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How do grizzly bears know that humans aren't food?

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  • Glen
    replied
    Originally posted by Schultzz View Post
    Hey Glen why aren't you fishing in Montauk Bay for false Albacore?
    That starts in a few weeks. The boat is all ready for action.

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  • Schultzz
    replied
    Hey Glen why aren't you fishing in Montauk Bay for false Albacore?

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  • Woodly
    replied
    Originally posted by Glen View Post
    That's a real picture of me Woodly! lol

    I think it's an old postcard I saw somewhere and took a pic of it.
    Pretty cool pic for sure.
    That's what I use for bait

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  • Glen
    replied
    Originally posted by Woodly View Post
    Hey Glen, How old is your avatar photo and from where?
    That's a real picture of me Woodly! lol

    I think it's an old postcard I saw somewhere and took a pic of it.

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  • Woodly
    replied
    Hey Glen, How old is your avatar photo and from where?

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  • Glen
    replied
    They're animals, therefore unpredictable. Bring bear spray, stop analyzing and have a good time. You have a good shot as spotting wolves in Lamar Valley as well.

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  • forest dweller
    replied
    So I'd like to go deeper into this. I want to backpack in Lamar Valley in Yellowstone with my wife...How do grizzly bears especially know that humans in a tent aren't food even if they get curious? Serious question. How do they associate a human with danger if you are deep in the backcountry and that particular bear never personally had a bad experience with a human?
    Last edited by forest dweller; 08-15-2020, 12:08 AM.

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  • Dave Bourque
    replied
    NYSDEC's recommendations to reduce bear conflicts.

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  • Dave Bourque
    replied
    Just sharing a video that I took 3 years ago at Siyeh Pass in Glacier National Park. We were about 5 miles from the closest road. He/she looked right at us and then did this little "dance". The bear was about 100' away. We had pepper spray but a strong wind was coming right at us rendering it useless. Strangely, I wasn't afraid. It was more like "extremely alert". He/she wandered off, unfortunately in the direction we had to go. Fortunately we did not see it again. This video was a big "hit" with the park rangers that night.

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  • timberghost
    replied
    From what I was told and the little I understand, most bears are solitary animals while most humans are herd/pack animals.
    Bears don't go after a pack of coyotes or wolves, while they can and will kill a stray given the chance.

    Bruins are smarter then pigs and know a lot more then we think they're capable of. However, most bears certainly know that where there's one human there are or will be many more.

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  • Blackflie
    replied
    Originally posted by Woodly View Post
    That's why they invented BĂ©arnaise sauce.
    I'll get your coat

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  • Woodly
    replied
    Originally posted by DuctTape View Post
    we probably taste like crap.
    That's why they invented BĂ©arnaise sauce.

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  • Schultzz
    replied
    Originally posted by Wldrns View Post
    The question of carrying a firearm for protection was asked for the Yukon River canoe races. Assuming you had the proper permits to carry, it could be done, but there is a catch. Assuming you kill a bear for self defense out of season and without a license, you are required to bring the carcass to the closest official station of the provence if in the Yukon Territory or the state if in Alaska. The rub is, depending on where you are, the closest location could be as much as 100 miles or more upstream against a 6mph current. AFAIK, no one ever carried the question any further. We saw many bears of both types on the river bank, and even had some tracks at our random campsites, but we never had any problems with them. All our food was required to be in hard sided certified bear resistant canisters, as substantial tall trees of any size are lacking near the Arctic Circle.
    Thanks for the update Paul.

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  • Wldrns
    replied
    The question of carrying a firearm for protection was asked for the Yukon River canoe races. Assuming you had the proper permits to carry, it could be done, but there is a catch. Assuming you kill a bear for self defense out of season and without a license, you are required to bring the carcass to the closest official station of the provence if in the Yukon Territory or the state if in Alaska. The rub is, depending on where you are, the closest location could be as much as 100 miles or more upstream against a 6mph current. AFAIK, no one ever carried the question any further. We saw many bears of both types on the river bank, and even had some tracks at our random campsites, but we never had any problems with them. All our food was required to be in hard sided certified bear resistant canisters, as substantial tall trees of any size are lacking near the Arctic Circle.

    Leave a comment:


  • Schultzz
    replied
    Some states have reciprocity which honors that state's gun permit. Montana honors PA but I don't think NY. But if they do you can carry a large caliber gun if that makes you feel better. But... you had better know how to use it and not be afraid to fire. Or... you can bring bear spray and back up bear spray. Grizzlies will generally keep their distance unless you pi$$ them off, or surprise them/ Then bear spray will send them packing, but its effect wears off soon. Female Black Bears come into estrus every two years and will attract male bears from great distances. So urinating can achieve the opposite effect for horny male bears attracted by a female who is "ready". Just follow the normal precautions and bring bear spray and you will be fine, including grizzlies.

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