Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Disappearance of Douglas Legg

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Disappearance of Douglas Legg

    This story has long interested and saddened me. I was wondering if anyone had any info. or theories as to what might have happened. I'm especially interested in those who remember the ordeal, or are familiar with the Santanoni/Newcomb area. The disappearance took place years before I was born, and while I have read some info. on it, I still feel somewhat left in the dark. -GG
    http://www.adkwildernessguide.com

  • #2
    Do you have a link to the story?
    "If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it." Lyndon B. Johnson

    Comment


    • #3
      It's the second story down: http://www.pressrepublican.com/Archi.../110719992.htm

      Dad spent several days looking for him.
      --"Pete You***?!, Pete You***'s grandson?!...That name is nearly sacred & uttered with awe in THIS house!" : The late Dr. Reed's wife, upon entering her house & being introduced- so to converse with her husband about the old days, a little before he died. The kind of greeting you'll never forget & reinforces your image of the hero you never met. --

      Comment


      • #4
        I was camping with my family in 1971 at Lake Harris campsite in Newcomb when Douglas Legg disappeared. I was seven but remember the search being a big deal in Newcomb. My father and brother assisted in the search by dragging Newcomb Lake. There is a book about the history of Camp Santanoni called Santanoni, From Japanese Temple to Life at an Adirondack Great Camp and here is a link to it: http://www.adirondack-books.com/santanoni.html. It contains a lengthy chapter on the search for Douglas Legg and is a very interesting book.

        I suspect he walked for miles beyond the search area and died of hypothermia. It was a sad event for sure. Every time I go to the Camp, I think of it and wonder what happened to him.

        Comment


        • #5
          I remember camping that summer in Johnsburg during the Garrow search as a kid....my Grandfather, myself and a family friend were quite nervous when we found out he was somewhere in the area.....Wells is "just over the hills" from where we were.

          Needless to say, we didn't venture too far from the lake..
          "If You Ain't the Lead Dog,
          The Scenery Never Changes"

          (Age Old Yukon Saying)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by pondhopper
            It's the second story down: http://www.pressrepublican.com/Archi.../110719992.htm

            Dad spent several days looking for him.
            Good link Pondhopper! I was amazed as I read through all the stories, the fact the search teams found skeletons of other hikers that were missing during the search for the lost individuals. Makes me wonder how many people are laying out there in the woods...
            The Wilderness Photography of Gary F. Dean
            facebook photography of Gary F. Dean

            It's Not A Map...It's a "To-Do" List!

            Comment


            • #7
              I wonder the same thing, Gary. I wonder, is there a site that lists missing hikers in the ADKs?

              I first heard of the Legg story back in the mid-nineties when supposedly the Navy guy came forth claiming he saw a skelelton. It came back to the front of my mind when I read about it again in James R. Burnsides' Exploring the 46 Adirondack High Peaks. The disappearance is mentioned in the chapter on Colden, if I'm not mistaken, (the author and his son were out hiking a couple of days after the boy disappeared) and Burnside describes how rangers were telling hikers to keep a lookout for the kid as he had reportedly been seen begging for food, and even raiding people's camps, and at that time they believed he was hiding out in the moutains. Supposedly the boy was big for his age, so they surmised he was upset about something, and had the strength to hide out since he new the moutains fairly well. It's hard to believe an eight year old would do that, but it's interesting to see the way the situation was being handled back then.

              My great uncle helped out with the search, and he claimed that after a while it became almost a media circus, and the searches were poorly organized at times. He also said many felt someone in the family may have killed the boy. One thing is for certain, it is a haunting story, and whenever I go to the High Peaks, Douglas, and so many other hikers who never made it back, are on my mind.
              http://www.adkwildernessguide.com

              Comment


              • #8
                The thing to remember about many of those "missing" hikers is that they were experienced people who felt their experience allowed them to cut corners a novice wouldn't.

                It's so easy to step a few feet off the trail and get lost up here especially from late spring to early fall when there is so much ground cover. That's why compass and map are always necessary.
                "If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it." Lyndon B. Johnson

                Comment


                • #9
                  I only heard parts of the story and I heard that the case settled down, and then somebody wrote a book about it, and was interviewing the Uncle and somehow people started believing that the uncle murdered the boy and then sold camp santanoni. Yeah, I really have no idea what I just said, but it was told to me this summer while on the trail.

                  shaggy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Rockefeller funding to develop a search and rescue program, mentioned in the article, also resulted in the designation of the Forest Rangers to be the responsible agency for the training and execution of searches in the state. Prior to that, there was no single agency responsible. In other states without a designated agency, you will often see a real circus when there is a search, with often poorly trained law enforcement agencies competing instead of working together. Volunteer organizations in other states are often times responsible for running searches. New York's model works very, very well.

                    I had remebered that the Legg boy had learning disabilities, but that article doesn't mention that so maybe my memory is faulty again......
                    'I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself, than be crowded on a velvet cushion.' - Henry David Thoreau

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That probably explains why the search was supposedly circus-like, since it took place before, or actually helped establish, the new protocol.
                      http://www.adkwildernessguide.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gray Ghost
                        That probably explains why the search was supposedly circus-like, since it took place before, or actually helped establish, the new protocol.
                        True, and even today there are very few states that are truly prepared or co-ordinated for SAR. Even New York State has a long way to go. I think there are about four or five states that have good programs in place.

                        Please don't construe what I have said as a criticism of any SAR people or the Rangers. The problem is not with them but with the overall organization and co-ordination (or lack thereof) of the agencies involved.

                        I think on a 1-10 basis, NY State is bout a 7. Which considering the overall preparedness is quite good.

                        Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and Washington State are probably the top five.
                        "If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it." Lyndon B. Johnson

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I was a camper at Deerfoot Lodge (boys camp), just outside Speculator ,when Garrow was on the loose. He actually stole the car from our camp. It was one of the counselors cars. I heard that when Garrow was shot and caught he was wearing a shirt that was in the car.I was very young but I remember the troopers combing the camp with bloodhounds,roadblocks,and headcounts on a regular basis. Anybody think this would make a great movie? I know it makes a great campfire story for the kids when camping!
                          " A Trout is just too damn valuable to be caught only once."
                          Lee Wulff

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My in-laws live just down the road from where Garrow grew up and the mine where he hid the girl's body. I've seen the mine myself. Scary times.

                            Douglas Legg I'm afraid may remain a mystery. It's too bad they don't really scour that island (or whatever it is called) to search for his body. I guess they were short of funds the last time they looked.
                            http://www.adkwildernessguide.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I found this old article on Garrow, interesting read.



                              http://www.hamconews.com/text/2003/1.../garr/garr.asp

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X