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Old 05-08-2005, 06:57 PM   #1
Gray Ghost
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Carnivorous Plants in the ADKs!

Yes, there are carnivorous plants in the Adirondacks. While flipping through an ADK wildflower field guide, I discovered that the Northern Pitcher Plant makes its home here. I was out on a camping trip over the weekend and discovered some. As soon as I figure out how to resize my digital photos, I took a couple of pics that I'm pretty proud of, I'll post them on this thread. I don't want to give away the location because it is pretty remote, but I will say that they grow only in sphagnum moss bogs. If anyone has any idea how I can resize the pics (I have iphoto on my mac) please let me know.
-GG
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Old 05-08-2005, 08:09 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gray Ghost
Yes, there are carnivorous plants in the Adirondacks. While flipping through an ADK wildflower field guide, I discovered that the Northern Pitcher Plant makes its home here. I was out on a camping trip over the weekend and discovered some. As soon as I figure out how to resize my digital photos, I took a couple of pics that I'm pretty proud of, I'll post them on this thread. I don't want to give away the location because it is pretty remote, but I will say that they grow only in sphagnum moss bogs. If anyone has any idea how I can resize the pics (I have iphoto on my mac) please let me know.
-GG
GG, we had never heard of pitcher plants being in the Adirondacks until today, when we read through a lean-to register at Millman Pond (east of Lake George). Someone posted having seen these plants (we didn't see any, though). Coincidentally, your post is the second reference we've seen - two references in one day! I checked and found that they are indeed in the Adirondacks. Looking forward to your pics!

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Old 05-08-2005, 08:31 PM   #3
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Check out the photography thread with Gary Dean, he is very knowledgeable and someonr I believe brought up Macs in that thread. Pitcher plants are cool, I have seen them.
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Old 05-08-2005, 08:43 PM   #4
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Sundew can also be found in the bogs of the Adirondacks. Look for it on logs submerged at the shores of acidic ponds. A real meat-eater
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Old 05-08-2005, 09:34 PM   #5
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I took pictures pitcher plants a couple of years ago up at Buckhorn lake in Piseco and yes they are in a spaghum moss bog on the West Side of the lake.

Beautiful plant!
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Old 05-08-2005, 10:08 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gray Ghost
Yes, there are carnivorous plants in the Adirondacks. While flipping through an ADK wildflower field guide, I discovered that the Northern Pitcher Plant makes its home here. I was out on a camping trip over the weekend and discovered some. As soon as I figure out how to resize my digital photos, I took a couple of pics that I'm pretty proud of, I'll post them on this thread. I don't want to give away the location because it is pretty remote, but I will say that they grow only in sphagnum moss bogs. If anyone has any idea how I can resize the pics (I have iphoto on my mac) please let me know.
-GG
Here's a pict I took at Silver Lake Bog. There is a board walk over the bog, so the public can enjoy the bog with out causing damage to the fragile habitat.

-Kev
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Old 05-08-2005, 10:21 PM   #7
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Speaking of plants, keep an eye on the ground for the spring ephemerals. The flowering plants I have seen so far have been .. Dutchman's Breeches, Red, White, and Painted Trillium, Bluets, Hepatica, Spring Beauty, Wild Strawberry, Bellwort, Bloodroot, and Pink Lady Slipper. It's been a relatively cold spring, so the flowers are having a slow start.

-Kev
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Old 05-09-2005, 01:51 PM   #8
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Pics

Alright, I'm attempting to post the photos. If nothing appears, I guess i messed up!
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Old 05-09-2005, 01:56 PM   #9
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Cool, it worked. Here's another, slightly better shot. I'm pretty proud of this shot, though it is harder to appreciate when scaled back.
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Old 05-23-2005, 07:05 AM   #10
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in the new adirondack life issue there is an article on teh pitcher plants, good read, its either in the june or teh 2005 guide to teh outdoors edition. oh and does anyone knwo what type of flower i saw , it looks liek apainted trilium but its white with a pinkish hue on the very inside of the petals. i dont have a great wildflower book, ihtink its older than my grandparents. hmm maybe i should upgrade haha - wiley
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Old 05-23-2005, 08:27 AM   #11
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in the new adirondack life issue there is an article on teh pitcher plants, good read, its either in the june or teh 2005 guide to teh outdoors edition. oh and does anyone knwo what type of flower i saw , it looks liek apainted trilium but its white with a pinkish hue on the very inside of the petals. i dont have a great wildflower book, ihtink its older than my grandparents. hmm maybe i should upgrade haha - wiley
Sounds like a painted trillium to me. 3 whole, whorled leaves and 3 flower parts. White petals with pink on the inside.

-Kev
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Old 05-23-2005, 11:34 AM   #12
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Pitcher Plant at Buckhorn Lake

Whats not to like??

Beautiful and it eats black flies and other bugs:
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Old 05-23-2005, 11:41 AM   #13
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Another view of a Northern Pitcher Plant

A better view for identification
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Old 05-30-2005, 09:45 PM   #14
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Sundew's in the Adirondacks?!?

Do they look like this? I also threw in another pitcher plant flower. Strangely beautiful. You gotta love it. I've seen the pitcher plants on several adirondack lakes. I've only seen the sundews on one lake. I hope these pics uploaded alright and I hope you enjoy them. Swiz
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Old 05-30-2005, 10:08 PM   #15
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yes, your first three shots are of sundew
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Old 05-30-2005, 10:34 PM   #16
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Glad to see they came out. Thanx for the reply. Jason
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