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  • Under the fast lanes

    Anywhere that still carries TCD's book Life under the fast lane.
    Last edited by Tabe; 08-27-2020, 10:03 AM.

  • #2
    Have you checked the Mountaineer?

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    • #3
      Asking for a friend who just moved to N Hudson,he checked there with no luck.

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      • #4
        I bought it at Mountaineer last year. Might try the HPIC or the ADK store in Lake George.

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        • #5
          Mountaineer still has a few copies.

          I don't plan on another printing - it was a lot of work, and I had to do it all myself.

          A few areas have seen some changes. The forest road to the Wyman Hill and Squaw Mountain culverts has been "improved" as part of the State "Frontiertown trail" and now looks a little different, although in general the river crossings and culverts are the same.

          Also, Dirgylot Hill has been developed with some state signage. There may be other changes since 2010, when I did the research for this.

          Maybe next year, if I have time and motivation, I may put together a "supplement" and post it here just to capture the updates.

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          • #6
            You might also find a copy at the Crossroads General Store at exit 25.

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            • #7
              Also, the Lindsay Brook access has changed considerably due to beaver activity- the old road bed is underwater for what appears to be at least a 10th of a mile. Getting around it, as I understand it, requires a true bushwhack plus a ford of the Schroon River.

              This was once a marked and maintained DEC trail as far as the Northway underpass but the trail has now been fully abandoned by the DEC.

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              • #8
                Thanks, DSettahr. Yes, beavers have inundated the original route, as they do routinely. And my book describes the best alternative to cross the river and bushwhack to join the original route.

                And yes, the original route has been abandoned by the state. The old "trail closed" sign has even been removed. But hope remains: The Hammond Pond Wild Forest UMP includes a plan to build a new route to the Lindsay Brook culvert, as a branch trail from the climber's path to the Deadwater cliffs. I have volunteered to help with this, when DEC is ready to do it, as I am quite familiar with the terrain.

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                • #9
                  I think any new trail from the Deadwater area to the Northway should follow the old Sharp roadbed which Abraham Sharp made to sell veggies to the workers at Deadwater. It goes from the old village of Deadwater to Gui Pond and then passes the remains of Abraham Sharp's farm...Fun from a history point of view and pretty direct...

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                  • #10
                    Hi Festus,

                    Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Trails that make use of old road beds are often better graded and better drained, and hold up better than trails that are "newly carved" through the woods.

                    Can you post a map showing where that old roadbed runs?

                    Thanks.

                    Tom

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TCD View Post
                      Hi Festus,

                      Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Trails that make use of old road beds are often better graded and better drained, and hold up better than trails that are "newly carved" through the woods.

                      Can you post a map showing where that old roadbed runs?

                      Thanks.

                      Tom
                      I'd love to see that also.

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                      • #12
                        Has anyone had any luck finding a copy?

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                        • #13
                          The book has been out of print for a few years now. I doubt there are very many, if any copies remaining at the couple retail outlets that carried it. Only 200 copies were printed. Most were sold through The Mountaineer. I recall that I did wholesale a few copies to Crossroads (near exit 25). Maybe ask them if they have any left?

                          This book was always intended for a narrow audience, so it was not picked up for publication by ADK or other publishers. Self-publishing is a ton of work, and an unprofitable "labor of love." (When it was all done I actually lost a small (inconsequential) amount of money on the project.)

                          So I don't plan another printing, as I said upthread.

                          If a publisher wanted to pick this up and print a second edition, I would help with the field research, and I would sell them the original manuscript. That's a pretty unlikely scenario, though...

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                          • #14
                            Yeah sadly guidebooks seem to be becoming a thing of the past. My own contributions to the “Discover” series in the North Hudson area never even got published. After all, who needs to buy a guidebook these days when you have the internet, hiking related apps, and countless hiking & bushwhacking related Facebook groups.

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                            • #15
                              Still use mine...

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