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Kevin
08-28-2006, 01:42 PM
This was a rather large spider on top of Armstrong Mt. Maybe 1.5 inches long. Very aggressive, was coming at us. Eventually left the bare rock for the woods. Very quick too.

http://www.the-boogiemen.com/hiking/go4Spider.jpg

Boreal Chickadee
08-28-2006, 02:07 PM
Oh him...that's Fur Ree Friend.

Kevin
08-28-2006, 11:16 PM
Wait a sec, I googled that and there's no such spider as a "fur ree friend"! :p

Qby
08-28-2006, 11:36 PM
Hard to say from the image. It might be a wolf spider but it's hard to tell without seeing the eyes.

Brian

Kevin
08-29-2006, 07:19 AM
It might be a wolf spider but it's hard to tell without seeing the eyes.

You got it! I verified with some pictures on google and it's definitely a wolf spider with some color adaptations.

Thanks Brian!

Hobbitling
08-29-2006, 09:16 AM
how big is that? its hard to tell from the picture.

Boreal Chickadee
08-29-2006, 09:19 AM
Oddly, when I first saw the picture I thought Wolf but was too lazy to look it up. Now the reason I had some knowledge of the name was because many years ago (around thirty before internet photos etc) I was bitten by a spider on my hand (I was tying to photograph a limestone grike and was moving some vergetation). Ouch! First my hand broke out in raised white dots in somewhat of a line and then the fun began. I was trying to drive and lost strength in my hands and arms, not being able to turn the wheel properly on a curve. I quit driving, trading places thinking that I just wasn't feeling well. And then I started to slump over. By the time we got to the emergency room I couldn't move my arms or legs, couldn't walk, was having trouble breathing, temperature had dropped almost three degrees....That darned spider had poisoned me, affected my central nervous sytem and sent me into shock. A zoologist theorized it was either a brown recluse or a pregnant wolf spider. I was told when a spider is pregnant it can build up poisons in its body for defense. ...The worst side effect was that I was pretrified of spiders for several years.

So Fur Ree Friend, we finally meet.

Kevin
08-29-2006, 12:24 PM
So Fur Ree Friend, we finally meet.

Wow, that's a hell of an experience! :eek:

The one on Armstrong appeared aggressive and fearless, which prompted me to look into it. You don't usually associate Wolf Spiders with poison (or so I read), but apparently there's exceptions. How do you tell if a spider's pregant? :boozing:

Boreal Chickadee
08-29-2006, 12:34 PM
How do you tell if a spider's pregant? :boozing:

She's b**chy and bites :evil:

Sounds like a bad joke. :gripe:

I don't know if the zoologist's informtion has stood the test of time but that's what he told me. He was highly respected. Has since passed away. But building up internal chemical defenses is common to both plants and animals as a means of survival.

Qby
08-29-2006, 01:24 PM
I'd go out on a line and guess that the spider that bit you was more likely to be a black widow. They're the most common poisonous spider in the US and can be found as far north as the Adirondacks (or even into Canada), although they are more common farther south. The Brown Recluse is seldom anywhere near the northern US.

Also, the symptoms you describe are much more consistent with the bite of a black widow, which causes systemic problems (i.e., trouble breathing) than with the bite of a Brown Recluse. It's bite usually causes more localized damage and tissue death near the site of the bite.

It's not likely that a wolf spider bite would cause those symptoms but a bite from a jumping spider might, especially if you were allergic. But my money is on a black widow.

Brian

Kevin
08-29-2006, 01:54 PM
how big is that? its hard to tell from the picture.

1 - 2" long, the body maybe 1/2 - 3/4" of that

Hobbitling
08-29-2006, 02:03 PM
by the way kevin, what kind of spider is your avatar?

Qby
08-29-2006, 08:22 PM
One of the best ways to identify a spider is to start with the web and then look at the eyes. We can't see the Web for his avatar but we can see the eyes. The four large eyes (with the two in the middle larger than the other two) almost certainly make it a form of jumping spider.

If I had to guess, I'd think it was one of the habronattus species:

http://k47.pbase.com/u20/tmurray74/upload/32995859.CRW_4560_RJ.JPG

Brian

Kevin
08-31-2006, 04:21 PM
Brian, another correct answer! But I'm out of gold stars, will 2 silver do? :rolling: It's indeed a jumping spider, who blended perfectly with the bare rock he was on.

Here's the thread from that ID:

http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=3799

DeanA
08-31-2006, 11:23 PM
Wow. Does this make you rethink sleeping outside without a tent?

Actually, come to think of it, how come people are often told to get rabies shots when they have a bat in their house that "could" have bitten them at night while sleeping, but people sleeping outside aren't told the same thing?

I remember being stung by a Scorpion (presumably) while in my bedroom - in Georgia! If I hadn't seen and heard one the day before, I wouldn't have believed it.

I will say - the insects down south (particularly Florida) are the strangest things I've ever seen.

looncry
04-24-2010, 06:04 PM
Wow. Does this make you rethink sleeping outside without a tent?

Actually, come to think of it, how come people are often told to get rabies shots when they have a bat in their house that "could" have bitten them at night while sleeping, but people sleeping outside aren't told the same thing?

I remember being stung by a Scorpion (presumably) while in my bedroom - in Georgia! If I hadn't seen and heard one the day before, I wouldn't have believed it.

I will say - the insects down south (particularly Florida) are the strangest things I've ever seen.

We need more dragonflies to swallow the bugs! :) Looncry

pkrchrds
04-25-2010, 12:13 PM
I lived on a wildlife refuge off the coast of Georgia for five years back in the eighties. I learned to appreciate the spiders in the 100 year old cottage I lived in. They trapped gnats, flies and mosquitos and kept them off the porch. Black widows and scorpions were a different story. You learned not to reach in anywhere you couldn't see.

Rick
04-25-2010, 03:11 PM
I lived on a wildlife refuge off the coast of Georgia for five years back in the eighties. I learned to appreciate the spiders in the 100 year old cottage I lived in. They trapped gnats, flies and mosquitos and kept them off the porch. Black widows and scorpions were a different story. You learned not to reach in anywhere you couldn't see.
I was stationed at Hunter Army Airfield in georgia in the 70's. I remember those godawful huge yellow~orange~red spiders hanging from huge webs in the trees. They were easily as big or bigger than your hand.