Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What does fire damage look like 110 years later?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by montcalm View Post
    It's unfortunate - the beavers make our trails and creeks a little harder to navigate... but the amount of biodiversity they bring is astounding. And as I said before, we don't even know a fraction of it with what happens with soil ecology, but we can see on the macro scale is huge.
    They are truly a wonderful renewable resource that provides many benefits to diversified segments of our world.
    Be careful, don't spread invasive species!!

    When a dog runs at you,whistle for him.
    Henry David Thoreau

    CL50-#23

    Comment


    • #17
      On Tug Hill they are a bane to headwaters trout streams and water quality

      Comment


      • #18
        I can never resist whenever beavers come up...

        https://youtu.be/tbfA5L3YAO0

        Comment


        • #19
          Beavers aren't always an obstacle to stream travel. If the water is low & you're struggling to keep going, in or out of the boat, and you see a nice substantial dam up ahead, it's a beautiful sight.

          Comment


          • #20
            I found some ways to correlate the age of this forest, but I'm not 100% sure I'm understanding the model.

            I think, though, that 50-60 years old seems about right based on soil data and site index models.

            If that's true, something else was happening there for 50-60 years, or something is off about my information or assessment of it being in the forest preserve, and it was logged in that era.

            Comment


            • #21
              USGS Quad of 1912:

              https://maps.lib.utexas.edu/maps/top...eever-1912.jpg

              A couple interesting notes:

              - the truck trail (wagon road) existed at that time.
              - the entire burned area is shown on this map in white/tan. This denotes a cleared area and this being shortly after the fire, this area was mostly barren.


              1958 map shows the first part of the road being improved from Thendara to the shoulder of Moose River mtn at about 2000'. There used to be a fire tower there, so I'm guessing that road was improved for access to the tower by an observer. I'm not sure when the tower was constructed, by my guess would be sometime between 1912 and 1958. It was removed in 1977 to conform with the new wilderness designation.
              Last edited by montcalm; 03-17-2022, 09:48 PM.

              Comment


              • #22
                The area burned in 1903 - most of the burned area transferred to the state in 1904. I'm not entirely sure that the beginning of the truck trail was in that transfer, although from what I could muster from the UMP, it was.

                Fire tower erected in 1919, improved road built in the 1930s by the CCC.

                https://adirondackwilderness.org/ha-...ah-wilderness/



                So maybe that puts those roadside yellow birch in the 90 yo range if they came in with the trail construction and grading.
                Last edited by montcalm; 03-17-2022, 09:45 PM.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Beavers teeth grow constantly, being rodents. Their tooth roots go back into their heads, curved for about 5 inches into their sinus cavities. Their castor glands are used in perfume and in food stuffs. I love beavers, they love new growth from burned areas in the forest. Their pelts are very popular with folks who prefer a renewable resource versus polyester oil products. Their meat is supposed to be tasty, they say... they look like rats with BIG tails to me....
                  Be careful, don't spread invasive species!!

                  When a dog runs at you,whistle for him.
                  Henry David Thoreau

                  CL50-#23

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    These historic fires, and the fire map show some great trends on fire here in the east. Even though it was excessively dry when those fires broke out, many were caused by humans, particularly railroads. You can see a direct link the the edge of fire and presence of a rail. This also goes along with the fact that the most intensive logging was done near rails by this era.

                    One interesting thing I noticed last night on the 1912 McKeever map is that there was a short rail from McKeever to Remsen Falls, where there was a logging camp. This was one of the first logging operations to really take advantage of rail to directly transport logs to a mill (the mill being in McKeever).

                    But this really shows a question I had earlier about wetlands and ponds being a natural fire break and how well fire propagates in an unbroken forest without slash. The fire around Ha-de-ron-dah clearly shows Big Otter Lake acted as a fire stop to the north. A number of other factors such as unbroken forest, denuded areas and wetlands seemed to help contain the fire, but even so, it still was able to burn over a number of wetlands and small ponds, where there likely had been considerable logging slash.

                    Looking at an overview of the map, one can see that fires really only took over vast areas on the fringes of the 1892 park and penetrating the interior only where there had been some recent logging activity and some slash involved.
                    Last edited by montcalm; 03-18-2022, 10:20 AM.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X