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Old 06-19-2013, 09:27 AM   #1
BleeckerMtn
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New SOF Guideboat

Hi Folks,

New to the forum and happy to be here. Love that I can read and share and learn from/with people with the same obsessions I have!

So, after 14 months I finally got my Guideboat wet for the first time two weeks ago. It was everything I had hoped it would be - fast, light, and stable. I modeled it after Grant's Virginia but with a few changes. First, I elected to do a Skin on Frame version instead of stripping the hull. It was easier, cheaper, and resulted in a lighter boat than the original (even though it is slightly less impressive). Secondly, because of the lighter weight, I widened the boat by 4" to maintain the stability. Take a look at the whole build here:

http://www.smugmug.com/gallery/27451...8904&k=ZtSRzr5

It was so exciting to be getting it wet for the first time after 14 months of dreaming about it. From the first pull of the soft maple oars, I knew that I got it right. This thing was blisteringly fast. I'll concede that most of my experience rowing (20 years of it) has been in those heavy aluminum Jon boats with the battle-axe oars, but still. The oars flexed and snapped and I was off. The lake was like glass in the late afternoon and I had cruised over a mile before I knew it. I dug the left oar in hard backwards and I spun around on a dime. Back to the dock and it was time for dinner. In those few minutes of rowing, I knew that all the time I put in (and one angry fiancee) was all worth it.

Over this summer, I'll get getting out with it as much as I can. I'm actually hoping to get it entered in the 90 miler with my brother. I've requested application forms and I know they are sent out in mid June, but we have not received them yet. Anyone out there gotten them?

Again, happy to be here on the Forum, and I hope to see you out on the water sometime.
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:32 AM   #2
daveo4
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Superb job!! I haven't seen Brian's guideboat but I know him and he put a lot of thought into creating the SOF guideboats. I build SOF kayaks and canoes so I know the joys and the pain of what you went through in the process. Great work. Enjoy rowing your new craft.
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Old 06-19-2013, 01:59 PM   #3
shiraz627
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Very nice boat!
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Old 06-19-2013, 08:41 PM   #4
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Mr. Mtn,

Wow!!! Nice work, dude.
I studied your photos and captions closely, I have been toying with the idea of SOF guideboat for a few years.
A few questions for you:

How did you fasten the stringers to the ribs?
Did you shrink your skin in any way? Or just sew it as tightly as possible?

I think I want to build a bit smaller guideboat, maybe 12 or 13 ft max...I built a 16 ft Grant pattern "Ghost" long back and it was too heavy and bulky for my style of travel.
But a SOF guideboat with carbon fiber/foam ribs, stringers, stems and bottom board would be very light...
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Old 06-19-2013, 10:11 PM   #5
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BleekerMtn- WOW! Thanks for sharing! That is awesome. It must be a great feeling when you finish such a (what I would consider) large undertaking.
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Old 06-20-2013, 08:52 AM   #6
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stripperguy, I was hoping that you would come across this thread. I had read previously that you were interested in building one.

The instruction book that I had, as well as others who had gone before me suggested that I use small ring shank nails to attach the stringers. I didn't listen. I used 1" #6 stainless steel screws (over 500 of them) for all of the connections on the boat (ribs to bottom board, stringers to ribs, deck framing). I was happy with my decision because where they complained about some flexing, I had none.

The skin is 10.5oz Ballistic Nylon. You can get it here: http://www.skinboats.org/. It was suggested that I use 6oz but I was not too concerned about weight and didn't have to be gentile to the boat. I set out with the idea that this was a workboat - built for fishing and nothing else (except maybe a race or two just for fun). I began to sew up the skin with heavy duty nylon thread but the first time I went to stretch it over the frame, the stitching blew out. I then went to 8lb mono-filament fishing line and that worked great. I've been told that 6oz skin will stretch much easier. After sewing up the other side, I whetted the whole skin and used a heat gun to shrink it down. This took a lot longer than I expected but I'm glad that I took the time to get it right.

This boat is HUGE. It is great as a fishing platform - high weight capacity, loads of space for gear, very stable for landing Walter - but it is verging on the edge of inconvenient. The first time it left the garage, I took it out to the car to strap it on and the whole hull fit over the roof of my car. I had to clamp a pair of 2x2 boards to my exiting roof rack to extend it out by half a foot on each side. It is fine for cartopping to still water but I foresee some headaches when I take it up to St. Regis and head for Fish Pond. If I was to build another one (you can be sure of that), I'll make a 12-13 footer to use as a back country boat.

I would be extremely interested in your Carbon-foam components for a boat. The rigidity alone would be leaps and bounds ahead of wood, not to mention the water resistance. There is no varnish on my boat at all, it's only oiled. After a week of poring rain, I could tell that it was starting to relax and I had to put tension across the gunwales and stems to make sure it dried in the right shape. Carbon-foam components would be then next logical step in boat performance. You'll have to keep me posted on your progress as I would be very interested in building one myself.
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Old 06-22-2013, 08:18 AM   #7
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Bleecker,

I see that all of your stringers are on the outside of your ribs. I have been pondering if I should have the ribs and stringers notched at every intersection. That way, the skin would have more consistent support. That would require quite a lot of work and some very precise layouts.

But, after looking at your results, your skin looks great!! (the guideboat skin, that is, maybe your skin looks great too, but I'm too manly to admit if I noticed )

Did you fasten the skin at the gunnels? Wait, I guess you did, you stapled to the sheer clamp. I was thinking to epoxy it in place...
Are you having any problem with the skin loosening or stretching?
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Old 06-22-2013, 11:12 AM   #8
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For those interested in skin-on-frame construction, "Building Skin-On-Frame Boats" by Robert Morris is an excellent read and it has designs for a few kayaks, canoes, and a pram as well.
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Old 06-22-2013, 09:32 PM   #9
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Stripperguy,

While it is true that putting the stringers on the outside of the ribs changed the dimensions of the boat, I feel that it is minimal. If anything it makes the whole thing even stabler by beaming it out in the middle.

I can't help but think that notching the stringers to fit the ribs would end poorly. Firstly, the stringers do add strength to the craft and nothing them would reduce that. Secondly, if you notched it so that the stringers were flush with the outside of the rib, it may result in an unfair hull. If you look at a cross section of my hull, it would be composed of 6 straight lines on each side and one on the bottom making the semi circle. If the stringers and ribs were flush, at each of the rib locations, the ribs would actually be in contact with the skin. This may add a bit of strength to the skin, but it would also cause the hull to be comprised of a grid of little boxes (instead of the 6 horizontal strips on mine).

At the shear line, the skin was stapled to the top stringers (3 3/4 pieces of cedar laminated to make the curve). The gunwale was then screwed over the skin into the stringers. It is not connected directly to the skin (aside from the screw hols and some friction) but it does cover up those ugly staples nicely.

Keep those questions coming, I love talking about my boat
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Old 06-22-2013, 09:49 PM   #10
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About the skin stretching/loosening - If I could swear on this forum, I would. The first week I had it out, it rained 5 of the 6 days we were camping. Now, most people with a brand new boat would want to take it easy and baby it a bit but not me. I was out on it every day, several times. The frame of my boat is oiled, not varnished, so it is not immune to the water (maybe a mistake on my part).

By the end of the week, I noticed that the wood was relaxing. On my first trip out the oars just touched in the center rowing station. By the end of the week, the oars were about an inch apart. I also noticed some rippling in the skin. When I got back, I put some bracing on the boat so that it should dry in the correct position. We'll see how it turns out.
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Old 06-22-2013, 10:41 PM   #11
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I'd like to know the secret to oiling wood myself. Have had mediocre success with thinned linseed on paddles--obviously not that good for multi-day trips. I was really disappointed with tung oil on the wooden gunnels and decks on my canoe. I could see the wood soaking more water each day (wasn't even really that rainy) and this was after about 6 coats over a three day period.

Wish you luck with the beautiful guide boat.
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Old 06-23-2013, 12:17 PM   #12
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Oiling wood

I've been using a tung oil/varnish mix on all the wood bits of my canoes for years with very good results. Two parts tung oil to one part spar varnish (gloss) is fairly easy to apply, gives a bit of build, and the spar varnish protects the wood from UV. A lot of what's sold as tung oil isn't really - it's thinned and mixed with heavy metal drying agents. I've been using this stuff for a while now and it seems to work well - http://www.realmilkpaint.com/oil.html



Quote:
Originally Posted by aft paddle View Post
I'd like to know the secret to oiling wood myself. Have had mediocre success with thinned linseed on paddles--obviously not that good for multi-day trips. I was really disappointed with tung oil on the wooden gunnels and decks on my canoe. I could see the wood soaking more water each day (wasn't even really that rainy) and this was after about 6 coats over a three day period.

Wish you luck with the beautiful guide boat.
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Old 06-23-2013, 01:17 PM   #13
Rich Lockwood
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Has anybody ever tried Sinkconight? Im sure I spelled it wrong. I have helped to recover and airplane with it. You put it on and secure it and use a clothes iron to shrink it. It gets tight as a drum.
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Old 07-19-2016, 05:05 PM   #14
daleca
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My new SOF guide boat

I have been building a SOF Adirondack guide boat as well. I have 140 hrs. that I have spent building it. Attached are some pictures of it on Mirror lake in the Uinta mountains of Utah.
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File Type: jpg AGB mirror lake.jpg (157 Bytes, 92 views)
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Old 07-20-2016, 08:05 PM   #15
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Wow O Wowee. Really nice job. Beautiful lines, I'm glad you're pleased with it.

Thanks for the photos and sharing them with us.

Best of luck with her!
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Old 07-21-2016, 02:25 PM   #16
snapper
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BleeckerMtn - Can you tell me about your oars? Did you have plans or did you work from photos or prints? Also, you mentioned the oars are maple but I was wondering on the starting dimensions for the wood you used? Any info you can share will be greatly appreciated.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

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