Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > Outdoors Related Discussion > Photography
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-05-2008, 03:28 PM   #1
pico23
Member
 
pico23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Between the Cats and Daks
Posts: 727
Kilburn Slide In An Abbreviated Weekend

I can't complain usually it's Caney or I that gets injured and ends a trip, or a few months of hiking, but Aim had a fight with a tree and we only got to enjoy one simply beautiful day. If I stayed at home every weekend that called for rain I'd never hike or paddle. Worst case is you are bone soaked and appreciate the sunny days a bit more.

The details can be found in my blog. As can the rest of the shots. It's been about 6 years since I climbed Kilburn, and we actually turned around after the 3rd headwall in the rain back in 2002. No views and pouring rain made it fairly monotonous This time we climbed to the top of the final headwall which I'd rate at about 5.1-5.3 via the line we took. Definitely harder than the first 3 pitches of Chapel Pond Slab for a reference.

We'll definitely be seeking out more slides this year in preparation for the Wind River Range in August. Anything with moderate approaches and technical headwalls are on the list. Those Whiteface slides with the 5th class headwalls look especially inviting.

Anyway:











__________________


"As to every healthy boy with a taste for outdoor life, the northern forest -the Adirondacks- were to me a veritable land of enchantment." -Theodore Roosevelt

Mountain Visions: The Wilderness Through My Eyes
pico23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2008, 05:31 PM   #2
marzrw
Member
 
marzrw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,565
Great shots. Sorry to hear about your wife. Some really awesome shots of late!!!!
__________________
"The way I see it, you're hooked.Trout have you. Another soul lost." Elias Wonder, The Earth is Enough by Harry Middleton
marzrw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2008, 10:38 PM   #3
pico23
Member
 
pico23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Between the Cats and Daks
Posts: 727
Thanks...I was oddly happy winter was over this year, when usually it's my favorite season. That whole summer like January really sapped my enthusiasm, and then Caney getting sick. Change of seasons was a nice way to wipe the slate clean, and this time of the year is easy to be motivated. Long days and late starts, light hikers vs snowshoes and plastic boots, no snow/ice to slow you down, no bugs, cool temps. Easy hiking.

it's great to be back out and other than a few family weekends and some paid photo stuff (2 little league tournaments, beer fest in montreal, my sisters graduation in DC), we are booked from mid april till October with outdoor stuff including 2 weeks in the Winds. Wooo Hoooo!!!!

Aim's fine though, her eye looks better today and feels better. We'll be in NH this weekend I think. Adams and Madison probably. One last weekend with the crampons maybe, but sometimes they never come off the pack.
__________________


"As to every healthy boy with a taste for outdoor life, the northern forest -the Adirondacks- were to me a veritable land of enchantment." -Theodore Roosevelt

Mountain Visions: The Wilderness Through My Eyes
pico23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2008, 05:01 AM   #4
marzrw
Member
 
marzrw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,565
Have you been to the WindRiver Area before? I saw a backpack/flyfishing trip on the old 'Fishin' Hole' show a few years ago and almost booked a day trip last year in that area but never did. It looks like an awesome area. You should have an awesome time.

I know you're down on the National Parks about the fees, etc. I do agree, but I do have to say the Tetons which are very close I believe to the Winds is spectacular. Lots of climbing there if you felt inclined. And Glacier NP, well you have to see it someday.

This is the Cascade Canyon Trail in Teton NP about 7-8 miles in. There are primitive campsites (backpacking) available here. We were just there for the day to drink in the beauty. About a 13 mile RT hike. We saw moose, bears, mule deer, and marmots too. You are literally walking with mountains on both sides of you the whole hike. It's kind of like going to NYC for the first time and walking up and down the streets with your head staring up, except it's mountains not skyscrapers.

I took this shot lying on my side, camera a few inches from the ground almost lying in the puddle to capture the Glacier Lillies and the reflection in the puddle. My wife thinks I'm crazy too!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Cascade Canyon.JPG (76.9 KB, 103 views)
File Type: jpg Canyon.JPG (100.5 KB, 103 views)
__________________
"The way I see it, you're hooked.Trout have you. Another soul lost." Elias Wonder, The Earth is Enough by Harry Middleton

Last edited by marzrw; 05-08-2008 at 05:19 AM..
marzrw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2008, 01:43 AM   #5
pico23
Member
 
pico23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Between the Cats and Daks
Posts: 727
Great shots Bob.

Never been to the winds before, but besides the Bugaboos I am pretty confident (based on pictures) these are the most beautiful mountains in North America.

The Tetons are beautiful but it's not just fees or rules that ruin the NPs, it's the whole atmosphere. NPs seem to attract a strange crowd just because of the NP status. I figure there is enough national forest and wilderness to keep me happy for a lifetime of trips. But I admit, there will be exceptions to the NP boycott. Technically Caney and I were in RMNP while in the Indian Peaks since we climbed two peaks that straddled the boundary.

I don't think we'll have a lot of time to hit the Tetons this year. We only have 18 days...and factoring 6 (being generous to ourselves since we could do it in less than 30 hours) for driving it's only 12 days. I'm always a fan of seeing more of less, and not spreading too thin. I'd rather come out of the Winds feeling like I really knew the area we spent time in then that I just hiked through it with my head down.

And of course I'd like to come home with a few shots I can be proud of. All your photos from the Tetons have always been great. Seems like you really love going out there. I've been there, laying on the ground and having whom ever I am with look at me like I am mad...my wife especially loved me laying on the street to get this one below, a good shot is worth a little effort though...

__________________


"As to every healthy boy with a taste for outdoor life, the northern forest -the Adirondacks- were to me a veritable land of enchantment." -Theodore Roosevelt

Mountain Visions: The Wilderness Through My Eyes
pico23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2008, 05:46 PM   #6
marzrw
Member
 
marzrw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,565
Yeah, that was the shot I remembered you saying you shot it lying down. And you're right about not travelling too far and spreading too thin in a trip vs. getting the whole experience from one destination. Last year was our first year out west except for Portland a year before for our son's art show. We thought we would never return again. So we spent a fair amount of time in the Tetons, a fair amount of time in Yellowstone, and a fair amount of time in Glacier. All of the "experts" (friends and family) said you have to go here, there, everywhere, and I said the same thing as you, I would rather see as much as I can from a couple of spots.
__________________
"The way I see it, you're hooked.Trout have you. Another soul lost." Elias Wonder, The Earth is Enough by Harry Middleton
marzrw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2008, 11:10 AM   #7
Kevin
**BANNED**
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: West Sand Lake, NY
Posts: 5,857
Looks like fun. Val was thinking we could try this Monday on our way home since we'll be in the High Peaks for the holiday weekend...

Would the headwall be too difficult for novice rock climbers with no experience leading? I'm assuming there's more than one route up the rock... ? [btw, we're bringing our climbing shoes]
Kevin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 01:53 PM   #8
pico23
Member
 
pico23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Between the Cats and Daks
Posts: 727
The headwall with rock shoes should be easy. as far as other routes, the edges are muddy and dangerous (IMO), better to climb clean rock up the center than hike tree to tree on mud and slick rock.

Psychologically the edges are safer, realistically they are not.

Rock shoes really aren't necessary for ascent, but down climbing they would be useful. Make sure whatever footwear you are wearing is mud/dirt free. There were (probably are) lots of muddy and wet spots scattered.

The alternative, and my preference is to rap off a tree for descent. You'd need a full a rope (50-60m) probably. Although it would be possible to rap the edges with a 30mm rope. Even as novice climbers you should be proficient at throwing a rope around a tree and feeding the belay device for a rappel or using a biner brake (better for this since a belay device is pointless to carry).

BTW, my wife has no problem climbing 5.8+ routes or better but if a rope isn't attached to her she struggles on 5.0. So keep the psych factor in mind. On the other hand I do better on moderate rock without the rope. The idea I can fall is a bad thing since easy 5 rock usually has more ledges and things to hit on the way down. No fall climbing is always the best philosophy.
__________________


"As to every healthy boy with a taste for outdoor life, the northern forest -the Adirondacks- were to me a veritable land of enchantment." -Theodore Roosevelt

Mountain Visions: The Wilderness Through My Eyes
pico23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 03:07 PM   #9
Kevin
**BANNED**
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: West Sand Lake, NY
Posts: 5,857
Thanks pico, that's exactly what I was wondering. We'll bring what we have of rope (but I think she only has 30m ). Also, the weather the further north you go on Monday isn't looking that great so we may end up just driving home.
Kevin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 04:26 PM   #10
Neil
Admin
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 6,080
I got half-way up the headwall in hiking boots with soles that were worn smooth. There is a thick flake of rock that runs slightly right to left near the center and you can grab hold of it. It sort of shows in the picture. Still, I kept sliding back so I bailed to climber's left. If I had had sticky approach shoes it would have been quite do-able and I am no rock climber.

Going up and down was easy using the trees. Walking down backwards wrapping a rope around a forward extended arm would be more than enough.

The headwall at the bottom is pretty nifty, too. There's an obvious crack or dike on the far left (that was gushing water a few weeks ago according to a friend), it should be dry now.
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 08:21 PM   #11
AdkGal
Member
 
AdkGal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sugarbush, NY (ADK Park)
Posts: 76
Does anyone know how Kilburn Slide got it's name?

Jackie
AdkGal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.