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Number 1 Camp Steam Boiler (Watson's East Triangle)

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  • montcalm
    replied
    I don't think we'll have to do much worry about anyone removing that boiler anytime soon. And NY probably has tax records for all those lands from the logging era.

    I'd be much more concerned about older artifacts from early explorers or natives.

    Hopefully the ones like the boiler serve as a reminder as how not to manage the forests; until they turn into dust. I'd guess it would take a good long time for that one to break down to small iron oxide fragments.

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  • DSettahr
    replied
    To be fair, it's also not easy to come up with wording for a legal document that allows for interpretation on what constitutes something as "historic" or not based on human emotion. Age of an object is much more objective and not as subject to interpretation if and when it becomes necessary for these matters to be examined in court.

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  • montcalm
    replied
    Rather a moving target.

    I can see why archeologists would want to be conservative and not have people mess with “artifacts”. But there’s definitely some grey area as to when enough is enough. I bet there’s a couple canoes out there coming up on the 50 year mark as well.

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  • DSettahr
    replied
    The so called "50 year rule" has nothing to do with the APA.

    Rather, 50 years is the general rule that has often been applied across the board throughout the US with regards to whether something is an "historic artifact" and is worthy of preservation efforts and/or protection. While the specific language of laws regarding protection of historic artifacts varies from one jurisdiction to the next, 50 years has often been the norm with regards to defining what constitutes an artifact for the purposes of the law or regulation- that number shows up quite frequently in laws/regulations on the subject from one state to the next, and also at the federal level.

    I'm not entirely sure where the idea originated that "50 years" was the appropriate time limit, but some googling lead me to a source that indicates that it first showed up in a 1952 amendment to the federal Historic Sites Act of 1935.

    There's been some discussion recently that it may be time to rethink 50 years as an appropriate limit for what makes something historic. At present, we're looking at items from the early 70s coming up on "historic" status and gaining legal protections. There's a whole lot of trash (discarded beer cans) out there in the ADK backcountry that is about to gain legal protections, if it hasn't already. And the age of disposable plastics gaining the same isn't far off.

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  • montcalm
    replied
    I wonder if the 50 years has anything to do with APA formation and when this kind of thing would have started to be regulated.

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  • montcalm
    replied
    Oh for sure - who knows if they are still in business. They "should have" been held responsible.

    That chunk of iron is probably not hurting much though. Other "junk" left, not-so-much (not really much of an issue in the ADKs though, thankfully).

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  • Wldrns
    replied
    Just try to hold any originial company to that standard now. I've heard it unofficially said that, if you come across artifacts that are 50 or more years old, then they are to be preserved as historically valuable. Newer stuff is trash to be removed.There are tons and tons of those old dumps and abandoned machinery out there from logging years long past.

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  • montcalm
    replied
    Originally posted by MTVhike View Post
    Is this an historic object to be preserved or trash to be removed?
    Depends on your perspective.

    If you hold companies to the same standard that you do an individual... they carried it in, they can carry it out.

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  • MTVhike
    replied
    Is this an historic object to be preserved or trash to be removed?

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  • Wldrns
    replied
    Originally posted by Northcountryman View Post
    oh ok, Western slope--got it.
    Not many slopes of much significance in the area. Which makes it most interesting to navigate by compass and visual terrain observation.

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  • Northcountryman
    replied
    oh ok, Western slope--got it.

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  • Wldrns
    replied
    Originally posted by Northcountryman View Post
    Interesting, and where is this located? Never heard of it before
    The Watson's East Triangle Complex includes approximately 43,000 acres of Forest Preserve and conservation easement lands that are almost entirely within the Adirondack Park.


    It's one of my favorite remote areas to explore by bushwack using only map and compass.

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  • Northcountryman
    replied
    Interesting, and where is this located? Never heard of it before

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  • Huezee
    replied
    Very cool. Thank you! God, I'm such a geek.

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  • Wldrns
    replied
    Found them!
    Attached Files

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