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Old 03-08-2007, 06:54 AM   #1
Dick
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Heart attack victim on Marcy

From the Adiriondack Daily Enterprise:

http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise...articleID=6237
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Old 03-08-2007, 07:18 AM   #2
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Especially scary, since I'm 53. It's tragic. The best that can be said is that if you've got to go, let it be doing something you love.
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Old 03-08-2007, 08:09 AM   #3
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Especially scary, since I'm 53. It's tragic. The best that can be said is that if you've got to go, let it be doing something you love.
I agree and perhaps that fact will provide solace at some point to his surviving family members. Nevertheless, it has to be terribly difficult for them, especially if he left young children behind.
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Old 03-08-2007, 08:36 AM   #4
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Especially scary, since I'm 53. It's tragic. The best that can be said is that if you've got to go, let it be doing something you love.
I agree wholeheartedly.

The only thing I'll add is that this is one of the reasons that I advocate allowing the slowest person in your party to set the pace for the group. I'm not meaning to imply that Mr. Nolan was the slowest person in the party or that this was the cause of his passing but I believe it to be a valid point nonetheless. I'm also a big advocate of taking frequent short breaks and ensuring that all members of a hiking / shoeing party that have been diagnosed with a known cardiac condition carry chewable low-dose aspirin and nitroglycerin if it's prescribed to them.

From the sounds of the sudden collapse it was more likely than not a massive coronary and had little if any precursory warning signs. Although it may not have applied in this unfortunate event everyone should have knowledge of the warning signs of heart attack, especially those that will be spending time in the woods.

My sincerest condolences to his family for their loss, may their grief be short, their memories everlasting and the relief and comfort they find in their religion of choice be plentiful.

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Old 03-08-2007, 08:42 AM   #5
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The best that can be said is that if you've got to go, let it be doing something you love.
I disagree, as much as I love the ADK Mountains. When I die I surely don't want it to be on some trail or mountain but yet surrounded by my loved ones. That would be either in my home or a warm hospital bed not a freezing cold trail or mountaintop.

How do we know this man even loved doing this?
Why do others always believe that the best way to die is doing something you love? That surely doesn't make it easier for the loved ones left behind.

Getting married on a mountaintop is romantic but definitely not death and dying.
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Old 03-08-2007, 08:45 AM   #6
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Sad to hear for sure but if there was a mountain to pass from one world into the next on, it would surely be on Marcy.
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Old 03-08-2007, 08:55 AM   #7
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A related thread.

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Old 03-08-2007, 09:21 AM   #8
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How do we know this man even loved doing this?
Why do others always believe that the best way to die is doing something you love? That surely doesn't make it easier for the loved ones left behind.
If you should perish while being "active", then why not? Maybe you're right, I suppose I would much rather suffer a heart attack while, I don't know, shingleing a roof, plunging a toilet, cleaning a litter box. Those sound so much better. In any case, death is never easy. My sympathies to his family.
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Old 03-08-2007, 09:49 AM   #9
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How do we know this man even loved doing this?
Why do others always believe that the best way to die is doing something you love? That surely doesn't make it easier for the loved ones left behind.
No but they have had the opportunity to spend a lot of time and do a lot of things with you. You only get to die once. Don't you think the how and the where should be the choice of the deceased if at all possible?

And then if that if the case, shouldn't the friends and relatives rejoice in the fact that the person died doing something that they loved to do?

I recently have seen two people who I had a great deal of friendship, if not love, pass away at home, hospiced. They were not happy, and speaking for myself, it was agreat deal more pain seeing them deteriorate over a period of time.

I deeply regret that I didn't make the time to help one of them hike the Appalachian Trail, which was her wish, and pass on out there, surrounded by the wilderness she loved.
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Old 03-08-2007, 10:17 AM   #10
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No but they have had the opportunity to spend a lot of time and do a lot of things with you. You only get to die once. Don't you think the how and the where should be the choice of the deceased if at all possible?

And then if that if the case, shouldn't the friends and relatives rejoice in the fact that the person died doing something that they loved to do?

I recently have seen two people who I had a great deal of friendship, if not love, pass away at home, hospiced. They were not happy, and speaking for myself, it was agreat deal more pain seeing them deteriorate over a period of time.
Like I stated, in an earlier post, "Who to say, he loved to do this?" It could of been his first climb in the High Peaks. I'm sure this gentleman didn't choose or plan to die on Marcy.

Why would friends and relatives rejoice in the fact that he died in the Mountains? I'm sure they would of preferred for him to die surrounded by them.

I'm sorry about the recent passings of your friends. Their deaths it sounds like everyone knew it was coming but with Richard Nolan it was an unexpected death with Cardiac Arrest.
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Old 03-08-2007, 10:31 AM   #11
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Why do others always believe that the best way to die is doing something you love? That surely doesn't make it easier for the loved ones left behind.
Probably because there are so many worse ways to die.......unfortunately, we can't normally choose our own particular method (barring suicide). If he went relatively quickly, which sounds like the case, then I truthfully don't feel that's a bad way to go.

I don't think it's EVER easy for the loved ones being left behind.......
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Old 03-08-2007, 11:26 AM   #12
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Probably because there are so many worse ways to die.......unfortunately, we can't normally choose our own particular method (barring suicide). If he went relatively quickly, which sounds like the case, then I truthfully don't feel that's a bad way to go.

I don't think it's EVER easy for the loved ones being left behind.......
No. it's not. but we know from an early age that it's an inevitability, and if one is of a faith that believes in a heaven, rather then mourn their loss, they should be happy that their loved one is in a better place.

Myself, it isn't death that I fear, it's the lingering before that makes me uncomfortable.
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Old 03-08-2007, 01:58 PM   #13
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Myself, it isn't death that I fear, it's the lingering before that makes me uncomfortable.

I agree 100%. I've had friends die quickly and slowly. Give me fast anytime. I don't know about anyone else, but if I have to die let it be out in the woods where I've always been most comfortable my whole life.


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Old 03-08-2007, 09:38 PM   #14
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My sympathy goes out to this man's family.

Mr Nolan was a very fit climber of both these mountains and others over this earth, including Kilimanjaro. I spoke to someone who is very good friends with the man who was with him when he passed away. I do wish people wouldn't speculate so much when an accident happens in the mountains. This man was as fit and prepared as the best. Everything was done that could be done. His friend started CPR immediately, a doctor was nearby, the forest ranger was just up the trail. Can you imagine how terribly difficult it must be if you were one who tried to save your dying friend and you came on a forum to read second guessings? It's not just here, and I tend to find the speculative rumors much worse on another forum. Having just lent a shoulder and hearing the pain in his voice just pushes me to try and prevent any further speculation. I've never held someone while they died but listening to someone who did brings the discussions on these forums to a whole new perspective.
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Old 03-08-2007, 09:48 PM   #15
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My sympathy goes out to this man's family.

Mr Nolan was a very fit climber of both these mountains and others over this earth, including Kilimanjaro. I spoke to someone who is very good friends with the man who was with him when he passed away. I do wish people wouldn't speculate so much when an accident happens in the mountains. This man was as fit and prepared as the best. Everything was done that could be done. His friend started CPR immediately, a doctor was nearby, the forest ranger was just up the trail. Can you imagine how terribly difficult it must be if you were one who tried to save your dying friend and you came on a forum to read second guessings? It's not just here, and I tend to find the speculative rumors much worse on another forum. Having just lent a shoulder and hearing the pain in his voice just pushes me to try and prevent any further speculation. I've never held someone while they died but listening to someone who did brings the discussions on these forums to a whole new perspective.
As the one who may have started the speculative postings I do sincerely apologize. It was not my intention to question his experience or fitness, only to bring up a few tips that may prevent future situations.

Cordially,

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Old 03-08-2007, 10:14 PM   #16
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I do wish people wouldn't speculate so much when an accident happens in the mountains.
Judy I wasn't speculating. I was just trying to make a point about, whenever someone passes on in the Mountains, others usually say, "At least they died doing what they love." I meant by No Means of being disrespectful. I do feel for the family and send my condolences.

I apologize if any of my postings offended you.
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Old 03-08-2007, 10:26 PM   #17
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As the one who may have started the speculative postings I do sincerely apologize. It was not my intention to question his experience or fitness, only to bring up a few tips that may prevent future situations.

Cordially,

DigitalNY (Ric)
Hi DigitalNY,

Welcome to the forum, by the way! I believe your post was sincere and you have no reason to apologize to anyone for it. Nor does anyone on this thead, with perhaps the possible exception of moi, for putting it up in the first place.

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Old 03-08-2007, 10:53 PM   #18
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No reason for anyone to apologize. As I explained to digital in a PM these threads have invariably ended up in a second guessing match with some forums being more speculative than others. This I didn't mention in the pM but I will mention now. There was another thread where there had been a death and a family member came on and had to defend the deceased. I wanted to prevent that happening again. The unpleasantness of having to deal with public speculation during a time of private grief. We have many new members posting right now and it would appear from the threads running right now that soemtimes it is being forgotten that these forums are read by real people with real feelings. So I was trying to dispense an ounce of prevention. I'll shut up now.
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Old 03-08-2007, 11:50 PM   #19
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My condolences to family and friends.

I think what we can all get from this thread is the fact that no of us are immune to heart disease just becasue we hike. Sedentary lifestyle, fitness and diet are just a few of the risk factors. Some, like heredity, are uncontrollable. Some who have heart attacks have no risk factors. A cardiac arrest can even happen with normal coronary arteries and a defect in the electrical conduction system of the heart.

I work with cardiac patients. Yes, the majority have multiple risk factors like smoking, obesity, uncontrolled diabetes or hypertension, lack of exercise, etc... There are people though that have none of those...healthy, active people who have bad genes...and some don't even have that. Not too long ago I cared for a gentleman who climbed a mountain just fine, two weeks later he developed chest pain while mowing his lawn. Not long after that he was having a quadruple bypass. (he did great post-op). This or what happened to Mr Nolan could happen to any of us.

Do what you can to reduce risk factors. Get your annual physical and talk to your doctor.If you have any risk factors(including family history), ask for doctor for a stress test. Learn CPR for your friends and family.
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Old 03-09-2007, 07:18 AM   #20
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I disagree, as much as I love the ADK Mountains. When I die I surely don't want it to be on some trail or mountain but yet surrounded by my loved ones. That would be either in my home or a warm hospital bed not a freezing cold trail or mountaintop.

How do we know this man even loved doing this?
Why do others always believe that the best way to die is doing something you love? That surely doesn't make it easier for the loved ones left behind.

Getting married on a mountaintop is romantic but definitely not death and dying.
I'm always kind of surprised when a seemingly innocuous sentiment tweaks people. I didn't think I was trying to romanticize death and dying, just trying to find something that might offer some solace. I did say "The best that can be said is that if you've got to go, let it be doing something you love."
I'm not sure that pointing out that he may have preferred to die another way, or in another place, would have been preferable. Sorry.
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