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Old 09-10-2005, 01:56 PM   #1
Becca
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Question Advice on Overnighting

I've camped all my life, at state campgrounds, DEC, in the Adirondacks. Now after hiking up Blue Mt, I've gotten the bug. My son has decided to become my partner for doing the 46 peaks, mostly likely the 100. My hubby will aslo join us on the daytrips. He's very afraid of the Bears, and won't do an overnighter. My son and I have no problems with them. Seeing as my son is 6'4" he can be quite intemidating to a bear with his size himself. . The only thing that has me a little leary, is not being able to have a campfire. What do you all use for light at night while in the Eastern High peaks where fire is prohibited? We've been doing a lot of reading and research to prepare ourselfs. Learning to work a GPS, map reading, and other survival musts for the trail. Any tips and advice for overnight out on the trail would be most appreciated.

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Old 09-10-2005, 07:45 PM   #2
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I've got a little Energizer LED flashlight with a built in flourescent light tube,really lights things up.You can probably pick one up almost anywhere.Takes 4 AA batteries that would last a week of nights in the woods.Don't forget a bear cannister as well.
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Old 09-10-2005, 08:56 PM   #3
forevrwyld
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We use small black diamond headlamps and have become fond of what we call a "Candle Campfire". We put 3 or 4 candles on the ground or the floor of a L2 and surround them on 3 sides with the metal heat shield from our camp stove. Sort of a pretend campfire! I have found that we do that more and more even in areas outside the high peaks when the woods are wet or we are too tired to gather up wood.

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Old 09-12-2005, 08:36 PM   #4
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For night hiking I use a 4 led headlamp, the "Moonlight" and carry a tiny flashlight that gives a focused beam if I need to see farther down the trail. It's also just fine while at camp. I do have a very small (really tiny) Primus gas lantern for a propane canister. This is a new toy for me this year. It gives out a real comfort factor. I wouldn't bother with it if weight is a serious factor but it sure was nice canoe camping. Now that the days are shorter it might be a nice touch at night again. I used to just use a candle lantern. I did feel pretty comfortable using that hanging inside of a tent if I had to but I'd never use the Primus in there.
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Old 09-13-2005, 07:26 AM   #5
Becca
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This lite latern might be useful for an overnight

Found this on a search, could be exactly what I need for comfort factor. Just enough light to feel secure. Though the candles is really a good idea. Thanks for all your replies.


http://www.wildday.co.uk/images/Prod...itelantern.jpg



Coleman F1 Lite Lantern
The Coleman F1 Lite Lantern is an ultra lightweight high performance lantern with fine mesh globe for strength and durability. The lantern has been designed for trekking where every gram counts. The heat resistant textile carry pouch incorporates a lighweight protection cylinder for added convenience. Easy access to mantle with detachable mesh globe that is unbreakable. Cartridge not included. LANTERN SPECIFICATION: Operates off C100, C250 or C500 Coleman® cartridges Gas outflow: 25g/h Mantle: Standard Lumo mantle (size S) Dimensions: 52 x 52 x 10.4 cm 88 g
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Old 09-13-2005, 11:50 AM   #6
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I'm impressed with the weight of that lantern but I guess that's sans canister. i wouldn't want to put that thing on a lean-to or tent floor and I don't see how you could suspend it which would be a hazard anyway. It would be fine on a picnic table though.

Headlamps are your best bet. That's all I've ever used. My latest acquisition (I own a bunch) is Black Dianond Zenix IQ and allthough it's heavier than average its casts a great beam for night cross country skiing and for picking out predators' eyes through the thick forest. The beam dosn't weaken as the batteries drain and there's a tiny flashing "find me" light that changes colour as the batteries get emptied.
Get an Ion for a one ounce backup.
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Old 09-13-2005, 12:09 PM   #7
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http://www.coleman.com/coleman/colem...tegoryid=24757

I use to have a Coleman Xcursion Lantern that I liked until my buddy fell out of a tree and landed on it breaking it, but that’s another story. The lantern is a little bit bigger than a candle lantern but emits 10x the light. It uses the Coleman PowerMax Fuel. For a compressed gas lantern it works pretty well in the cold (I used mine at –10F though it didn’t burn as bright).

Lately I generally just use a headlamp and go to sleep when it gets dark. When I backpack I’m pretty well exhausted by the time I setup camp anyway.
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Old 09-13-2005, 12:19 PM   #8
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I just purchased a little flashlight that weighs about 4 AAA batteries. It's supposed to have a 200 hour life with these tiny little lights. My only purpose is to light up a few lines in paperbacks that I bring along to read while backpacking. [i also have a headlamp but that's not really for 'in camp'.]

I'm with lumberzac, I'm pretty beat when I turn in. Besides, hitting the rack a bit after dark (even in the fall) let's you get a really early start on the day -- maybe some sunrise or early morning gray photographs to start the ball rolling.
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Old 09-13-2005, 08:12 PM   #9
Becca
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I plan on having headlamps, and definetly flashlights for inside the tent, or for checking out noises during the middle of the night, but I just want something to give me comfort and light, till I get used to this wilderness camping. It's going to be a whole lot different then pitching a tent in a DEC campground. We plan on conquering the easier peaks and working ourselves up to the more challenging ones.
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Old 09-13-2005, 08:27 PM   #10
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Becca,
Last time I camped out in the ADKs I heard this weird noise right outside my tent. It went like this: uhhnn, zzzzz, rip, unngh, ****shtz, AGGHH!!
The next morning the entire area around my tent was flooded with blood and strewn with huge fly covered pieces of meat. I guess I should have left a light on in my tent, huh?

I mentioned this untoward occurance to the ranger and he merely shrugged his broad, manly shoulders and said that stuff like that happens all the time in the Adirondacks.

I don't know, seems pretty weird to me.
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Old 09-13-2005, 08:50 PM   #11
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Nice try Neil, LOL. I'm sure I won't even use the latern that much, just till I'm ready to tuck in, which I'm sure after a hard days hiking will not be long after darkness sets in. I've encountered Bears in the DEC campground, they make interesting shadows outside the tent. They dont scare away to well though, to used to careless campers leaving out food and ice chests. They don't want to leave a good snack. My German Shepherds when they go keep em away, but they won't be going hiking with me, they tend to keep people away too. Wait, on second thought, where are you planning your next hike?
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Old 09-13-2005, 10:20 PM   #12
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I just got a cmg (now Gerber) bonfire neat tent lantern. Its a lot like the candle lantern without the flame. It also has a high and low setting. I used it last weekend at my parents camp no electricity. it gave enough light in the bedroom to be able to change the little ones diaper.

Here is the link to Gerber Bonfire Blaze the cmg one had amber leds the new one has a white for high and red for low.
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Old 09-15-2005, 01:30 PM   #13
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The laterns sound like a nice idea but I think they eat fuel....I'm glad to hear that at least other person has done what I have and that is just use candles...I felt kind of strange sitting around a couple candles and candle lanterns but it worked pretty good....

Some tips...be prepared to camp in less that perfect areas (flat, open spaces are at a premium back in the hills), take a pair of light sneakers, flip flops or even rubber bottomed slippers to wear around camp (get those heavy, wet boots off), Take a pillow case to stuff clothes into to use when you sleep, plan food that minimizes cooking and clean-up (and don't take too much...like I always do), I take a camp chair (one of those things that fold up and have a back and a seat)....good for sleeping on also...squatting all the time for a few days or sitting on rocks and logs gets old), need a water purifier/filter, bear canister...get a decent non-stick cooking kit (makes clean up a lot easier). always take some fleece (even in summer...it gets cold at night)...

And enjoy.....

Pat

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Old 09-19-2005, 10:20 AM   #14
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I was just up for an overnight and I used a tiny little flashlight weighing about as much as 4 AAA batteries. I was able to use it for 4 hours and read a ton of a paperback. If you're doing any walking with gear, its not going to keep critters away but it definitely served its purpose.

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Old 09-20-2005, 01:10 PM   #15
llawhsoj
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here's a great old trick

Receipe for a portable lantern, with the stuff you carry anyway:
-learned from an old boss of mine who I used to guide for.

1 fuzzy/milky white nalgene non-lexan

1 source of light, (I like the petzel tikka best)


Empty contents of said nalgene
put light inside, or even better strap light to bottom, to that the light is shining into the nalgene.

What happens here is that based upon the composition of the nalgene, it disperses and difuses the light, changing the beam from the bulb into a broad based source of light. It pumps out as much light as candles, with no extra weight, it runs out when your batteries do (which if you have an LED mean almost never) and its made of things you already are carrying!

Sorry to all you candles folks out there but I just got tired of hauling them around and being concerned about spilling candle wax on my tent floor, or carrying the weight of a candle lantern (not to mention its glass, which just has too many downsides).

I've also done it sucessfully with a couple of different sources of light, mini-mags work well, or even the big puppies, but the biggest thing is finding the old non-lexan ones. A lexan one is almost perfectly clear, which needless to say does nothing for difusing the light. I can a clear and non clear on every trip since I learned this trick, so cool.

pecae,
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Old 09-20-2005, 02:07 PM   #16
RonandJon
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Thanks - Sounds like a great idea

Can't wait to give it a try. Don't have to worry about burning down the tent with candles, or blinding my tentmate with my headlamp, either.
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