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  • Tree identification quiz.

    How many can you ID?
    A couple are represented twice.
    http://adkhighpeaks.com/neil/outdoor...ees/index.html
    Clicking on the full-size images links to the next in the series.
    The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.

  • #2
    Some people are barking up the wrong tree.
    This quest was NOT treemendously difficult.
    Last edited by Schultzz; 05-17-2016, 01:48 PM.
    Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.

    Comment


    • #3
      #1 Fraxinus americana
      #2 Pretty sure it is a Picea, probably Picea rubens but could be Picea mariana
      #3 Fraxinus americana
      #4 Tsuga canadensis
      #5 Tsuga canadensis
      #6 Betula papyrifera
      #7 Betula papyrifera
      #8 Ostrya virginiana
      #9 Thuja occidentalis
      #10 Probably also a Picea, again going with Picea rubens but could be Picea mariana
      #11 Betula alleghaniensis
      #12 Fraxinus americana

      Not 100% sure on all of these but pretty sure on most of them.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you google Fraxinus and Acer sacharum and look at the bark you'll see they can be fairly similar. I thought #3 was Fraxinus too but now I'm not so sure. There is only one Tsuga in the lot AFAIK.

        I thought #1 was most likely an Acer rubrum (Red Maple). I had some help from leaves on the ground. :-)

        There are two Hemlocks.
        The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.

        Comment


        • #5
          #1 is very ambiguous looking (to me). My first guess is White Ash since we have some here that have done something like that. If I was in the woods and needed to identify that tree before cutting it I would look at the pattern of the branches. White ash and maple of any kind have very distinct branch differences from each other. I often end up having to look at the whole tree, in the woods, or if someone brings me a log to saw and they want to know what it is I can tell once I open it up.
          Zach

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Neil View Post
            If you google Fraxinus and Acer sacharum and look at the bark you'll see they can be fairly similar. I thought #3 was Fraxinus too but now I'm not so sure. There is only one Tsuga in the lot AFAIK.

            I thought #1 was most likely an Acer rubrum (Red Maple). I had some help from leaves on the ground. :-)

            There are two Hemlocks.
            Only one Tsuga but two hemlocks?

            I don't think any of those are maples. Sugar maple can become furrowed with age but it is never that regular. And sugar maple would be unusual to find at a higher elevation on a mountain. Red maple never gets that deeply furrowed.

            White ash leaves tend to decompose quickly and aren't visible by spring.

            Did you happen to take any photos of the branches? With a clear photo, it would be pretty clear from a glance whether they were ashes or maples.
            Last edited by DSettahr; 05-16-2016, 04:00 PM.

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            • #7
              Elevation was about 1500 feet. There were lots of Maple leaves on the ground.

              I only have the bark photos.
              The clues to the Hemlocks (I think) are the reddish tinge to the bark. One is a young Hemlock , which at first I thought was a Red Spruce until I saw the needles.
              The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.

              Comment


              • #8
                I meant the confusion about there being only "one Tsuga" but "two hemlocks." Tsuga is the hemlock genus, so I am still a bit confused by this.

                I'm sure there were maples growing in the area. I'm sticking with ash for #1, #3, and #12, though. The characteristic interlacing, even spacing, and deepness of the furrows just screams ash.

                #12 could possibly be Quercus rubra, but that would be a little bit of a stretch in terms of both the bark characteristics and the spatial distribution of the species (although not impossible).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ash for #1 seems a stretch, but you know way more than I do!
                  I didn't realize that Hemlock is Tsuga sp. I was wondering what you were smoking.
                  I suspect #10 is a Hemlock (based on the needles).

                  I don't know about #2 although Picea makes most sense.
                  The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    #10 was the one I was least sure on. I wouldn't doubt that it was a hemlock. #4 and #5 appear to be hemlocks as well.

                    As a general rule (and with the exception of a few species with distinct characteristics), I usually don't base tree ID on bark alone- there is just too much variability, and some species that are just too similar to be sure.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      5 is a Red Pine.
                      The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It could be. Something about that bark doesn't seem quite right. Do you have uncropped versions of these photos?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DSettahr View Post
                          #1 Fraxinus americana
                          #2 Pretty sure it is a Picea, probably Picea rubens but could be Picea mariana
                          #3 Fraxinus americana
                          #4 Tsuga canadensis
                          #5 Tsuga canadensis
                          #6 Betula papyrifera
                          #7 Betula papyrifera
                          #8 Ostrya virginiana
                          #9 Thuja occidentalis
                          #10 Probably also a Picea, again going with Picea rubens but could be Picea mariana
                          #11 Betula alleghaniensis
                          #12 Fraxinus americana

                          Not 100% sure on all of these but pretty sure on most of them.

                          They're all Latin to me!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            1 White Pine
                            2 Ginko
                            3 Tree of Heaven
                            4 Joshua
                            5 redwood
                            6 Sequoia
                            7 Dogwood ( you can tell by the bark)
                            8 Chestnut
                            9 Mulberry
                            10 American Elm
                            11 Bald Cypress
                            12 Sugar Pine

                            How many did I get right?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dundee View Post
                              1 White Pine
                              2 Ginko
                              3 Tree of Heaven
                              4 Joshua
                              5 redwood
                              6 Sequoia
                              7 Dogwood ( you can tell by the bark)
                              8 Chestnut
                              9 Mulberry
                              10 American Elm
                              11 Bald Cypress
                              12 Sugar Pine

                              How many did I get right?
                              The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.

                              Comment

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