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Old 10-22-2009, 08:27 PM   #1
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which birds DON'T fly south?

I was thinkin that the Boreal chickadee,the sparrow and cardninal.Any thoughts?
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Old 10-23-2009, 05:39 AM   #2
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Chickens
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Old 10-23-2009, 06:55 AM   #3
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Kiwi's?
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Old 10-23-2009, 08:56 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by looncry View Post
I was thinkin that the Boreal chickadee,the sparrow and cardninal.Any thoughts?
Looncry
Gray jays, crows, ravens, grouse, turkeys, woodpeckers, the owls...

I saw robins near me throughout last winter.

White throated sparrows do migrate. I was lucky to have one stop by my place on his way south yesterday. I didn't see him it but their song is unmistakable.
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Old 10-23-2009, 11:22 AM   #5
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Gray jays, crows, ravens, grouse, turkeys, woodpeckers, the owls...
Non-Migratory: Eastern Screech Owls, Great-Horned Owls, Barred Owls

Migratory: Saw-Whets, Short-Eared Owls, Long-Eared Owls, Snowy Whites
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:02 PM   #6
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Non-Migratory: Eastern Screech Owls, Great-Horned Owls, Barred Owls

Migratory: Saw-Whets, Short-Eared Owls, Long-Eared Owls, Snowy Whites
Snowy Whites migrate North? South? Looking at their plummage,I would guess North. Is this correct? tx Looncry
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Old 10-23-2009, 05:21 PM   #7
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Snowy Whites migrate North? South? Looking at their plummage,I would guess North. Is this correct? tx Looncry
Snowy owls are originaly from the arctic regions...their main food supply is lemmings. Due to the dwindling numbers of those rodents in the arctic they visit northern & sometimes central New York in search of easier acquired chow. Otherwise they don't migrate much...they go where they find dinner.

One time I was bow hunting from a ground blind in Rennselaerville State Forest. I had got myself all situated right before sunrise...I started to drift off a little bit, then saw a shadow out of the corner of my eye. This huge Snowy was looking to check out the same area where my blind was and cruised into the same space I was in....long story short we gave each other a "heart attack"

I was thinking....doesn't this thread belong in the wildlife section? Just making sure we're all analy organized & all that happy horse-poop...

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Old 10-23-2009, 07:32 PM   #8
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Snowy White Owls nest in the arctic region. In the winter they migrate south. Most stay in Canada. Young Males are usually the ones you see in the United States.

They prey primarily on Lemmings in the arctic region. Lemmings go thru cycles of population explosions and collapses. This cycle usually happens every couple of years (averaging around 4-5 years). When there is a Lemming population crash, you see record numbers of Snowy Whites in the United States.

Around November you can usually see one around Coxsackie. They then migrate down towards NYC.
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Old 10-24-2009, 05:23 PM   #9
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Snowy White Owls nest in the arctic region. In the winter they migrate south. Most stay in Canada. Young Males are usually the ones you see in the United States.

They prey primarily on Lemmings in the arctic region. Lemmings go thru cycles of population explosions and collapses. This cycle usually happens every couple of years (averaging around 4-5 years). When there is a Lemming population crash, you see record numbers of Snowy Whites in the United States.

Around November you can usually see one around Coxsackie. They then migrate down towards NYC.
whoo knew that?! Mikie! ty Looncry
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Old 10-24-2009, 07:21 PM   #10
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Pheasants. And it seems as though thousands of Canada Geese no longer migrate south, and just stay on local waterways all year.
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Old 10-24-2009, 07:24 PM   #11
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Snowy Whites migrate North? South? Looking at their plummage,I would guess North. Is this correct? tx Looncry
If you think about it, all birds that migrate south also migrate north (and visa-versa). It all depends on your perspective and where you live.
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Old 10-24-2009, 07:29 PM   #12
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If you think about it, all birds that migrate south also migrate north (and visa-versa). It all depends on your perspective and where you live.
When you think of it,tis so. But,what in the world does your Avatar mean on the other Forum. I am waiting in anticipation! Looncry
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Old 10-24-2009, 10:50 PM   #13
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When you think of it,tis so. But,what in the world does your Avatar mean on the other Forum. I am waiting in anticipation! Looncry
This one that says "TRIP"? it's just some unusual graffiti under a bridge here in town - I'll change it again soon.
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Old 10-25-2009, 08:51 PM   #14
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If you think about it, all birds that migrate south also migrate north (and visa-versa). It all depends on your perspective and where you live.
And to elaborate on Bob's input:

Neotropicals are here as visitors in the summer to find high energy food for nesting. In effect, we are borrowing them.

Many birds that eat insects (high protein content) during nesting and raising young, go back to their home territory below the equator and dine on a diet of fruit. No longer producing eggs and feeding young, they no longer are in need of a calorie intense diet and go back to the diet of their home territory.

A very good book on this is Living On the Wind: Across the Hemisphere With Migratory Birds by Scott Weidensaul. It's not an easy read, but well worth your time.
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Old 10-26-2009, 10:06 AM   #15
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And to elaborate on Bob's input:

Neotropicals are here as visitors in the summer to find high energy food for nesting. In effect, we are borrowing them.

Many birds that eat insects (high protein content) during nesting and raising young, go back to their home territory below the equator and dine on a diet of fruit. No longer producing eggs and feeding young, they no longer are in need of a calorie intense diet and go back to the diet of their home territory.

A very good book on this is Living On the Wind: Across the Hemisphere With Migratory Birds by Scott Weidensaul. It's not an easy read, but well worth your time.
I never knew that. After reading my ''Evereast'' book,and the books DS and Dick recommended in a post,I will get right on this one,B.chick. tnx Looncry
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