Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Maps showing predominant tree type?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Maps showing predominant tree type?

    Does anyone know of maps that show the typical type of tree that dominates the forest?

    I'm interested in doing some bushwhacking backpacking trips, but not in fighting my way through extensive spruce traps.

    I have not much information showing whether, for example, Sentinel Range Wilderness is a single massive spruce trap, or if Siamese Ponds Wilderness has a more open understory.

    What's the best way to identify areas of the park with passable understories before a trip?

  • #2
    Originally posted by VermontDacker View Post

    I have not much information showing whether, for example, Sentinel Range Wilderness is a single massive spruce trap, or if Siamese Ponds Wilderness has a more open understory.
    Both those examples are generally true, FYI. (Although there are exceptions in both areas.)

    I've found that the best way to plan a route (regarding tree type) is with satellite photos taken in the early spring. The evergreen and deciduous areas are extremely obvious.

    I often look at this site before heading out:

    http://essex-gis.co.essex.ny.us/

    Select the base map "NYS Orthoimagery 2017" for the best resolution. I also use "NYS Orthoimagery 2009" when I am looking for ice climbs; the resolution is not as good, but it was taken earlier in the spring, and the residual ice is still evident.

    (This site also helps by showing property boundaries. A caveat; the property boundaries are often mislocated, sometimes by a couple hundred yards. So the boundaries are a planning tool, but you have to find the actual property lines on the ground.)

    Other counties, such as Warren and Hamilton, have similar sites.

    Comment


    • #3
      TCD,

      Thanks, this does look useful. I'm having some challenges figuring out how to display state-owned vs. privately owned boundaries, but for purposes of general planning, this is probably close enough.

      Comment


      • #4
        In the County gis sites, click on the parcel, and a pop up will display the information (ownership, size of parcel, etc.) Sometimes you have to click twice to get the info to pop up; the software is apparently fickle.

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree on the use of aerials, especially when they are coupled with good topo maps. There is plenty of literature on ecological communities of the Adirondacks, NYS, and the Northeast. Try the NY Natural Heritage Program, Jenkins, Ketchledge, and Kudish...those are a few that come to mind...Historical accounts of past events like fires and blow downs may also be helpful

          Comment

          Working...
          X