed that you continuously attack me and motives (how dare I want to live and work in the Adirondacks as they are now... what a monster I must be!) for agreeing with a solution that YOU YOURSELF PROPOSED. But I guess some folks must always feel aggrieved or under siege no matter what.

    You are right that we are probably done here. Fortunately, there are serious people trying to deal with these issues.

    Leave a comment:


  • montcalm
    replied
    Again I think you are missing the point, and I think we are done here.

    Everything you have proposed has been about one thing: you. If you can't see beyond that, I can't help you.


    There's nothing wrong with working remotely or commuting from the park. But because of its character you'll have to make some other concession or find a better job that pays you more, or save more money. The market is what it is and if left unchecked, the Adirondacks would probably look more like Queensbury (I don't know about NJ, I've never been - but I knew you would blow that out of proportion and completely miss the point).

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  • saabrian
    replied
    If wanting to live and work in the Adirondacks are not an acceptable reason to move there, I would ask Montcalm to list what are acceptable reasons. Create an application form so that he and the other gatekeepers could vet insolent newcomers.

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  • saabrian
    replied
    You're making incredible assumptions. I feel like you're arguing with your personal caricature of a non-Adirondacker (even though the Blue Line is about 2 miles from my current residence and my part-time job is inside the Blue Line) rather than what I've actually said.

    I like my (full-time) job because it's flexible and has better pay and benefits than most in the Adirondacks. I don't want to change jobs. I want to change where I do that job.

    I would move into the Park precisely because I like it more or less the way it is. Otherwise, why would I move there? I hate New Jersey. I already live in a suburb. I want to move precisely because I'm not a fan of suburban life. I do not expect anything in another town to change because of me.

    I really don't understand your bias against people working remotely. It is a great way to increase full-time residents in the Park, to provide EMS and VFD services and other community groups more volunteers, improve the sales tax base and employment of local businesses.

    I want to live there. I want to spend money there. I want to volunteer there. I want to commit my life there. It just doesn't make sense for me as a single guy to buy a house there (especially in today's market). Why is this so damn "insensitive"?

    YOU were the one who proposed the dorm idea to boost permanent residents - I agreed it was an idea worth pursuing - and yet you're crapping on the motives of the people who would want to take advantage of your good idea.

    I'd rather you be honest and just come out and say, "We don't want anyone here whose great-grandparents didn't live here 100 years ago." While continuing to blame everything on Albany, of course. If you don't want any new residents, fine. Just say so. Stop pretending.

    Leave a comment:

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