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Old 02-11-2008, 04:05 AM   #1
danceswithflies
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Pocket Rocket Windscreen

After years of faithful service from my Coleman Peak 1 stove, I've gotten tired of hauling its bulk around and purchased an MSR Pocket Rocket. (I won't miss the excitement of the Coleman's tendency to unexpectedly flare up, either!).

It looks like some sort of auxiliary windscreen will be mandatory with the msr. Can anyone offer some suggestions? War stories?

Thanks.
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Old 02-11-2008, 06:44 AM   #2
whitefoot
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I have the same one and never really felt the need for a wind screen, the MSR works like a little blow torch, sometimes the wind blows the flame around a little but its never blown out, ive been useing the same stove for about 5 or 6 yrs. never had a problem w/ it.

But if you want you could make one out of rolled roofing flashing, I made one for my alcohole stove where you definatally need a wind screen, it rolls up and fits right inside of my cook pot along with the stove.
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:19 AM   #3
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At the dollar store buy a disposable aluminum oven liner pan. Cut it into the rectangular strip you need. You will probably get 2 or 3 windscreens out of a single pan.
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:20 AM   #4
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Be careful when fashioning a windsreen for an attached canister stove. One of the reasons they are not recommended is because of the risk of overheating the canister and causing an explosion.

The pocketrocket has a mini windscreen around the burner for that purpose. It doesn't do much. You might be able to devise a better one that sits above the canister and just protects the burner, but you should not use a windscreen around that canister.

The instructions for the pocketrocket state:

"DO NOT use any windscreen with the stove. Any windscreen, including a standard MSR windscreen, may cause the canister to explode"

You can read the instructions here:

http://www.msrgear.com/support/pdfs/pocketrocket.pdf

The quote is under the "Warnings" section.
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:43 AM   #5
DEEPFOREST
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Originally Posted by timetohike View Post
Be careful when fashioning a windsreen for an attached canister stove. One of the reasons they are not recommended is because of the risk of overheating the canister and causing an explosion.

The pocketrocket has a mini windscreen around the burner for that purpose. It doesn't do much. You might be able to devise a better one that sits above the canister and just protects the burner, but you should not use a windscreen around that canister.

The instructions for the pocketrocket state:

"DO NOT use any windscreen with the stove. Any windscreen, including a standard MSR windscreen, may cause the canister to explode"

You can read the instructions here:

http://www.msrgear.com/support/pdfs/pocketrocket.pdf

The quote is under the "Warnings" section.

Ditto to the above.
windscreens + canister = disatser
Use or create a spot with minimal wind when using it.
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Old 02-28-2008, 11:06 AM   #6
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I find that using a windscreen greatly improves the efficiency of my gas canister stove. I use two different wind screens depending on the season. During three season use, I use one that redirects the heat upwards so that the canister is never surrounded. (First link below has an example). For winter use, I have a wraparound windscreen and always monitor the temperature of the canister. I have been able to use my canister stove effectively and with no problems at temperatures so far as low as minus 10 degrees F. In addition to the windscreen, I also use some blue foam as an insulated base for the canister. I basically only boil water for hot drinks and dehydrated dinners. Keeping it simple helps. I constantly touch the canister to see if it is too warm and never, ever leave the stove running unattended. I never need it to run more than a few minutes anyway. Yes, I have to keep a vigil watch, sleep with my canister and look for running streams, but for me I find these tradeoffs well worth not messing with priming the stove, dealing with fuel and the extra weight/bulk of white gas stoves. Both my stove and gas canister fit inside my MSR kettle and all three easily weigh less than a pound. It is nice knowing that within a few minutes of me getting out of my sleeping bag, I can easily have a hot drink or meal to warm me up on those extra cold mornings. During three season use I find that using a windscreen usually cuts my fuel consumption in half (of course it depends on the conditions).

The following link has lots of information using windscreens with canister stoves:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...ght/00041.html

Hereís a link that suggests it works for others as well:

http://www.viewsfromthetop.com/forum...ad.php?t=20434


And hereís a great link about stoves in general:

http://zenstoves.net

I would never recommend to anyone that they donít follow the manufacturer instructions, guidelines or safety information. What works for me might/might not work for you. Iím a big believer in HYOH as long as it doesnít interfere with nature or others. In addition, my friend always brings his Whisperlite during the winter months and we usually are never more than a few miles from the trailhead anyway. I have been using this method for the past two winters and I have never needed to borrow his stove in all sorts of cold temperatures. My intent is only to provide some information about using windscreens. If I knew it was going to be consistently super cold (minus 20 degrees F. or less) or had to melt snow for water than I would probably take my Primus Varifuel as well. More than likely I would just not venture out in those temperatures.

Disclaimer: This information should be used at your own risk, realizing that there exists the possibility of canister overheating or permanent stove damage that could result in property loss, injury or death. I accept no responsibility with what you do with the information provided. (Geez Ė I so dislike lawyer speak)
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Old 02-28-2008, 01:48 PM   #7
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I've been using a windscreen around my superfly for some time.

I did what was listed above only I decided that the pan liner was too fragile (mine ripped and cracked).

So I bought some industrial strength alum foil.

You can cut holes out of the bottom if you need to for venting heat.

As far as canister stoves, they are expensive to run. But in the winter I use mine as a hanging kit. It works incredibly well, and increases camping effeciency. I typically have to bring on even the coldest winter trips a 100wt fleece, a primaloft jacket and my goretex for insulating layers. No extra clothing required to stay warm at camp.

Anyway, we have camped and melted snow in -25F ambient temps using both the liquid fuel, and the canister.
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Old 02-28-2008, 02:14 PM   #8
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Interesting.
Thanks for the links ADKfun!
I might have to try that out
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Old 02-28-2008, 09:33 PM   #9
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But in the winter I use mine as a hanging kit.
Just curious, how do you avoid getting snow all over everything when you're melting snow with the stove hanging in the tent? Since it takes so much snow to melt a full pot of water, I gradually add snow to the pot while its on the stove. I just scoop up a bunch of snow with the pot lid and dump it on the pot, and not all of it actually ends up in the pot. Do you bring the pot outside the tent to add snow, or are you just more careful about getting it all into the pot?

Sorry for the threadjack.
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Old 02-29-2008, 06:37 AM   #10
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Ahh, this is where my genius shows. I too have the same issue, snow doesn't quite make it in the pot. So my partner this past weekend sort of thought I was an idiot for the 1 cup measuring cup until he saw it in action.

We used an MSR Titan pot (his pot, toooo much money for me) which was 1 L or 1.25L, it fit quite well in the hanging kit, and I prefered it to my larger pots because it essentially holds less, and puts a bit less stress on the tent. It also concentrates the heat better since it's a smaller surface and titanium isn't a great conductor.

Anyway, to the question. The 1 cup measuring cup did double duty. We filled a trash bag with snow (stuff sacks work as well) and simply left it in the vestibule, then we'd scoop a few scoop fulls at a time and add each to the pot, when it was time to drain some water we'd use the scoop some more. This led to almost no spills (aside from the 16oz of tea), and pretty much no snow in the tent. It also made measuring our water for freeze dried dinners quite easy.

The cup also meant the pot could stay on the stove 100% of the time. Further reducing wasted gas and spillage.

I'm actually going to write a blog writeup on the hanging stove, and keeping canisters running in the cold but the above is key IMO to keeping everything running smoothly.

it took 2.5 4oz canisters (actually 1 was a 3.5oz) to melt snow for 2 days for 2 people in about 10F to 0F temps. The 3.5 also leaked at the start (my fault, DO NOT PUT THE HAND/FOOT WARMER ON THE CANISTER BEFORE ATTACHING IT TO THE STOVE, I assume this was what happened). So probably 2 4oz fuel cartridges per day (3 to be safe). This really isn't out of line with the Whisperlight or XGK which supposedly need 4oz/person/day to melt snow. My experience is this is about right, a 22oz bottle for 2 nights.

But the truth is provided you don't mind being in the tent, in terms of effeciency this is by far the most effecient way to camp while going light. My only insulating layers never came out of the stuff sacks (a 100wt fleece and a primaloft jacket) and my goretex was completely dry by the time we went to bed. Dave was even able to dry a pair of insulated gloves out in the 3.5 hours we spent cooking and melting. This was with all the vents open, and both doors 25-50% open. It hit 36F in the tent, and it was only about 5F outside.

But a word of caution make sure you vent, and be aware that even canister stoves can flare up. Be very careful when lighting them and warming the canister.
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Old 02-29-2008, 09:30 AM   #11
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Just a word of warning about the stove inside the tent.

Be aware that if you just applied a waterproofing to the tent, in some cases it may be highly flammable. Sometimes just a spark can cause it to ignite in a fireball.

I saw evidence of this with a recovery. It ain't pretty.

I imagine that waterproofing materials have become mush safer since them, but I would check on the flammability as well as give it several days to dry well before using a stove inside the tent.

Hawk
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Old 02-29-2008, 10:14 AM   #12
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. But in the winter I use mine as a hanging kit..
Do you have any links that show that set up? Thanks.
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Old 02-29-2008, 02:17 PM   #13
pico23
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Do you have any links that show that set up? Thanks.
For now only this...



I will/can take some shots of the setup itself but it's probably tough to find at this time, when I located mine 2 years ago it was in short supply.

Some people didn't like it, because of the 4 wires. I actually solved the problem with the scoop so the wires don't cause any problems since I don't remove the pot. Sometimes solutions are so simple people tend to overlook them.

The whole hanging kit weights probably 6oz, and 90% of that is the windscreen.

MSR just came out with a new hanging system that might be better, but of course it WILL NOT work with the existing stoves. So you will be out about $100.

I think it's possible to make the MSR kit I have yourself, it's really just a windscreen support with 4 wires. I know I was about to make my own hanger from a whisperlight before I happened upon the MSR hanger for a good deal ($20).

@ Redhawk, definitely, there are risk with using the stove in the tent. The thing is at some point everyone is either forced to not eat/drink or find indoor/protected shelter for the stove. Now back in 1998 we just went without hot food (and of course water) during a big storm, but since then I've not had to do that. I've never actually waterproofed any of my tents, I figure once it is time to waterproof they either go back to the factory (warranty) or in the trash/converted to car camping status.
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