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TEG
01-29-2007, 06:30 PM
Hypothetical:
Let's say I want to get lost. Leave the country, runaway for a little while. Live on my feet for some time and really learn about the world.

Any of ya'll gone overseas and seen some land outside of the typical tourist trap bullshiz? Any military men that served in some territory they'd like to go back to? I guess I am the age of adventure and wouldn't mind getting lost.. or found?

Maybe this is too open ended. I'm assuming that the plethora of knowledge this forum has within it's members in regards to the Adirondacks is also accompanied by knowledge of foreign locations of equal magnitude.


Tod

redhawk
01-29-2007, 06:36 PM
Siberia, Africa, The Outback, New Zealand, South America.

I haven't been to Siberia but it would suit me I think.

Wldrns
01-29-2007, 06:58 PM
Hypothetical:
Let's say I want to get lost. Leave the country, runaway for a little while. Live on my feet for some time and really learn about the world. Sounds like an ad for the Peace Corps. (http://www.peacecorps.gov/) :D

Dick
01-29-2007, 07:51 PM
Hypothetically, how long of a little while? What specifically do you mean by "live on my feet?" What aspects of world learning do you hope to learn about? What do you mean by "equal magnitude?" Are you talking about steeping yourself in new cultures, or only hiking?

I'm sure this country is on no one's radar screen, but years ago I spent some time in Taegu, Korea (13 mo.), did a little hiking (not yet being a hiker, I'm not sure I called it that!), visited a lot of out-of-the-way towns hamlets away from what you call the "typical tourist trap bullshiz," made friends, (performed a concert), did as many non-military things as I had time for, and it all made a lasting impression on me. All was courtesy of Uncle Sam, of course. It's probably hard for some here who know me to picture me helping a farming family shovel dirt in a rice paddy to plug leaks, but that was one of my many experiences, done gladly...

(Sorry, "tourist bullshiz" follows:)
http://stephyinkorea.blogspot.com/search/label/Hiking
http://www.lifeinkorea.com/travel2/Taegu
http://www.lifeinkorea.com/Activities/hiking/index.cfm
http://jetiranger.tripod.com/things_i_like_about_korea/index.album?i=1
http://www.uwcsea.edu.sg/expeditions/groupC/korea.htm
http://www.waderson.com/1037-Fly-Fishing-The-South-Korean-Backcountry.html
http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/trips/card_korea.aspx
http://www.travel-wise.com/asia/korea/korea-adventure-travel.html
http://blogs.bootsnall.com/skookum/


Dick

TEG
01-29-2007, 10:15 PM
Hypothetically, how long of a little while? What specifically do you mean by "live on my feet?" What aspects of world learning do you hope to learn about? What do you mean by "equal magnitude?" Are you talking about steeping yourself in new cultures, or only hiking?


Time wise, six months to a year. By living on my feet I'm referring to what I see as living with everything I need on my back and my feet being what move me from place to place.

Aspects of world learning? Anything and everything non western.

What I meant by "equal magnitude": There's a wealth of information among the members here on this forum. I figured some of you more experienced folk would have additional knowledge of similar interests outside the Adirondack Mountains.

I'd like to spend time in small towns away from cities. Hamlet, I like that term. Working preferably. Farm hand, deck hand, mover of anything heavy and cumbersome. Sticky situations, fear for your life situations, happy situations, the entire spectrum.


Dick, thank you for those links. Great photos and hours of good stuff.

Hobbitling
01-30-2007, 08:54 AM
Dont know how this fits with the traveling around by foot idea, but I like the peace corps idea, but I would go with a smaller NGO, which would allow you to do shorter trips, like 6 months or so, and often avoids the lumbering bureacracy and politics of goverrnment aid. That way you can do some good while you're at it. And staying in one place for a while will let you really soak in the culture more than always being on the move. Go to idealist.org to search for volunteer oportunities. Then go get a language course from the book store and start studying! Knowing at least a little bit of the language helps a lot.

I spent several summers in Honduras during and after college. Mostly I was the only gringo in town. There were plenty of sticky, scary, happy situations. Hurricanes, Gangs, lots of parties and dancing, and good food, and lots of hard work.

Little Rickie
01-30-2007, 01:58 PM
Hypothetical:
Let's say I want to get lost. Leave the country, runaway for a little while. Live on my feet for some time and really learn about the world.

Any of ya'll gone overseas and seen some land outside of the typical tourist trap bullshiz? Any military men that served in some territory they'd like to go back to? I guess I am the age of adventure and wouldn't mind getting lost.. or found?

Maybe this is too open ended. I'm assuming that the plethora of knowledge this forum has within it's members in regards to the Adirondacks is also accompanied by knowledge of foreign locations of equal magnitude.


Tod

Are you giving up on you trail work plans for this year?

Me personally...I'd bum around Europe.
Australia & New Zealand would be close seconds.

TEG
01-30-2007, 02:03 PM
Never giving up on trails. Like I've said before, I'll do that until I die or I tear my rotator cuff when I'm 63 and cant work any longer. Trails for the most part though, is seasonal work. Which leaves me time to pursue other interests.

Peace corp is a neat idea and I'm glad there's programs like that. But if I go over seas, I dont plan on studying any languages prior to my departure and I definitely dont plan on having any form of itinerary. I always like to work, money or no money. I think it's vital for your stability, both physical and mental. Ideally, I can see working for food and shelter.

redhawk
01-30-2007, 03:31 PM
Never giving up on trails. Like I've said before, I'll do that until I die or I tear my rotator cuff when I'm 63 and cant work any longer. Trails for the most part though, is seasonal work. Which leaves me time to pursue other interests.

Peace corp is a neat idea and I'm glad there's programs like that. But if I go over seas, I dont plan on studying any languages prior to my departure and I definitely dont plan on having any form of itinerary. I always like to work, money or no money. I think it's vital for your stability, both physical and mental. Ideally, I can see working for food and shelter.

Quite a few years ago. I was invited to stay with a traditional tribe of the Kayapo Indians living by a stream near the Japura River in Brazil. They were considered a "primitive" tribe by the non-indian people, probably because of their life style. Only two members of the tribe ever went into "civilization" to trade for goods.

For several months I lived with them and for an "uncivilized" people, they were the gentlest, least stresssed, kindest and most Spiritual people I have even known in my life.

That was the most defining time in my life. One of my few regrets in life is that I always intended to go back, and never have.

yet

Mitikuye Oyasin (We are all related)

Somewhere in the forum is a report about that experience.

kwc
01-30-2007, 04:29 PM
Hawk's experience (and others) are here: http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=453&highlight=Kayapo

TEG
01-30-2007, 04:53 PM
For several months I lived with them and for an "uncivilized" people, they were the gentlest, least stresssed, kindest and most Spiritual people I have even known in my life.



Thats civilized man. Everythings back assward in syphilization.