Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > Paddling in the Adirondacks
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-04-2016, 10:57 PM   #1
MaximusFunk24
Member
 
MaximusFunk24's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Plattsburgh
Posts: 113
Marine grade Plywood

wondering if anyone knows someplace within a few hours drive of plattsburgh that sells Okoume plywood for boat building?
MaximusFunk24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2016, 12:22 AM   #2
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 692
http://www.pittsfordlumber.com/Pitts...hester-NY.html Requires full encapsulation such as epoxy. Do you plan to build or repair? I find that MDF is good for repairing decking. Sealing it with spar varnish or polyurethane is adequate.
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.

Last edited by Schultzz; 07-05-2016 at 08:14 AM..
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2016, 10:35 AM   #3
MaximusFunk24
Member
 
MaximusFunk24's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Plattsburgh
Posts: 113
Thanks, a bit further than I had hoped, but still cheaper than paying shipping online.

Im planning on building a Sassafras 14 stitch and glue lapstrake. Unfortunately I have a very tight budget, but after doing some research I'm under the impression that the plywood used isnt something that can be cheaped out on. Also, I like that the Okoume is extremely light, as this will be my budget alternative to a kevlar or cedar strip pack canoe.

My plan was to use fiberglass on the outer seams, stems, and very bottom of the hull only for cost and weight. I have a gallon of leftover 2 part Eastwood Epoxy primer from automotive purposes. It has the consistency of paint, and I plan to use it to wet out the glass and coat the rest of the hull. I would love for someone to tell me that this is fine and will work just as good as buying clear 2 part epoxy :P I plan on painting it afterwards, because epoxy primer will break down with UV exposure.

On the inside I was just going to use a lot of spar varnish and no epoxy (except to hold the bulkheads in place)
MaximusFunk24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2016, 01:31 PM   #4
Zach
Last seen wandering vaguely
 
Zach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Orwell NY
Posts: 755
I can't advise about your project as I have never built a plywood boat of any kind. I've built two aspen-strip pack canoes and the cost of materials for each has been in the $300-400 range, so strip built might not be so bad given the high cost of marine plywood.
Zach
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2016, 08:37 PM   #5
Buckladd
Member
 
Buckladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hogtown
Posts: 927
I built a 6-hour canoe (actually, about 18 hours in the end) at a workshop at the Adirondack Museum over ten years ago. It's a great boat and we used two eight-foot sheets of marine plywood. I seem to recall the instructor saying you could order it. I'm sure you've considered that but check a local dealer and maybe they could order it for you. Good luck.
Buckladd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2016, 09:48 PM   #6
stripperguy
Hangin' by a thread
 
stripperguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Schenectady, NY
Posts: 3,544
I used Oukome for the bulkheads, decks, cockpit and transom of a high performance sailboat that I built.

I do believe the word Okuome is French for "costs three times as much"!
It's been 15 years since I built that boat, and some of the inside was left as bare wood. The Okoume was warranted by Lloyds of London to be rot proof for 25 or 50 years of full or partial submersion in fresh or salt water. Pretty bold warranty, I guess it's really rot resistant.
The last I looked (fall of 2015) the inside of my hull and the bare Okoume looked just as it did the day I finished the boat!!

As for your plan to use that Eastman epoxy primer for a wet out, I say try a small test panel before you commit to do the entire hull. The primer is specifically formulated to serve a very different purpose than a structural epoxy resin. Better to find out how it works on a 12" x 12" panel...

And like Zach, I'll mention that a small strip built boat could be done on the cheap, but still be a quality hull. You already know that any potential hull built with sheet goods will be limited to simple curves and likely a hard chine.
__________________
Stripperguy's Photos (sort of)
stripperguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2016, 09:29 AM   #7
RichieC
Member
 
RichieC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 339
Well as far as encapsulating... and marine, and wetting out fiberglass- i know you are on a budget... but if you experiment and it fails, you've not done well budget-wise as anything you spend would end up in the landfill.

West System is kinda fail safe, sinks in and becomes one with the wood, but expensive- I have found the best price from these guys:

http://www.discountmarinesupplies.co...+to+Search.y=0

Shipping arrives in just a few days.

Whatever you get in two-part will have a decent cost, see if this figures to be that much more. Stuff is fantastic. There are others I suppose. This company's "kits" come with the measuring pumps- ( usually an added $18 cost- where I have seen it for sale in the shelf) makes mixing up small to large batches a no brainer. You can roll or brush it on, let it flow on its own, sand and the next layers won't take so much- but even if you stopped at one, and then spar Epiphaned varnished it or marine paint. I'd think you be farther along then anything not specially designed to be in the water.

However, I'll give you that any small boat isn't moored or anything- maybe it will be OK for the short time its in the water.

For what it's worth.
RichieC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2016, 02:07 PM   #8
MaximusFunk24
Member
 
MaximusFunk24's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Plattsburgh
Posts: 113
I was leaning towards a strip built at first, but when factoring in the cost of building a strongback, making forms, having to buy a ton of clear epoxy, way more fiberglass, and making some sort of contraption to steam the stems in, I picked the stitch and glue boat. The appearance has actually grown on me a lot, it looks kind of Scandinavian.

I've already got a big hunk of ash for the gunwales and thwart, sawhorses, along with some spar varnish and exterior paint. So if the Eastwood works, my only real cost will be the fiberglass tape and the plywood. I will probably make a trip to the place mentioned in Rochester in a few weeks unless someone knows of a closer supplier, or maybe a boat building place that might sell it.
MaximusFunk24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2016, 03:13 PM   #9
chairrock
Indian Mt.Club
 
chairrock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 2,631
Atlantic Plywood. near Albany http://atlanticplywood.com/
__________________
Be careful, don't spread invasive species!!

When a dog runs at you,whistle for him.
Henry David Thoreau

CL50-#23
chairrock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 08:19 AM   #10
Banoe
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 49
I have built a few plywood canoes/boats out of different plywood. Okoume is the only way to go. Any other plywood will give you problems.

You can get cheaper epoxy than West System Epoxy. I have used Raka products before with good results. One boat is 15+ years old and the epoxy taped seams are still strong.

I found strip canoes easier and more satisfying to build than plywood canoes the cost was about the same but, I dont know if strip construction would work well with your epoxy paint/glass application.
Banoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 12:24 PM   #11
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 692
"West System is kinda fail safe, sinks in and becomes one with the wood," - Richie C.

I too have had good results with the West System epoxy, but be sure you follow up with a good spar varnish or it will turn chalky white. Yes it is expensive but it is proven.
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 12:51 PM   #12
JohnnyVirgil
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Porter Corners, NY
Posts: 669
You might also try Curtis Lumber, in Ballston Lake NY. They ordered my marine plywood for me when I built my sailboat.
JohnnyVirgil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 01:41 PM   #13
Zach
Last seen wandering vaguely
 
Zach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Orwell NY
Posts: 755
RAKA is great stuff too, I used it on two strip canoes based on Stripperguy's recommendation and I was very pleased with how well it worked. It's also a bit cheaper than West System, I think.
Zach
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2016, 02:05 PM   #14
yellowcanoe
Member
 
yellowcanoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maine
Posts: 2,177
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyVirgil View Post
You might also try Curtis Lumber, in Ballston Lake NY. They ordered my marine plywood for me when I built my sailboat.
Its a chain. There is a Curtis Lumber in Plattsburgh. Did you try them?
yellowcanoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.