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Old 07-24-2006, 08:03 AM   #1
savtrav
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Arrow NonMotorized Lakes?

On my visit next spring, I'm looking for a week in peace and quiet. How can I figure out which lakes don't allow motors on boats?
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Old 07-24-2006, 10:18 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by savtrav
On my visit next spring, I'm looking for a week in peace and quiet. How can I figure out which lakes don't allow motors on boats?
Generally you want to look for regions officially designated as "wilderness" or "canoe area" to avoid motors. There is a DEC web page list of motorless lakes. With few exceptions these are mostly smaller lakes and ponds.

According to the Resident's Committee to Protect the Adirondacks:
"Right now just four of the largest 100 lakes in the Adirondack Park are motorfree. There are 34 lakes greater than 1,000 acres that lie wholly or partly within the Park. Of these, only two Lake Lila and Little Tupper Lake are motorless. Of the 200 biggest lakes in the Park, only a dozen prohibit motorboats and jet skis."
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Old 07-25-2006, 12:47 PM   #3
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That's what is so special about the Whitney area

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns
According to the Resident's Committee to Protect the Adirondacks:
"Right now just four of the largest 100 lakes in the Adirondack Park are motorfree. There are 34 lakes greater than 1,000 acres that lie wholly or partly within the Park. Of these, only two Lake Lila and Little Tupper Lake are motorless. "
The fact that there are no motors on Lila and Little Tupper is a huge part of what makes them so appealing, to me at least. There's something really really nice about being on a fairly large body of water, and having NO motor noise, no boats flying across the lake. I guess this is why I like the St. Regis area so much also, though it's obviously on a smaller scale.

This is coming from someone who uses a motor boat fairly regularly too.... I think there is really something to be said for having designated areas for different types of uses. In alot of ways I wish the state would apply the same standard in other areas: ex- keep those snowmobiles off our ski/snowshoe trails, designate a pile of new snowmobile trails in some of the easment lands that get extremely limited use (often due to little water/mtns etc that we'd all hike, ski, or paddle to).
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Old 07-25-2006, 01:12 PM   #4
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Low's Lake/Bog River Flow comes to mind...
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Old 07-25-2006, 01:51 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin
Low's Lake/Bog River Flow comes to mind...
With the exception of the Boy Scout Camp Sabattis plus the one and only other private landowner on Low's, the DEC UMP calls for no more motorboats and the float planes were given a 5? year grace period to stop operations. The scouts would have little use for motorboats other than for safety. I keep trying to get an answer from the DEC on exactly when the float planes will actually be banned and no one either in the field or at Ray Brook HQ can give a straight answer. It's an Albany office issue.
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Old 07-25-2006, 09:17 PM   #6
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Motorless lakes ?

Wldns
Are you saying that other than Scouts the only remaining private holding on Low's is that ugly prominent camp on large peninsula off N shore ? Recall it's owned by Hamilton Co sheriff (?) who made some disparaging remarks in print re paddlers "ruining the place" This would be great news !
Read about TNC's purchase on S shore from Sabattis land Co. that precludes development on all 1800 acres but would be surprised if the the conservation easement purchased on 800 of those acres would forbid owners from motorized use ? Previously all shoreline owners were exempted from motor ban.

Unfortunately neither Lila nor Little Tupper are totally motor free. Whitneys (& others ? ) retained right to use <35 hp motors when they hornswaggled the state into terms of sale (They're allowed to keep fish, too !) Not to mention that "monstosity on the point" ..........
DEC also allow themselves to use motors on LTL, as they do on Lila. If you doubt it check contents of the storage shed W of Harrington brook mouth & just off N shore rd next to chained up "row"boat !
I'm thinking the only truly motorless lakes are those where it's just too difficult to get a motor onto

Last edited by Glen L; 07-25-2006 at 09:43 PM..
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Old 07-25-2006, 11:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glen L
Wldns
Are you saying that other than Scouts the only remaining private holding on Low's is that ugly prominent camp on large peninsula off N shore ? Recall it's owned by Hamilton Co sheriff (?) who made some disparaging remarks in print re paddlers "ruining the place" This would be great news !
That highly visible cabin is the only habitable structure visible on the entire flow as a private motorboat destination. I have seen the boats in the woods on the south bay shore east of Sabattis camp, but have never seen any activity there. Yes, I was at more than one of those heated meetings where he was vocally against "those canoes and kayaks as the real polluters". As you know, in addition to the recent south shore negotiations, TNC is with Bog Lake also very close to final agreement for public access, without motors.
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Old 07-25-2006, 11:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns
Yes, I was at more than one of those heated meetings where he was vocally against "those canoes and kayaks as the real polluters".


Family tree = straight line?
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Old 07-26-2006, 05:57 PM   #9
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Timing is everything

Actually, if one ventures out @ the right time the chances of avoiding motorized boats is very good. (Well, surely increased anyway)
Wife & I have spent an entire very early May weekend in 2 different yrs in narrows section of Lake George w/o seeing (or hearing) a single motor. (This is an area which I understand is over-run w/ the things in season). Going mid-week then or late in season should even further increase those odds. Similarly we've camped on Saranacs in very early May & late Oct & seen very few motorboats (some hunters heading to or from their favorite spots)

Consider a river trip if you really wanna avoid motorboats. Put a shallow rapid between you & rd accessible launch & they're left behind. Put a couple more behind you & may leave most of paddlers behind also
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Old 07-26-2006, 06:53 PM   #10
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I'd like to see more motorless lakes, but we need balance IMHO. Maybe horsepower restrictions on some too. That way the handicapped and elderly that can't paddle can enjoy God's gift too. As far as jetskis are concerned they are totally worthless and a waste of gas, IMHO they should banned. Like I said balance is the key.
I hope they allow some of the float planes to remain. It's nice to be able to see the park from the air. Again, sensible restrictions could apply.

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Old 07-26-2006, 08:41 PM   #11
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I agree with Qtip with regards to Jet Skis, I find that a lot of the people on Jet Skis
seem to feel the need to approach other vessels with their craft when they have the whole lake at their disposal. Seems fair to allow use of motorized water craft fo rthe handicapped, but think that it should be restricted to electric trolling motors on medium to small sized lakes and ponds as part of a push to reduce our reliance on gas and it's affects on the climate. A lake the size of say 4th Lake in the Fulton
Chain, should be the yard stick in which bigger motors can be used.

Just my 2 cents
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Old 07-26-2006, 11:14 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Qtip
That way the handicapped and elderly that can't paddle can enjoy God's gift too.
I just returned home from spending an evening with a childhood friend visiting from the west coast at a family gathering for him. His father is 80 years old, and is preparing to solo race in the 90 Miler Adirondack Canoe Classic this year. He's not in the best of health with bad knees and back, still he's got enough gumption to try. My crew is not racing this year, but I'll be around to give him pointers and help him train during the next 6 weeks, and to assist during the race itself.

Not all elderly are as spry as he is, but many of them and even many handicapped are more able than they may think. They might need considerable assistance and a helping hand from more capable friends, but still they may get out on those motorless lakes. For those who truly cannot control a paddle or sit in a canoe, a guideboat powered by a guide with oars would be as memorable an experience and comfortable as a small motorboat, and a whole lot more nature friendly in God's country. Guides for hire are still alive and well through NYSOGA.
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Old 07-27-2006, 10:12 PM   #13
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I have always wondered - does the prohibition of motorized boats include electrics? A motor is a motor, but electrics are silent and pollution free. I don't have one, and my little outboard doesn't run. I generally either paddle a cedar stripped canoe or row one of my guideboats. Just curious....

JM

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Old 07-27-2006, 10:31 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Michne
I have always wondered - does the prohibition of motorized boats include electrics?
Yes, unless otherwise stated electrics are included in the definition of "motors". There are a few lakes that may allow electrics only, and some allow low HP gasoline motors (3 or 10 HP for example). There were a lot of 9.9 HP motors manufactured to stay below a 10 HP limit commonly imposed in small lakes around the country. Any of those examples on lakes in NY will be clearly marked as such in DEC publications. Otherwise if the restriction says no motors, it means no motors at all.
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Old 07-31-2006, 11:26 PM   #15
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Just chiming in to say thanks for starting and responding to this thread on a very important topic. I had my canoe up in the ADKs for the first time early this month and as a very green paddler, I was looking for quiet places to just practice j-strokes and have a little fun. I must say, I was surprised to learn how few of the medium to large ADK bodies of water are motorized, even in and near the state campgrounds.

I think I read somewhere that if a body of water has a certain percentage of privately-owned shoreline, it can by definition be motorized. Since there are many, many bodies of water with lots of private shoreline, I was surprised and disappointed to learn there are also bodies of water with entirely state-owned shoreline that are still motorized. For example, Paradox Lake is fairly large and has lots of private shoreline, so I would expect it to be motorized. But why does it's little neighbor Putnam Pond, completely surrounded by public land, need to be open to motors as well? I'm not just complaining or making a rhetorical question here, I'm really curious.

Matt
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Old 07-31-2006, 11:51 PM   #16
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Try St. Regis Canoe Area. Check out interior ponds esp. if you have a canoe that can be easily carried (Kevlar), not many people go into these areas.
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Old 08-06-2006, 01:43 PM   #17
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Yeah, it's a real shame.

If I'm not mistaken - the area to the north of Long Lake Village on Long Lake is primarily a wilderness type setting, despite the fact that the land on the western shore is privately owned - but they still allow motorized vehicles. Wouldn't this be an ideal place to put a restriction on motorized vehicles?
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Old 08-06-2006, 10:03 PM   #18
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I spent the day today paddling with a friend who is preparing to paddle solo in the 90 Mile Canoe Classic. We were on one of the very few heavily populated private access lakes of any size that is totally motorless. It was amazingly peaceful and quiet, even though many people were out and about sitting on shore and dock. Most camps were quite invisible viewed from the water, barely hidden by a layer of trees. That's the way the an Adirondack lake is meant to be enjoyed. BTW, my friend training for the 90 miler just celebrated his 80th birthday.
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Old 08-07-2006, 01:44 PM   #19
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We also spent yesterday paddling on part of the 90 mile section so our friend could check it out. He's less than 80 though. We put in on Raquette Lake ( big lake with big boats) and paddled up the Marian River. We met 1 pontoon boat on the Raquette Lake end and no other paddlers. There were several boats on Utowana Lake that were not considerate of kayaks at all. Several motor boats on Eagle Lake and of course many boats and even floatplanes on Blue Mountain Lake but most were considerate. For such a beautiful day I thought there would have been more boat traffic. I was glad to see very few Jet Skis.
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Old 08-07-2006, 01:52 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hakuna Matada
We also spent yesterday paddling on part of the 90 mile section so our friend could check it out. He's less than 80 though. We put in on Raquette Lake ( big lake with big boats) and paddled up the Marian River. We met 1 pontoon boat on the Raquette Lake end and no other paddlers. There were several boats on Utowana Lake that were not considerate of kayaks at all. Several motor boats on Eagle Lake and of course many boats and even floatplanes on Blue Mountain Lake but most were considerate. For such a beautiful day I thought there would have been more boat traffic. I was glad to see very few Jet Skis.
Ahhh, Utowana, "the lake that never ends." It's bean shape is deceiving because you think you see the end in the distance, but as you round the gradual curve the end just keeps getting farther and farther away. Another name.. "you dont wanna" paddle this lake. Similarly, Blue Mountain is "the mountain that never gets any closer". You have it in your sights on your bow from the time you enter Raquette Lake, but it just seems to never get any closer over the next couple of hours.

Such strange things come to mind as you zone out near the end of that first race day.
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