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-   -   Gear Checklists (http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=63)

Jeff 11-13-2003 12:24 AM

Gear Checklists
 
Here are some checklists that are helpful for a variety of outings. Please enjoy and be safety conscious.

For additional gear, ideas, tips and tricks of the trade, keep coming back to ADK FORUM.

Remember, from experience, Better Safe than Sorry!


http://alavigne.homeip.net/newHomePa...List/index.jsp

Wildernessphoto 04-23-2004 09:57 PM

Day hiking checklist & notes
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hi Jeff,
I posted this elsewhere, but thought it might be helpful to others. This is noted from a class I teach on day hiking. It covers some basic equipment if you get stuck in a situation where you have to stay out overnight.

-Gary-

The Photography of Gary F. Dean

LaRocqueOShaughnessy 06-17-2009 03:11 AM

Hey, I'm reading SAS Survival Handbook.

Its got a cool little little list to go by.

"Before any journey or expedition make a check list and ask yourself the following questions:

- How long will I be away? How much food do I need for this period and do I need to carry water?

- Have I the right clothing for the climate and enough of it? Is one pair of boots enough or, because of the surface conditions and the amount of walking, should I take a standby pair?

- What special equipment do I need for the terrain?

- What medical kit is appropriate?"

I know this might seem like 5th grade stuff for most of you, but when I first started coming to this site I knew almost absolutely nothing about this stuff. My brain wasn't functioning in the way that it does for you guys. Preparatation and survival.

motorman 03-11-2011 10:33 PM

NP Trail this fall......
 
I'll be hiking the Long Lake to LP section of the N-P Trail this fall. I'm a recent 46er, so I've done all the day hikes and the few multi-day trips necessary to get the harder to reach peaks and ranges. But those were hike in to a lean-to and stay for 3-4 days endeavours. The 50 lb. pack was OK for 4-5 miles, but that won't cut it for a trip on the NP trail

Now I'm looking at carrying for me (and probably all the food and tent) for both of us.

I'm looking to trim my weight down to the bare minimum.

I'll carry the 40 oz. tent and the freeze dried food for two. We'll have redundant stoves and water filters.

I'm planning on using about 3oz of fuel a day, heating water for breakfast and dinner, with tea at night. planning on 1-2 days extra.

I'll take freeze dried food, but plan on some nice heavy brownies, baked by my daughter.


Any other words of wisdom?

crkmeup 03-12-2011 02:48 AM

You may want to consider your own food prep using freezer bag cookiing and alcohol stoves or a wood burning stove. You can cut stove and fuel weight a lot and save lots on food costs. Look at everything in both of your packs and make sure it is all needed.

WinterWarlock 03-12-2011 08:38 AM

Motorman

Check out HawkVittles, too...if you don't want to be drying and making your own, his are by far the best out there.

40 oz tent seems a bit heavy - what are you carrying? Have you considered a tarp of some sort? I guess if you're splitting up carrying, it won't be too bad...plus keep in mind you may want to carry a bear can, too, which are not only heavy, but bulky.

Archerx515x 06-04-2012 07:17 AM

Multi Day Hiking/Camping Gear list for ADK
 
No Matter how I try to cut this list down I find myself always coming back to these pretty esential items. At this point just need to purchase these items at the lightest weight possible, Please comment. These are items I plan on carrying on a multi day High peaks hiking trip...




___Pack
___Pack Cover
___Tent with stakes and poles
___Sleeping Bag
___Sleeping Pad
___Inflatable Pillow
___ Map
___ Compass
___ Water Bladder
___ Water Bottle
___ Steri Pen
___ Headlamp & Flashlight
___ Matches
___ Backup Fire Starter
___ First-aid kit *(Replenish Meds)
___ Knife
___Multi tool
___ Sunscreen & Lip Balm
___Personal Kit (TP/Toothpaste/Brush/Wipes Deodorant, Etc.)
___Camp Towel & Soap
___ Insect repellent & Head net (if bug season)
___Mess Kit & Spork
___Pocket Stove (Pocket Rocket)
___Fuel
___Camp Saw
___ 50-foot nylon cord
___ Resalable plastic bags
___Bear Canister
___MERís, snacks, candy, drink mix, etc.
___ Whistle

Footwear

___ Boots/Trail Shoes
___ Gaiters
___ Hiking socks (2)


Clothing

___ Convertible nylon pants/shorts (2)
___ Polypropylene underwear (shirts & pants) (2)
___ Long-sleeved compression shirt
___ Thermo underwear
___ Rain jacket and pants
___ Gloves
___ Wide-brimmed hat
___ Fleece jacket

Accessories

___ Wallet & ID
___ Money
___ Hiking Poles
___ Repair/sewing kit
___ Pen and paper
___ Reading Glasses
___ Sunglasses
___Ear Plugs

Gadgets & Extras
___ Watch
___ Cell phone
___ Camera
___ GPS
___ Printed Week long Weather Report (Previous days works as good fire starter)
___ Field guides & Books
___ Binoculars
___*Batteries (AA & AAA)

DuctTape 06-04-2012 05:13 PM

that is quite a list Archer. I know for me, many of those are not necessities on any trip and some might only be necessary (or is it desirable?) for some trips. Everyone is different in their needs/wants.

Here is what I would 86 from that list:, YMMV:

tent stakes (I use sticks)
pillow (I use spare clothing in a stuff sack)
bladder or bottle (not both)
headlamp or flashlight (not both)
multitool (my knife has a can opener)
deodorant (ask Ian, he smelled me after a hike once)
half the clothing on the list (except for socks)
wallet and money (really? ID I carry)
Accessories -Gadgets and extras by definition are not necessities but you might desire to carry them though I cannot fathom why one would bring their wallet. (ID, some cash and a CC perhaps)

Other than that, the only reason I carry less is because many items I have serve more than one function. For example my sleeping quilt is also a wearable serape so I do not need a fleece jacket for warmth. My cooking system is also my eating system. I write on the back of printed maps.

Have fun out there.

Swamp Booger 06-04-2012 08:22 PM

Archer, you listed MER's...do you mean MRE's (as in military Ready to Eat meals)? I've used them for canoe camping trips, but I would think those are a bit heavy for back-packing. Instead, I would highly recommend dehydrated meals from Hawk Vittles and/or Pack-It-Gourmet, as they are much lighter than MRE's.

Justin 06-04-2012 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Archerx515x (Post 186998)
These are items I plan on carrying on a multi day High peaks hiking trip...




_Camp Saw

If you're planning on going to the Eastern High Peaks region, don't bother bringing a saw.

ADKpete 06-04-2012 09:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Justin (Post 187045)
If you're planning on going to the Eastern High Peaks region, don't bother bringing a saw.

Why wouldn't you bring a saw, regardless of where you're going?

Justin 06-04-2012 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ADKpete (Post 187046)
Why wouldn't you bring a saw, regardless of where you're going?

To save on pack weight.

ADKpete 06-04-2012 10:32 PM

For the 8.4 ounces the saw weighs (Gerber Gator pack saw) I think it would be more logical to eliminate something of less importance in a possible emergency or maybe not worry about 8.4 ounces as it doesn't look like he will be hiking lite.

DuctTape 06-05-2012 12:08 AM

8.4 oz is more than 5% of my summer gear weight. When I do carry a saw (on all but long backpacking trips) it is less thanj 4 oz. While a saw may be useful in an emergency, I don't carry everything that could be useful in an emergency. The best item in those situations isn't on my back, it is between my ears.

Archerx515x 06-06-2012 01:05 AM

I did mean MRE's, I use to buy and still have a few Mt. house ones I like but since then I have bought my own pre packaged items and break them down and real seal with a food savor, just add water. As for the camp saw, I have a folding campmore saw, I prob wouldnt bring it on any hikes to the high peaks that was just on my list for general backpacking and camping

redhawk 06-06-2012 10:20 AM

If you are carrying a gps or a cell phone, the watch is redundant since both of the above will give you the time. I also don't carry a cell phone since reception is either very spotty or non existant in the Adirondacks.

I also question the need for a camp saw except for in the colder months.

MRE's are heavy for backpacking food. Better choices out there.

As mentioned: wallet? I carry my Drivers license (for Id purposes so they know where to send the body), a CC and a couple of bills in a small zip lock.

Archerx515x 06-07-2012 12:19 AM

Wallet, watch camp saw are all extreamly lightweight items, I would always carry cell phone I have 16 gb of music on my SD card on the phone to help pass my time at camp at night, Wallet with money and Id credit card if im in town to buy stuff, they weigh next tonight. I am looking more towards how to keep the weight in my pack down, not what i am carrying. What are they alternitives to the MER's? how can you get much lighter than packaged chicken and rice where all you do is add water? I take Mt. House or other packaged foods and re-package them with my food savor.

DuctTape 06-07-2012 06:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Archerx515x (Post 187157)
Wallet, watch camp saw are all extreamly lightweight items, I would always carry cell phone I have 16 gb of music on my SD card on the phone to help pass my time at camp at night, Wallet with money and Id credit card if im in town to buy stuff, they weigh next tonight. I am looking more towards how to keep the weight in my pack down, not what i am carrying. What are they alternitives to the MER's? how can you get much lighter than packaged chicken and rice where all you do is add water? I take Mt. House or other packaged foods and re-package them with my food savor.

All items have mass, however small. Small amounts do add up. If you are serious about getting your gear weight down, you need to account for ALL weights, however negligible they may seem to you, for the sum of them is considerable. I would suggest a postal scale, for then you will know the actual weight of all the items in your pack.

Mt house et el are not MRE's. They are freeze dried, quite light but not very calorie dense for their weight or volume (meaning you need more. MRE's do not need reconstituting, they are "Meals Ready to Eat", they are heavy because they still contain their water. Other options besides MRE's, or Freeze Dried (like Mt House) are HawkVittles (more bang for your buck both calorie and taste) or make your own. My food weight

redfox1939 08-01-2012 01:48 AM

Also thinking before you go is the best way to ensure you'll have a nice hike. As in life, it's always the little things that make or break your time spent in the woods.

________________________

Sedona Guided Tours

Tower 1 09-16-2012 10:55 AM

Cutting down on the bulk can be as important as the weight.
For water bottles i use military canteens with canteen covers which also holds my metal canteen cups. these are good boiling water and heating small meals.
It can also be hooked to the outside of your pack saving room. They also make canteen cup stoves that will all fit in the cover. The best part is that all of this stuff can be picked up at army/navy surplus stores stores really cheap.
A 3$ canteen works just as good as a 20$ water bottle.


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