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View Full Version : Famous high peaks bear yellow yellow shot in Jay


adkman12986
11-10-2012, 12:26 PM
http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com/page/content.detail/id/533958/Famous-bear-bandit-is-killed.html?nav=5008

ADKeagle
11-10-2012, 05:17 PM
Interesting! Thanks for the link.

geogymn
11-10-2012, 06:54 PM
Another unique character lost!

SummitHat
11-10-2012, 09:12 PM
Yellow Yellow was a clever creature whose resourcefulness made her a legend. Her exploits led to many great stories and presumably more than a few tall tales. She did a great deal to further the education of the camping community regarding the securing of food in the outdoors. Seeing the precision with which she opened a Bear Vault was unforgettable. One cannot help but admire such skill.

Death is inevitable. Nevertheless, I think it's a damned shame that a high peaks icon came to an end this way.

vtflyfish
11-11-2012, 06:44 AM
Yellow Yellow was a clever creature whose resourcefulness made her a legend. Her exploits led to many great stories and presumably more than a few tall tales. She did a great deal to further the education of the camping community regarding the securing of food in the outdoors. Seeing the precision with which she opened a Bear Vault was unforgettable. One cannot help but admire such skill.

Death is inevitable. Nevertheless, I think it's a damned shame that a high peaks icon came to an end this way.

I second that!!!:thumbs: Well said.

wellsley
11-11-2012, 08:46 AM
She had also reportedly gotten more aggressive with hikers and campers, something she was not known for in the past, Winchell said.

Sounds like it was her time to go. No mention if she had cubs. I would rather a hunter take it legally. And get to use the meat and fur than to have it die a slow painful death. Or have it get very aggressive and have the rangers dispatch it. Because us humans encroached on its space.

Justin
11-11-2012, 10:29 AM
Congrats to the hunter.

teclo
11-11-2012, 02:50 PM
Wow, and mysteriously she had no tags on. Those things just come right off now I guess. Yeah, congrats to the hunter. Must have been tough to find her.

Justin
11-11-2012, 03:28 PM
Wow, and mysteriously she had no tags on. Those things just come right off now I guess. Yeah, congrats to the hunter. Must have been tough to find her.

If she was intelligent enough to figure out how to open bear resistant canisters, perhaps she figured out a way to remove the tags from her ears also, but not the radio collar which was still on her.

She was shot in the town of Jay after roughly 20 years of evading hunters and out-smarting humans... yes absolutely, congratulations to the hunter.

Alpine1
11-11-2012, 07:41 PM
She was shot in the town of Jay after roughly 20 years of evading hunters and out-smarting humans... yes absolutely, congratulations to the hunter.

:thumbs::thumbs:

ADKeagle
11-11-2012, 09:21 PM
Wow, and mysteriously she had no tags on. Those things just come right off now I guess. Yeah, congrats to the hunter. Must have been tough to find her.

http://www.adkhighpeaks.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19002

Browse this thread, it appears that she may have lost a tag or two before the daylight pack stealing event.

pllckjsnm
11-11-2012, 10:02 PM
:thumbs::thumbs:

Congrats are definitely in order. This was no dumb yogi bear wandering through the woods. Bear don't get that old with that much hunting pressure around by being ignorant.

geogymn
11-12-2012, 06:55 AM
Is it illegal or unethical to shoot a tagged animal?

WinterWarlock
11-12-2012, 07:07 AM
Is it illegal or unethical to shoot a tagged animal?

I don't think so, and it sounds like she didn't have much left of her tags anyway, so they would have been hard to see.

adkman12986
11-12-2012, 07:43 AM
Is it illegal or unethical to shoot a tagged animal?

No it is not illeagle to shoot a tagged animal. DEC tags animals to track and document certain things about it. They tag fish geese and a host of others.

viewseeker
11-12-2012, 12:31 PM
any word on weight of this 20yr old Icon?? place taking?

predator
11-12-2012, 12:32 PM
I got a picture of yellow/yellow in Sept of 08, between South Meadow and Marcy Dam. I had a game camera in the area. Sent the pic to DEC, because of the coller, and they responded, saying it was yellow/yellow.
After getting her picture taken, yellow/yellow proceeded to chew my camera up.

Holdstrong
11-12-2012, 01:50 PM
Yellow-Yellow wasn't intentionally "eluding" hunters. She was very habituated to humans, and likely thought of this hunter as no more of a danger to her than the hikers she regularly visited.

This was a bear that would come up to you in camp, and you could "shoo" her away.

There are two things that have protected her over the years. First, she kept to an area that is not often hunted, and second her two yellow tags are rather famous and most hunters would likely pass on her. At least, every hunter I personally know would certainly not intentionally kill her.

Unfortunately for Yellow-Yellow, both of those protections were gone. A dry season combined with bear canisters forced her to roam for food, and she lost both of her ear tags.

mspaci
11-12-2012, 02:45 PM
there is nothing in dec regs that states you cant shoot a tagged animal

1894
11-12-2012, 04:09 PM
Congrats to the hunter. :thumbs:
Sure was a legendary bear , but it must have been her time .
I'm guessing that over 20 years she has had more than a few cubs and she lives on through them .

geogymn
11-12-2012, 05:21 PM
Thanks for the replies. Now that we have discerned the legality of shooting a tagged animal how about the ethical question? Would the DEC want you to shoot a tagged animal in the normal course of hunting in order to achieve more accurate records? Or simply, am I helping or hurting by shooting a tagged animal? By the way, I never saw tagged game.

Woods Elf
11-12-2012, 05:47 PM
:gripe:If she was intelligent enough to figure out how to open bear resistant canisters, perhaps she figured out a way to remove the tags from her ears also, but not the radio collar which was still on her.

She was shot in the town of Jay after roughly 20 years of evading hunters and out-smarting humans... yes absolutely, congratulations to the hunter.

I disagree Justin. We are in her domain. She was doing what comes naturally, forage for food. She was obviously a very resourceful and clever bear. It does not matter that her tags were gone, how does one not see the radio collar?? If the DEC felt she was a danger they would have killed her long ago...

yellowcanoe
11-12-2012, 06:10 PM
In some ways I feel a living experiment has been lost and a valuable source of information on bear behavior.


Yet she was not smart enough to evade a bear hunter. Bear hunting is not all that easy from what I have been told by bear hunting friends (I do not know how to hunt)

Justin
11-12-2012, 06:20 PM
:gripe:

I disagree Justin. We are in her domain. She was doing what comes naturally, forage for food. She was obviously a very resourceful and clever bear. It does not matter that her tags were gone, how does one not see the radio collar?? If the DEC felt she was a danger they would have killed her long ago...

No problem.
Didn't mean to offend anyone with my remarks.
Poor Yellow Yellow.
Shame on all you big game hunters....
How dare you?!?!

1894
11-12-2012, 08:34 PM
:gripe:

I disagree Justin. We are in her domain. She was doing what comes naturally, forage for food. She was obviously a very resourceful and clever bear. It does not matter that her tags were gone, how does one not see the radio collar?? If the DEC felt she was a danger they would have killed her long ago...

I disagree Elf . She was also in the domain of hunters. There are hunting seasons and , well , that is what hunters do . Didn't know that game had to be a "danger" before a hunter could shoot it.
Maybe you would like to put better labels on critters so us hunters , trappers , fishermen , waterfowlers only take the " dangerous " ones ???

yellowcanoe
11-12-2012, 08:54 PM
Maybe we best let her to rest.

There are two communities at battle here: one hunt, presumably for food, and the other kill only if the animal is a danger.

Hunting for food is a long tradition and still valid. Not everyone has access to a supermarket nor can afford it.

Again I am torn...

chaser
11-12-2012, 09:32 PM
:gripe:

I disagree Justin. We are in her domain. She was doing what comes naturally, forage for food. She was obviously a very resourceful and clever bear. It does not matter that her tags were gone, how does one not see the radio collar?? If the DEC felt she was a danger they would have killed her long ago...


What makes one bear more important than another? Just because DEC collared her and the NY Times wrote an article she should be exempt from hunting? I guess I don't understand that thinking. Oh well, here we go again.....:Peek:

WinterWarlock
11-12-2012, 09:40 PM
We're starting to get to a point where folks are pushing each other's buttons....unintentionally, I'm sure. But these topics often stray off course...it's ok to disagree. It's not ok to be disagreeable. Thanks.

1894
11-12-2012, 09:56 PM
We're starting to get to a point where folks are pushing each other's buttons....unintentionally, I'm sure. But these topics often stray off course...it's ok to disagree. It's not ok to be disagreeable. Thanks.

After how many years have I seen a sticky at the top of this section of the forum , something to the effect of ( this is a hunting and fishing section and those that do not like those things need not reply here if you want to stir the pot )
Now I see it is no longer there so I'll back off now. Disappointed that history has repeated itself here in just a few short years. :banghead:

chaser
11-12-2012, 10:02 PM
No problem.
Didn't mean to offend anyone with my remarks.
Poor Yellow Yellow.
Shame on all you big game hunters....
How dare you?!?!

Me too

WinterWarlock
11-12-2012, 10:05 PM
After how many years have I seen a sticky at the top of this section of the forum , something to the effect of ( this is a hunting and fishing section and those that do not like those things need not reply here if you want to stir the pot )
Now I see it is no longer there so I'll back off now. Disappointed that history has repeated itself here in just a few short years. :banghead:

I don't remember that sticky, but yes, this is the hunting section. I agree there is a wider public interest in Yellow Yellow, but the fact is she was hunted, and done so legally...and this is not the place to debate that.

timberghost
11-12-2012, 10:38 PM
Congratulations to the hunter! (not every hunter is successful in any given season)

What's done is done, another chapter of ADK history.
Although, maybe the Wild center or ADK museum will get in touch with the hunter and work something out for an educational/historic exhibit about bear-human interactions/coexistence in the park..

Slightly off topic, but what is an average life expectancy for a black bear sow in the 'Dacks?

Blackhawk
11-12-2012, 10:49 PM
After many seasons of big game hunting the Adirondacks, Catskills and the Hudson Valley with family and friends - many friends along the way had never encountered a bear, coyote, coywolf, bobcat etc. while hunting. And for some of them - even if they had the opportunity to take a bear they wouldn't.
I'd be interested in any of the stats from the bear - e.g., the live weight, condition of teeth, overall health condition, coat, recent consumption, evidence of being shot before, was the collar still transmitting etc. if anyone sees a report please post.
Thanks,

geogymn
11-13-2012, 06:43 AM
Congratulations to the hunter! (not every hunter is successful in any given season)

What's done is done, another chapter of ADK history.
Although, maybe the Wild center or ADK museum will get in touch with the hunter and work something out for an educational/historic exhibit about bear-human interactions/coexistence in the park..

Slightly off topic, but what is an average life expectancy for a black bear sow in the 'Dacks?

That's an excellent idea!!

adkman12986
11-13-2012, 07:15 AM
Didn't mean to open a can of worms here if it was ethical or not and if it was leagle or not. Just put this out as informational. My thoughts are

1 hunters have the right to shoot any game in season as long as they have tags for it.

2 Everyones ethics differ from one anothers. What I feel is right may not be what you think is right. Each has their own opinion, and that just what it is an opinion.

3 Personally I would much rather see someone harvest the bear before she had to be put down by DEC. At least this way she will be used instead of burried in a dump somewhere.

Holdstrong
11-13-2012, 10:17 AM
Yet she was not smart enough to evade a bear hunter. Bear hunting is not all that easy from what I have been told by bear hunting friends (I do not know how to hunt)

This was a very habituated animal. One that had 20 years of safe interactions with humans and did not see them as a danger.

If someone wanted to kill Yellow-Yellow, they could have done so on any given evening by hiking up to the high peaks and having a late dinner. I imagine if this hunter didn't shoot her, she would have walked up to him/her and tried to take his/her sandwich.

WinterWarlock
11-13-2012, 10:28 AM
This was a very habituated animal. One that had 20 years of safe interactions with humans and did not see them as a danger.

If someone wanted to kill Yellow-Yellow, they could have done so on any given evening by hiking up to the high peaks and having a late dinner. I imagine if this hunter didn't shoot her, she would have walked up to him/her and tried to take his/her sandwich.

Actually there were a few stories in early summer about her, and her 'increasing aggressiveness', so given the other stories about reduced food this year for bears, perhaps she was no longer as 'tame' as she once was.

Holdstrong
11-13-2012, 11:58 AM
Actually there were a few stories in early summer about her, and her 'increasing aggressiveness', so given the other stories about reduced food this year for bears, perhaps she was no longer as 'tame' as she once was.

Yeah, I've heard the same. And recent news reports about this all mention "increased aggressiveness" as well. It is a bit misleading. I think most people read that and assume it means she was becoming more aggressive toward people. But from my talks with folks familiar with her, that is not the case. What that is referring to is an increase in the frequency and the 'boldness' of her interactions - not actual aggressive or threatening behavior.

There was a good video of her this summer trying to make off with a backpack from a camp full of people. I've heard this cited as an example of her increased aggression. But that video is great because while it shows that she is being more "bold" about getting the backpack, it also clearly shows that she has no "aggression" toward the campers - one of which was no more than 6 feet from her, following her around with a camera!

That video is in line with all of the stories I've heard about her from this summer. It seems like she was more active than usual, but no more threatening than usual.

At any rate, Yellow-Yellow was never tame (or domesticated), she was habituated. There is an important difference between the two. All that means is that she was used to being around humans and did not think of them as a threat... hunters included.

ADKeagle
11-13-2012, 12:44 PM
Yeah, I've heard the same. And recent news reports about this all mention "increased aggressiveness" as well. It is a bit misleading. I think most people read that and assume it means she was becoming more aggressive toward people. But from my talks with folks familiar with her, that is not the case. What that is referring to is an increase in the frequency and the 'boldness' of her interactions - not actual aggressive or threatening behavior.

There was a good video of her this summer trying to make off with a backpack from a camp full of people. I've heard this cited as an example of her increased aggression. But that video is great because while it shows that she is being more "bold" about getting the backpack, it also clearly shows that she has no "aggression" toward the campers - one of which was no more than 6 feet from her, following her around with a camera!

That video is in line with all of the stories I've heard about her from this summer. It seems like she was more active than usual, but no more threatening than usual.

At any rate, Yellow-Yellow was never tame (or domesticated), she was habituated. There is an important difference between the two. All that means is that she was used to being around humans and did not think of them as a threat... hunters included.

Increasing boldness IS increasing aggression. Approaching noisy humans during daylight is increasing aggression. We want our wildlife, especially the ones with big teeth, to view humans as a threat.

Holdstrong
11-13-2012, 02:28 PM
Increasing boldness IS increasing aggression. Approaching noisy humans during daylight is increasing aggression. We want our wildlife, especially the ones with big teeth, to view humans as a threat.

Aggression typically refers to hostile or attacking behavior.

Boldness implies an increased level of habituation.

Yellow-Yellow exhibited the latter, not the former. And there is no research, that I am aware of, that shows the latter leads to the former (most research seems to show just the opposite, actually)

rdl
11-13-2012, 05:27 PM
We want our wildlife, especially the ones with big teeth, to view humans as a threat.

Or perhaps just part of the food chain ???

Justin
11-13-2012, 08:10 PM
Just curious...
Are the colored ear tags used solely for identification purposes, or something else?
Are there other bears out there with colored ear tags in the Adirondacks?
Say for instance, is Red-Red bear out there somewhere?
Or was this just something exclusive for the Yellow Yellow bear?

wellsley
11-13-2012, 08:42 PM
I've seen several bears with blue tags with numbers in there ears.

adkh20
11-13-2012, 08:55 PM
Are the colored ear tags used solely for identification purposes, or something else?
Are there other bears out there with colored ear tags in the Adirondacks?
Say for instance, is Red-Red bear out there somewhere?
Or was this just something exclusive for the Yellow Yellow bear?

Here's a story from a few years ago in the Adirondack Explorer:

http://www.adirondackexplorer.org/stories/bears.php

Justin
11-13-2012, 09:39 PM
Thanks guys.

chairrock
11-14-2012, 10:45 AM
A little thread drift, some loons are tagged with leg tags of different colors for ID for research. When we helped with the loons on Cranberry Lake the technician was able to identify individual loons by looking at the colored tags, my eyes were not good enough tho.

ADKeagle
11-14-2012, 01:07 PM
Or perhaps just part of the food chain ???

Yep, we are part of the food chain. Wildlife becoming habituated and challenging humans is the beginning of a potential reversal in the food chain if they realize they have nothing to fear. Fear is healthy and essential to keep humans on top!

vtflyfish
11-14-2012, 02:31 PM
Just curious...
Are the colored ear tags used solely for identification purposes, or something else?
Are there other bears out there with colored ear tags in the Adirondacks?
Say for instance, is Red-Red bear out there somewhere?
Or was this just something exclusive for the Yellow Yellow bear?

I've heard of BAR code before. Now there's BEAR code?:rolling:

wellsley
11-14-2012, 05:02 PM
A little thread drift, some loons are tagged with leg tags of different colors for ID for research. When we helped with the loons on Cranberry Lake the technician was able to identify individual loons by looking at the colored tags, my eyes were not good enough tho.

Many years ago I spotted a vulture with a large circle tag on one wing. Called DEC and reported my sighting. They took my name and address and a couple months later got a letter from the Florida DNR telling me when and where it was tagged.

ehsfishin72
11-15-2012, 04:58 AM
I shot a tagged Turkey last yr. It was from a Penn St. relocation program when I called the # in, I received a $100 reward for reporting.

dmartenvt
11-16-2012, 06:36 PM
I had read (on another thread) that she had three cubs this year. I had cub(s) on their own go through my property, quite close-by, about the same time. If anyone hunting or hiking in the area comes across her cubs or their tracks, feel free to contact me by messaging me on here. I can get in contact with the appropriate/legal re-habbers to see what can be done to get her cubs through the winter.

turtles11756@yahoo.c
11-23-2012, 10:13 AM
many years ago (40) while deer hunting before dawn while heading up a mountain near diamond point my friend and i crossed paths with a small bear. till this day i am happy i never got my marlin 336 even up before that bear ran off

WinterWarlock
01-23-2013, 02:11 PM
Is it illegal or unethical to shoot a tagged animal?

I found an article today that reminded me of your question...thought I'd share it with you (and everyone).

http://blog.gaiam.com/blog/should-radio-collared-animals-be-legally-protected/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=fbblog

1894
01-24-2013, 01:54 AM
Interesting , so if it is unethical to shoot a collared or tagged critter that is not wearing a blaze orange vest that says "don't shoot me " Do you leave the collar or tags where the critter , bird , or fish was taken ? Turn them into the DEC ?

geogymn
01-24-2013, 07:51 AM
Thanks for the link. The article refers to collared animals which I wouldn't shoot but a tagged animal might be more valuable to science if it reported. Any reseachers please correct me if I am mistaken.

DSettahr
01-24-2013, 08:31 AM
From a scientific stand point, the idea that collared animals should be spared is somewhat absurd. The best thing to do would be to treat the animal as you would if it weren't collared. Hunting is very much a part of the environment in which these animals live in, and any properly conducted scientific study would acknowledge this. If you choose to spare an animal on the sole basis that it has a collar, you're doing a much greater disservice to the scientific community, because then you've altered the conditions of the experiment- and then you're really wasting research funds, because the data being collected has been skewed by your actions.

A close friend of mine from college is a wildlife biologist who works with radio collared animals, and I'm pretty sure she harbors no false perceptions about the realities of hunting and the possible effects on her work. I'll ask her what she thinks.

WinterWarlock
01-24-2013, 08:41 AM
If you choose to spare an animal on the sole basis that it has a collar, you're doing a much greater disservice to the scientific community, because then you've altered the conditions of the experiment-
.

As someone who works in the scientific research field, I thought the same thing...it essentially changes one from being an observer to being a participant, and the conclusions may well be affected.

redhawk
01-24-2013, 10:06 AM
From a scientific stand point, the idea that collared animals should be spared is somewhat absurd. The best thing to do would be to treat the animal as you would if it weren't collared. Hunting is very much a part of the environment in which these animals live in, and any properly conducted scientific study would acknowledge this. If you choose to spare an animal on the sole basis that it has a collar, you're doing a much greater disservice to the scientific community, because then you've altered the conditions of the experiment- and then you're really wasting research funds, because the data being collected has been skewed by your actions.

A close friend of mine from college is a wildlife biologist who works with radio collared animals, and I'm pretty sure she harbors no false perceptions about the realities of hunting and the possible effects on her work. I'll ask her what she thinks.

The whole idea is to "observe" not affect the fate of any of the subjects. So, if a collared animal were to get and special treatment, then the moment the collar goes on, the results get changed.

On another note, aren't some studies more "situational" then others? For instance in the Adirondacks, specially bears in the high traffic area, aren't mny of them collared because of their interactions with humans? Therefore taking one of those collared bears out might be a different story.

As for legends, I remember when my brother and I checked in with a ranger in Glacier National Park several years ago. When he learned I lived in he Adirondacks at that time he asked if I had ever seen Yellow-Yellow!

As someone who works in the scientific research field, I thought the same thing...it essentially changes one from being an observer to being a participant, and the conclusions may well be affected.

geogymn
01-24-2013, 12:50 PM
I guess I assumed maybe someone was studing the animal's movements or migrations. I would hate to disrupt such a study ( I imagine a lot of time , energy, and money was spent on that collar). I do my share of participating, just didn't want to infringe on those who rather observe.

DSettahr
01-24-2013, 07:40 PM
I guess I assumed maybe someone was studing the animal's movements or migrations. I would hate to disrupt such a study ( I imagine a lot of time , energy, and money was spent on that collar). I do my share of participating, just didn't want to infringe on those who rather observe.

But that's just it- even in a study of migrations you are still interfering if you don't shoot the animal simply because it's collared. If the animal weren't collared, it wouldn't have migrated- it would have been shot and killed. This is still valuable information for scientists to have, even in a study that is seemingly unrelated to hunting and the effects of hunting on animal behavior.

Science isn't about getting the results you want, it's about getting results that are accurate... even if it means spending lots of money and only getting a small sample of results in return. Fewer, more accurate results are generally worth more to researchers than a larger sample of less accurate results is.

From a purely scientific standpoint (I'm not talking about moral ethics here), refusing to take an animal because it's collared is just as bad as purposefully targeting animals because they are collared. In both cases, you're modifying the conditions in which the experiment is taking place, and that could skew the results.

It's worth pointing out too that it's impossible to create a scientific study of wildlife in which there is a 100% guarantee that you aren't modifying the behavior of the animals in question in some way. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle pretty much dictates that it's impossible to study something without it changing in response to your observations in some way. But that doesn't mean that you can't plan a research project so as to significantly reduce the effects of observation on the subjects of your research to the point that you can (hopefully) rule out the effects of any outside influences.

geogymn
01-25-2013, 08:41 AM
But that's just it- even in a study of migrations you are still interfering if you don't shoot the animal simply because it's collared. If the animal weren't collared, it wouldn't have migrated- it would have been shot and killed. This is still valuable information for scientists to have, even in a study that is seemingly unrelated to hunting and the effects of hunting on animal behavior.

Science isn't about getting the results you want, it's about getting results that are accurate... even if it means spending lots of money and only getting a small sample of results in return. Fewer, more accurate results are generally worth more to researchers than a larger sample of less accurate results is.

From a purely scientific standpoint (I'm not talking about moral ethics here), refusing to take an animal because it's collared is just as bad as purposefully targeting animals because they are collared. In both cases, you're modifying the conditions in which the experiment is taking place, and that could skew the results.

It's worth pointing out too that it's impossible to create a scientific study of wildlife in which there is a 100% guarantee that you aren't modifying the behavior of the animals in question in some way. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle pretty much dictates that it's impossible to study something without it changing in response to your observations in some way. But that doesn't mean that you can't plan a research project so as to significantly reduce the effects of observation on the subjects of your research to the point that you can (hopefully) rule out the effects of any outside influences.

I am going to have to respectively disagree to wit:

"But for Yellowstone scientists, the loss of the collared wolves isn’t so much a political or an emotional issue, as an issue of the viability of wildlife science.

They are particularly frustrated at the elimination of five wolves outfitted with tracking collars that had spent the majority of their time inside the park border, as well as two others that roamed had through the park though spent much of their time outside.

“Does it hurt our research? Yes, very much so,” said Douglas W. Smith, senior wildlife biologist for Yellowstone. “It’s a huge blow logistically and scientifically.”

The rest of the article here;

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/28/research-animals-lost-in-wolf-hunts-near-yellowstone/

DSettahr
01-25-2013, 09:44 AM
It's a little disappointing that people involved in scientific research would publicly express that viewpoint. Wildlife science isn't as "exact" a science as say, physics, though, so it's understandable that they might place a higher priority on more results, even if the accuracy of those results can be called into question. It's possible too that the main reason the wolves are collared isn't so much a scientific study that is being undertaken, as it is simply tracking the wolves and their whereabouts for management purposes.

That article is also pretty heavy on emotion and is obviously not at all free of any bias. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with that- I do believe that emotions can and should play a role in how we manage wildlife. But from a strictly scientific standpoint, I stand by my argument- collared animals should be treated no better or worse by hunters, so as to maintain the integrity of the information collected.

DSettahr
03-03-2013, 10:49 PM
Here is what my wildlife biologist friend had to say on the subject of collared animals and hunting:

Hunters and trappers are an invaluable resource to big game and furbearer management. Much of the state's knowledge of American marten and fisher is dependent on information gained from licensed trappers in their log books. Anyone that wishes to trap marten/fisher must keep a detailed harvest journal provided by NYSDEC of trap locations (dot on a map), numbers of traps set, length of time set, sex and number of animals caught, etc. to better understand they're habitat selection and requirements for management purposes. Trappers can keep the pelts but they must have them sealed by DEC (looks like a zip-tie, part of the CITES regulation for international trade of endangered species) before they can be sold at fur auctions. The carcasses have to be submitted back to the state. We take tissue for DNA analysis, the stomach for diet analysis, a tooth for aging, and reproductive organs in case someone ever wants to do a study with them. The radio-collars we use have the animal's frequency and a phone number to report. There's a $25 reward for reporting a radio-collared marten/fisher.

I would encourage anyone that shoots/traps a marked animal to report it, because that's how A LOT of information gets collected. As you said before, preferential treatment could skew necessary data a study is looking to collect on home range, trap success, or whatever. Sometimes a hunter or trapper can't tell if an animal is tagged before they take it. For example Yellow Yellow, the famous High Peaks bear, was shot by a hunter in Jay, NY this past fall. Both her yellow ear tags had fallen out. She just looked like any other bear ambling through the woods when he shot her. Bear, deer and turkey must be reported anyway, but had he not specifically called to let the Bureau of Wildlife know that he got a collared bear, we'd be left to speculate where she went or how she died. That information can be pieced together with what the radio-collar data demonstrated about her movement patterns in the Fall. Yellow Yellow used to leave the High Peaks after the campers left, travel north to a cherry stand, fatten up for the winter before returning to den on Algonquin.

I realize that I talked more about the importance of reporting than I did about hunting/trapping animals with tags and collars. For the most part people can't tell if an animal is marked. Trappers can't set traps differently to not catch a collared animal. Duck and goose hunters can't tell if a duck/goose has a leg band before it's shot.

rickhart
03-04-2013, 10:49 AM
Thanks for sharing the wildlife biologist's message! Not only is it interesting getting details on how the hunter/trapper data is gathered & used, but the following bit of information was fun to know about Yellow-yellow in particular:
"Yellow Yellow used to leave the High Peaks after the campers left, travel north to a cherry stand, fatten up for the winter before returning to den on Algonquin."
A little window into one creature's life...