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Old 10-12-2012, 07:40 PM   #1
DSettahr
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"Nuisance" Bear shot and killed in Long Lake, resident who was feeding it upset

http://www.denpubs.com/news/2012/oct...bear-shot-dec/

Quote:
Morrissey fed the bear a mixture of milk and maple syrup after it showed up on her property about five months ago.

“That little thing came to the house, and it was crying and crying,” Morrissey said.

The bawling bear enjoyed the easy meal and began to frequent her yard, so Morrissey started to prepare nightly feasts for it, sometimes offering big bowls of macaroni and potatoes.

Soon, the animal made itself comfortable.

“I have an opening under my porch, and that bear at nighttime would come, and he’d get underneath there and sleep,” Morrissey said.
Wow.
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Old 10-12-2012, 07:55 PM   #2
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Seasonal or permanent resident?
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Old 10-13-2012, 01:44 PM   #3
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There are brilliant people born everyday! I wonder what she would have fed a Great White shark???

I'm sure the GOV will give this top priority!

Last edited by Neil; 10-15-2012 at 02:34 PM..
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Old 10-13-2012, 01:54 PM   #4
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Darwin has more work to do.
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Old 10-13-2012, 07:48 PM   #5
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It's been said many times/many places "A fed bear is a dead bear". Even a well-mannered "domestic" animal can go rogue and bite the hand that feeds it, why do people think that a wild animal poses"no threat" to people? This individual should be charged with wildlife endangerment and endangering the community. Leave wild animals wild is my opinion. If an animal is meant to die of natural causes in the wild then let it occur naturally, if it can be relocated then relocate it.
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Old 10-15-2012, 12:51 PM   #6
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I agree 1,000% Scatterbone... Leave wild animals WILD.
I dont even put up bird feeders anymore because of the other animals it would attract to my yard.
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Old 10-15-2012, 04:06 PM   #7
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Agree that the problem was created by her feeding a wild animal, and that the animal had become a nuisance and a hazard, and that euthanizing it was probably the right course.

But if the story is true as written, I have a little problem on the "other side" as well. Did a Conservation Officer really show up by surprise, walk onto someone's private property without permission, and open fire with a firearm? I have a problem with that, even if it was target practice in a sand pit.

We should have the facts about that side too, before we all pile on this woman.
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:00 PM   #8
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There are a lot of reasons to not feed bears, but I am not sure public safety is one of them.

I am aware of no evidence that suggests that habituated bears are more likely to attack humans.

In fact, it may be just the opposite. The only data and studies that I have ever been able to find on this subject suggest that habituated bears may be LESS likely to harm or injure humans. For example, there are well documented situations where communities have had bears living among them for years (because of intentional feeding, or open dumps, etc) without incident of attack.

Heck, the Adirondacks are a good example of this in some way. We have been interacting with habituated bears for decades. At our campgrounds, at our summer camps, at our homes, and most notably in the High Peaks (hi Yellow-Yellow!) Yet there has never, not once, been a recorded fatal attack.

In fact, while deaths associated with black bear attacks are infinitesimally rare, where they do seem to happen the most is in very remote areas (Canada, mostly) where the bears are less likely to encounter and become habituated to humans.

It runs counter to intuition on some level, and the perception we have of bears as being very dangerous, but the evidence seems to be pretty one sided on this issue.

Last edited by Holdstrong; 10-15-2012 at 10:32 PM..
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:34 PM   #9
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This wikipedia article may be of interest: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._North_America

Some of my favorites (all black bears):


Quote:
Kandra was a bear caretaker on property that kept exotic pets. The bear was out of its cage for feeding. Prior to the attack, the property's owner had his license to exhibit animals revoked, but was still allowed to keep the animals on his property.
Quote:
Walz, whose husband had an expired license to keep exotic animals, was attacked while cleaning her pet bear's cage. She tried to distract the bear by throwing dog food to the opposite end of the cage. A neighbor shot and killed the bear.
Quote:
Munson had been feeding bears for a decade, and was repeatedly warned by wildlife officials. After a bear was injured in a fight with an older and bigger bear, Munson left food out to help the injured bear. The older bear came back to Munson's property, forced its way past a wire fence, and mauled Munson. Later, wildlife officials killed two bears on Munson's property. One of the bears had a necropsy which revealed evidence that it consumed Munson.
Quote:
A bear trained to wrestle humans entered its owner's home and attacked the owner's friend, Orser in her bedroom.
Quote:
While carnival workers were setting up, a bear was taken out of its cage and chained to a tree. Johns, whose parents were carnival workers, walked by and was attacked. The bear had previously attacked children.
Quote:
A pet bear dragged Tremper into its cage at the Ponderosa Trailer Park in Prescott, Arizona. The bear's owner shot and killed it.
Quote:
After feeding a bear in its cage, Huckins was chased and killed. The bear also injured three other people, and was eventually shot and killed with thirteen gun shots.
Quote:
Langley owned a gas station where he kept the bear. After entering the bear's cage to feed it, Langley and his helper were attacked. The bear was shot and killed.
Quote:
On his walk home from school, Taylor stopped to feed an apple to a bear tethered in front of an inn. The bear mauled Taylor and crushed him against a wire cage. Motorists stopped and used sticks and stones to try to separate the bear from Taylor.

Eventually, a man operating a nearby roadside stand came and shot and killed the bear. An examination revealed that the bear hadn't eaten in two days. The Inn had two bears that were trapped five years previously in the Adirondacks, and were frequently fed by passers-by. Both bears were killed.
Quote:
A female black bear who recently had her cubs taken away killed her feeder, Joyce. This occurred at the John C. Thompson Park Zoo.
Quote:
After a bear escaped from a cage at Elysian Grove Pleasure Park, Buss Laird ran with her infant child in a go-cart. The bear grabbed and killed the baby.
I think there's evidence enough that we ought to be giving bears a wide birth, regardless of how "domesticated" they are.

Last edited by DSettahr; 10-15-2012 at 10:48 PM..
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:50 PM   #10
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Bears are cute, right?? All wild animals quickly revert to their natural instincts given certain conditions. Lest we lose track of the danger, I want to remind everyone about the tragic attack by a trained and "domesticated" chimp which occurred here in Connecticut in the recent past. The victim, a friend of the owner, had her hands and face torn off and her eyes gouged out. The best solution to the bear's situation in Long Lake would have been removal to another area as soon as she appeared in the very beginning. Incidentally, I think that this must have been the bear that I and my companions spotted near the public boat launch at Long Lake back on Labor Day. The whole thing, sadly, could have been avoided
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Old 10-16-2012, 08:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
I think there's evidence enough that we ought to be giving bears a wide birth, regardless of how "domesticated" they are.
A wide berth, absolutely.

But as that wiki article perfectly illustrates, deadly black bear encounters are exceedingly rare.

The incidents you quoted span 100+ years of human/bear interactions, and a good portion of them involved captive, abused, or injured bears... with the majority of the rest involving bears in very remote areas where human habituation (which is not domestication) was unlikely to occur.

Over that same century of time you would be far more likely to have been killed by (insert fun fact here... like lightning, or dogs, or bees, or even deer)

Contrast that with the studies and reports of black bears and human communities coexisting for long periods of time without incidents, and I think it would be hard for anyone interested in the subject to not begin to re-think the conventional wisdom when it comes to this animal.

Now, don't get me wrong, as I've already stated, there are LOTS of reasons to not feed bears... but this idea that if a Black Bear gets used to eating from someone's garbage (bird feeder, campsite, whatever) that we should kill it before it starts harming humans, is simply not supported by any data that I've seen.
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:04 PM   #12
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Perhaps we can all agree that our interactions with wildlife in the 'dacks should be limited to viewing from a safe distance, and with bears, making a big racket and considering them as potentially life-threatening. Whether you are attacked by a wilderness bear or a semi-wilderness bear will mean little after the fact. It seems to me that there is no such thing as a "safe" bear. A good read that has more than a few bear encounters in it is Alan Kesselheim's book, "Water and Sky" (http://www.amazon.com/Water-Sky-Refl.../dp/1555910467). This fellow is an excellent author of wilderness adventure, by the way...
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:48 PM   #13
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I remember reading about arrests for feeding deer and found the following on this website:

Quote:
During July, seven people were charged in the Old Forge area with violating the statewide ban on feeding deer. In an effort to curb this illegal activity, Environmental Conservation Officer Russell Ritzel has pro-actively patrolled, and at times conducted stationary surveillance of areas in Old Forge where tourists attempt to feed deer by hand.
I didn't search too thoroughly but couldn't find anything about laws against feeding bear...
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:01 PM   #14
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I didn't search too thoroughly but couldn't find anything about laws against feeding bear...
http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/3928.html

§187.1 Black bear feeding
(a) "Purpose." The purpose of this section is to protect public safety while conserving New York's black bear populations. The deliberate, intentional feeding of black bears is prohibited.
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Old 10-17-2012, 04:56 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns View Post
http://www.dec.ny.gov/regs/3928.html

§187.1 Black bear feeding
(a) "Purpose." The purpose of this section is to protect public safety while conserving New York's black bear populations. The deliberate, intentional feeding of black bears is prohibited.
while i haven't recently read the section of the law dealing with feeding of bear - i remember when the law was passed that it included the unintentional feeding or attracting of bear. the first time involved a warning with subsequent events/offenses calling for a fine.
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Old 10-17-2012, 07:58 PM   #16
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Is there any law against feeding black files, mosquitoes and deer flies? It's just that I see it happen all the time.
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Old 10-17-2012, 08:05 PM   #17
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Is there any law against feeding black files, mosquitoes and deer flies? It's just that I see it happen all the time.
Last time I checked, the law was that you have to feed them.
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:47 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by dchris7833 View Post
Perhaps we can all agree that our interactions with wildlife in the 'dacks should be limited to viewing from a safe distance, and with bears, making a big racket and considering them as potentially life-threatening. Whether you are attacked by a wilderness bear or a semi-wilderness bear will mean little after the fact. It seems to me that there is no such thing as a "safe" bear. A good read that has more than a few bear encounters in it is Alan Kesselheim's book, "Water and Sky" (http://www.amazon.com/Water-Sky-Refl.../dp/1555910467). This fellow is an excellent author of wilderness adventure, by the way...
Actually the best thing we can do is learn about the behavior of all of the animals we are likely to run across. I have been in the proximity of bears, black and grizzly several times in my travels. Never have I been threatened nor felt in danger in their presence. I was armed with the knowledge of what to and what not to do. Only predator that I was ever concerned about was a Cougar in South Dakota. In that particular case, being well informed of what to do preventer an encounter.

There ws also this squirrel once that gave me great concern, but that's best left for another thread.
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:53 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Holdstrong View Post
A wide berth, absolutely.

But as that wiki article perfectly illustrates, deadly black bear encounters are exceedingly rare.

The incidents you quoted span 100+ years of human/bear interactions, and a good portion of them involved captive, abused, or injured bears...
We have had two recent examples in the ADK's that I can think about off the top of my head which are warning signs of increased danger due to habituation. These will never make Wikipedia or any statistics, along with many other encounters thoughout the country each year I'm sure.

1- Off duty State Trooper near Marcy Dam a year or two ago who shot a bear that was approaching him and his companion, ignoring their food.

2- Yellow-yellow's recent day-time pack stealing event in front of a loud group of hikers.

Anything other than wildlife turning tail and running at the sight of humans shows a loss of fear and an increase in potential danger. Studies of cougars in Colorado have well documented the progression of habituation leading to human injuries and fatalities.
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Old 10-19-2012, 02:35 PM   #20
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Strange that in a world of 7billion people that "cause" the extinction of dozens of species "daily", that we still call the wildlife dangerous. Who are we kidding? Sounds like insecure people if you ask me. Always justifying killing, always saying how spooky the outcome may have been. On average 45,000 people a year die in auto accidents, are you going to hunt them down anytime soon? They/We are immeasurably more dangerous (actual danger) Who "exactly" did this bear harm? Not "would-of or could-of" or post some unrelated example. I have known many Bear over my life and every single one is different - they aren't robots. Assuming anything is just that, assuming. The only "actual" harm, was caused "to" the bear not at all "from" the bear. If ignorance of Wildlife is bliss, we sure have a happy bunch of humans. I say the woman should be left alone albeit explained the dangers of caring about wildlife in todays insane world. A fed bear us a dead bear because people, are insane. To the women out there, if you read this post I just wanted to say I'm sorry for what happened to the bear. Its true in todays world you cant feed bears, but its not "your" fault. There needs to be a booklet on the dangers of living near humans...
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