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redhawk
12-02-2004, 09:43 AM
After seeing the tidbits posted here and there about the "hows" and Whys", and the lcharacters that were nvolved. I thouht it might be a good idea to have a section here for just history and folklore of the dacks.

How some of the peaks were named, whe were the people involved, how certain things got named, who discovered what.

Seems to me it's a natural for this forum.

lumberzac
12-02-2004, 09:47 AM
Maybe as a trial basis to see how it works out. I’m not sure there would be a lot of threads in that section. I defiantly think there should be at least a thread on the subject.

sacco
12-02-2004, 09:57 AM
all the trivia and quiz game stuff could go in there. i think it'd get some use

lumberzac
12-02-2004, 10:01 AM
all the trivia and quiz game stuff could go in there. i think it'd get some use

That's a good point sacco. I didn't even think of those.




:dance: WOO HOO! My 500th post. :dance:

Kevin
12-02-2004, 10:04 AM
spell and grammar check is your friend ;)

Kevin
12-02-2004, 10:05 AM
:dance: WOO HOO! My 500th post. :dance:
You roxxor!

Mavs00
12-02-2004, 10:16 AM
Not that it matter's much, but I think that it a good idea.

You could make Dick the moderator, he's obviously well read and has a wealth of knowledge, plus and his passion for the historical aspect is pretty apparentf, don't you think. :thumbs:

Neil
12-02-2004, 10:58 AM
Beat me to it Redhawk and Mavs, both on the forum and its moderator. Great minds think alike! It could be a grab bag of history, anecdotes, books and reading lists, questions about how such and such got its name, mystery pics, quizzes like Percious' latest and whatever. Anything the moderator deems as to OT he moves to RGC. I bet we could bring some real museum/history professional on board for say a monthly op-ed or something.
Hey Dick! Will we be writing a page of history with the Skating Party? It intertwines the internet and it's rôle in the social development of recreation in the ADKs.

BTW, I heard about a new book coming out, Women with Altitude written by a group of female winter 46ers. There's supposed to be a lot of publicity when it goes to market with book signings and all that. I'd like to see a signing organized right on the top of Esther.

Kevin
12-02-2004, 11:04 AM
My only gripe is that once you establish the "facts", there isn't really much to discuss. New stories or links, but for discussion it's going to get a little dry. Since this already falls under an existing couple topics, and because those topics are not currently overflowing with new threads, I don't personally see a need for separation. I'm of a mind that creating too many sub topics will confuse things for casual visitors and new members. If it were possible, I'd have 3 sections total -- The ADKs, other places, and general chat. Necessity has created the other forums. In time most forums do need to be micro-managed. The computing forum I'm involved with has like 50 sub forums out of necessity. So my contention is that I don't think there's a necessity. This may be getting 'too fine'.

But I've been wrong, didn't think the separate hunting/fishing area would work but that's doing just fine.

I know redhawk has probably considered this for a little while and I trust his judgement. Dick is definitely moderator material for such a section/topic.

Neil
12-02-2004, 11:34 AM
Kevin, Redhawk wanted a sub-forum on the quality of the various privies in the Adirondacks!
Hawk, why don't you start a thread on that. Something like: What's the smelliest, most disgusting privie you know of?

Kevin
12-02-2004, 12:04 PM
Kevin, Redhawk wanted a sub-forum on the quality of the various privies in the Adirondacks!
Hawk, why don't you start a thread on that. Something like: What's the smelliest, most disgusting privie you know of?lol

That one wouldn't fly, but I'm basically calling this one "a go". Waiting on Redhawk to return from his walk to provide the details needed to get this up.

sacco
12-02-2004, 12:04 PM
kev, why not just give the poll a few days and see what people think?

Kevin
12-02-2004, 12:20 PM
kev, why not just give the poll a few days and see what people think?I've learned with forum polls that early trends 85% in favor don't usually change enough over time. :p

While I objected I go with the majority vote most of the time. Just wanted to state why I thought it may fail and nothing more. It's certainly not a "bad" idea and I see its usefulness, so no harm done with trying it out. If it goes unused it can always be closed and the threads moved back to their respective sections.

Dick
12-02-2004, 01:03 PM
Kevin, Redhawk wanted a sub-forum on the quality of the various privies in the Adirondacks!
Hawk, why don't you start a thread on that. Something like: What's the smelliest, most disgusting privie you know of?

That's an easy one!

Skyclimber
12-02-2004, 01:06 PM
Actually the History of the Adirondacks is rather interesting indeed. Like the story of President Roosevelt finding out he was the new President, while he was ascending Mt. Marcy and descended by way of Lake Tear to return to claim his Presidentary.

Dick
12-02-2004, 01:51 PM
Actually the History of the Adirondacks is rather interesting indeed. Like the story of President Roosevelt finding out he was the new President, while he was ascending Mt. Marcy and descended by way of Lake Tear to return to claim his Presidentary.

Roosevelt knew of the assassination before his vacation trip, and had visited McKinley in Buffalo, but the doctor thought McKinley was rallying. Roosevelt joined his vacationing family in the Adirondacks. A messenger brought news only that McKinley had taken a turn for the worse, and that he should return to Buffalo. Upon Roosevelt's arrival at the train station in North Creek, he learned that McKinley had died. The old station house is now a museum. Roosevelt was sworn in upon his return to Buffalo. The trip from the mountains to North Creek was apparently a very rough one.

Kevin
12-02-2004, 01:55 PM
Actually the History of the Adirondacks is rather interesting indeed. Like the story of President Roosevelt finding out he was the new President, while he was ascending Mt. Marcy and descended by way of Lake Tear to return to claim his Presidentary.
Sorry if I made it sound like it wouldn't interesting, but it may not be forum/discussion material. Forums are good for exchanging information and discussion, but static web sites are better for 'knowledge' base documentation. Stating historical fact and story is interesting but it's usually not very good for discussion (unless the origins of the story offer interpretation or come from questionable sources).

Neil
12-02-2004, 02:05 PM
In this case I think the ''history lessons'' would enhance all of our current, active appreciation of the peaks and surounding area. I doubt it would be merely a static repository of facts. Some very interesting history has been made very recently and some is being made right now.

Kevin
12-02-2004, 02:46 PM
In this case I think the ''history lessons'' would enhance all of our current, active appreciation of the peaks and surounding area. I doubt it would be merely a static repository of facts. Some very interesting history has been made very recently and some is being made right now.Whether or not we have a separate section/topic to sort these to doesn't change whether this discussion could take place.

Post away! :)

As I already said, redhawk has the green light and we WILL be havnig this section once I get the details from him and have time this evening to get into the admin console to do it.

Mavs00
12-02-2004, 03:02 PM
Kevin, you're probably right. However, with a little creativity, we could use it to create some fairly stimulating and enlightning topics. For instance, I recently posted this in another thread.

Sorry Neil, as titillating as your description is, Matilda Fielding, which was her real name, was {---EDIT TEXT---}......um, not exactly a looker ;) (at least photos of her ain't incredibly flattering) :). William Nye, In addition to the Hitch up Matilda incident is also known for being one of Abolitionist John Brown's closest friends and he barley declined Brown's invitation to accompany him on his a little jaunt to Harper's Ferry, MD in 1859 :rolleyes: . He was also with Verplank Clovin on the day Colvin determined that Lake Tear drained into the Hudson and not the Ausable, thus discovering the highest source of the Hudson. If that's not enough, he was the primary trailcutter for Henry VanHovenberg and many of the trails leading out from the LOJ were originally cut by him.

Yup, Mr. Nye, much like Mills Blake, got screwed when it came to named peaks in the area. History seems to dictate that he was worth more than having that lowly peak named after him. He never even climbed it, since the first recorded climb of Nye was by the Marshall's and Clark in 1921.

Let say, I started a started a thead with this "in the new section" and also told you that Ole Billy Nye was also credited with another "interesting" factoid in his role as mountain guide. What was it? Being the fact geek (and I mean that in the nicest way :) ) that Neil is, he researches it so that he can answer first (and thus impress us all) and he discovers;

In September 1872, Nye and Verplank Colvin got lost descending Marcy in a storm and "accidently" stumbled onto the summit of Gray Peak, thus becoming the first recorded acsent of this mountain. Not only that, during his "quest for knowledge" he learns that Gray Peak was named for Asa Gray, who was a world renouned botanist from Harvard Universtiy during that period.

Yes, It's boring as hell to some, but in the last 30 seconds (it took to read this), a few people may have learned not only the "Date, circumstances and explorers that reached Gray Peak first, but also how the peak got its name" :).

Granted, you can do this in any forum right now, but for those that I just put to sleep, they can label this section as the "nerd pool" and avoid it like the plague. As with the RGC section (which gets me in trouble every time I enter it :( ), users can choose to selectivly enjoy or not enjoy this aspect of the community.

Just my 2 cents.

Kevin
12-02-2004, 03:30 PM
Granted, you can do this in any forum right now, but for those that I just put to sleep, they can label this section as the "nerd pool" and avoid it like the plague. As with the RGC section (which gets me in trouble every time I enter it :( ), users can choose to selectivly enjoy or not enjoy this aspect of the community.

Just my 2 cents.
I was reading your post thinking [in my worse beavis and Butthead imitation] "words suck words suck words suck..."

So, yeah, maybe giving the "nerd pool" someplace safe to be nerdy aint such a bad thing. :p

Neil
12-02-2004, 03:57 PM
So, yeah, maybe giving the "nerd pool" someplace safe to be nerdy aint such a bad thing. :p
Do you mean like quarantining the infectiously ill?


In September 1872, Nye and Verplank Colvin got lost descending Marcy in a storm and "accidently" stumbled onto the summit of Gray Peak, thus becoming the first recorded acsent of this mountain. Not only that, during his "quest for knowledge" he learns that Gray Peak was named for Asa Gray, who was a world renouned botanist from Harvard Universtiy during that period.

When I did my undergrad degree in, guess what?, Botany, the author of my Plant Taxonomy textbook (you want dry and nerdy, try reading that sucker) was none other that Asa Grey himself. Now isn't that swell?



Being the fact geek (and I mean that in the nicest way :) ) that Neil is, he researches it so that he can answer first (and thus impress us all)


It would be pretty hard to beat Dick at that game!
:)

redhawk
12-02-2004, 04:42 PM
I think it's a win, win situation. Once the bot's and the spiders catalog it, you will get more traffic here based from searches.

Whether it is "static" or interactive, I for one am always thirsty for knowledge. I remember when I first started hiking locally and finding foundations, Mill stones, Grist wheels and even a huge cauldron on top of a mountain here in Hamilton County, I had to go to the library and get books on local history and talk with "old timers" (I'm a youngster here in Wells). It was all very fascinating.

There was a manhunt here in Wells for a man who had murdered someone. He hung in the woods for a couple of years before being caught.

The history of what existed in the valley before they flooded it to create the Great Sacandaga Resevoir, the witch tales!

It just makes the experience of being in the woods, surrounded by communities that no longer exist, walking in the footsteps of people like Paul Smith, Seneca Ray Stoddard, French Louie, It sends shivers up my spine.

I also happen to be a History, Folklore and facts buff. In case no one noticed.

StonerLakeLover
12-03-2004, 09:17 AM
The Spare with a link that hopefully works (http://community.webshots.com/photo/216729643/217046361zkwMcX) Neil, outhouse with all the modern features


I think that a forum of Dacks history and lore would be awesome. I enjoy knowing the history of the trail/area that I'm hiking. It would be easier if this was in one section as a thread would be too long. The bits and pieces of history in specific forums can be hard to find. I remember coming across some info on the metal loops on Giant's summit, when I wanted to re-read the thread about their surveying history I had to search for 'Giant' and go through a lot of info. Hope this section gets created.

Happy Hiking!

redhawk
12-03-2004, 10:13 AM
It's a done deal. Kevin has created the sub forum and all we need now is for Dick to figure out that he has the skills to be a moderator as well as a historian.

swizzlenutz
12-04-2004, 06:21 PM
I've been interested in the history of the adirondacks as long as I've lived here. I think we should also be devoted mystery busters as well. Maybe we can get some things answered, Like what is that picture of on the barrel shaped piece of cement at the ruins on the way to holmes lake and Why can't I find anything on hell devil dam? Where's all the caves at? Who used to live at the cellar hole on Bennett Lake in hope? What minerals used to be mined here and where are the mines? I would like to start documenting homes and settlements and where they are located on an updated map using my gps. I would like to be able to label each cellar hole as the jones's or the blowers or tennent's instead of "This is site a and b and we don't know anything about the people who lived here!" I think a working knowledge of the people that settled this area would be awesome. I want to find my own roots here as well as those of early adirondack settlers. I wanna know everything and anything about early native american's and military movements and the location of the underground railroad. This is a wonderful place we live and the mysteries are there to be solved. Lets hear more about the mysteries you hikers want solved as well. We might never find out everything we want to know but we may solve a few that interest us all. Sorry this is so long but I think this history and folklore section is an awesome idea. I would love to see a map of french louies haunts and maybe walk the paths that he lived and loved. So much to do and only one lifetime to absorb it all. Jason

Dick
12-04-2004, 06:44 PM
There was a manhunt here in Wells for a man who had murdered someone. He hung in the woods for a couple of years before being caught.

Is this the one?
http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial_killers/predators/robert_garrow/3.html?sect=2

The history of what existed in the valley before they flooded it to create the Great Sacandaga Resevoir, the witch tales!

Perhaps these are of some help?
http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyhamilt/history/conkdam.html
http://www.hrbrrd.com/history.htm
http://www.edinburgny.com/History.html
http://www.edinburgny.com/ReservoirHistory.html

Seneca Ray Stoddard
http://www.chapmanmuseum.org/seneca_ray_stoddard.htm
http://www.chapmanmuseum.org/More_Than_Photography.htm
http://adirondack-books.com/stoddardray.html
http://www.sthubertsisle.com/page149.html
http://americanart.si.edu/collections/exhibits/helios/AmericanPhotographs/obstods01.html
http://americanart.si.edu/collections/exhibits/helios/AmericanPhotographs/obstods02.html
http://www.maineantiquedigest.com/articles/apr02/stod0402.htm
http://www.bhny.com/nystate/ny033.html
http://www.co.warren.ny.us/records/PAGE68.html
http://www.iphotocentral.com/search/result_list.php/256/Stoddard,+Seneca+Ray
http://www.sthubertsisle.com/page150.html

French Louie:
http://adirondack-books.com/harveydunham.html
http://sti2799y.seamlesstech.com/Templates/frmTemplateE.asp?CatalogID=571&Zoom=Yes&SubFolderId=51

Does this help?

swizzlenutz
12-04-2004, 06:55 PM
A wealth of knowledge from a variety of people with a variety of interest. :dance:

Dick
12-04-2004, 07:01 PM
Kevin, Redhawk wanted a sub-forum on the quality of the various privies in the Adirondacks!
Hawk, why don't you start a thread on that. Something like: What's the smelliest, most disgusting privie you know of?

In addition to the silly picture I posted, there really is only one site you need:

http://jldr.com/index.html

redhawk
12-04-2004, 07:04 PM
That manhunt story is interesting, but it's not the one I'm talking about.

To my understanding, the crimes did not occur in Wells but somewhere further North.

Evidently while they were looking elsewhere, the Killer (who was local to the Adk's) was camped in the woods in Wells, I think for a couple of years!

I can't believe I have never heard mention of the incidents in that article you posted the link to! I'll have to see if I can locate some of the places he was at!

It's wondeful being surrounded by history. One of these days, around a campfire, I'll relate my meeting with the spirit of James Butler Hickock (aka Wild Bill), in a storage room in Deadwood, SD.

Dick
12-04-2004, 07:14 PM
In addition to the silly picture I posted, there really is only one site you need:

http://jldr.com/index.html

As some of you who have hiked with me know, Joanne rates ADK privies on the "JO" scale (1-10). I can't remember all of the ratings, but we've come across some doozies. I think the one at Scott's Clearing is right up (down?) there among the smelliest (I would tend to agree with her assessment). She also visited another one in Indian Pass (Henderson lean-to?) that "worked" just fine, but had one minor inconvenience: no walls around the stall! Totally open for viewing!

Dick

redhawk
12-04-2004, 08:12 PM
As some of you who have hiked with me know, Joanne rates ADK privies on the "JO" scale (1-10). I can't remember all of the ratings, but we've come across some doozies. I think the one at Scott's Clearing is right up (down?) there among the smelliest (I would tend to agree with her assessment). She also visited another one in Indian Pass (Henderson lean-to?) that "worked" just fine, but had one minor inconvenience: no walls around the stall! Totally open for viewing!

DickInconvenience? Thats the new patented 360 degree ventilation system that's been adopted!!

And.....................

Are you saying ON THE RECORD that Joanne is privy to privvies?

Dick
12-04-2004, 08:27 PM
Inconvenience? Thats the new patented 360 degree ventilation system that's been adopted!!

Inconvenient for those with a modicum of modesty!


And.....................

Are you saying ON THE RECORD that Joanne is privy to privvies?

Indeed she is, and would be the first to admit it!

Dick
12-04-2004, 09:49 PM
what is that picture of on the barrel shaped piece of cement at the ruins on the way to holmes lake and Why can't I find anything on hell devil dam?

Perhaps Redhawk can help? I think he's been there.

Where's all the caves at?

I'm not sure which caves you're referring to here, but you could check back editions of NRO Northeastern caver:
http://www.caves.org/region/nro/necaver_back.html

I know a couple of cavers with considerable experience in the N.E. and I would be happy to contact them if you give me some more info.

Who used to live at the cellar hole on Bennett Lake in hope?

Not directly relevant (and I don't know the area!), but a possible contact:
http://www.streeter.org/community/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=421

What minerals used to be mined here and where are the mines?

Again, doesn't directly answer your question, but it might be a place of inquiry:
http://www.adirondacklakessurvey.org/alscrpt.asp?alscpond=050182

Re French Louie:

Have you tried: Harvey Dunham's book - Adirondack French Louie: Early Life in the North Woods.

Past trip to the area:
http://www.thebackpacker.com/trailtalk/thread/5462,-1.php

See also:
http://www.wakelydam.com/section1.html
http://www.viewsfromthetop.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-241.html
http://www.caves.org/region/nro/necaver_back.html (February, 02)

Sorry I couldn't be of more help!

Dick

redhawk
12-04-2004, 11:38 PM
I've Bushwhacked into the site of Hell Devil Dam several times from different directions. It's strange because very few of the Natives in Wells know anything about it. My knowledge of it came simply from it being on the Three Ponds Topo. ALl I have been able to find is that it was built by a lumbering company to store and then float logs down Nine Mile Creek to the West branch of the Sacandaga.

I've found several foundations in the Pumpkin Hollow-Creek Road area, as well as in Griffin. Used to be an old Ox Road that went from Griffin to Hadley and Corinth that was used to bring supplies into griffin which was a thriving community until the turn of the 20th century.

As far as the foundations from Pumpkin Hollow down to Hope Falls, I would think that if someone could track down and talk to some Bennets, they might be ble to get some insight. (Bennet Lake, Bennet Road, etc)

Dick
12-05-2004, 07:31 AM
I've Bushwhacked into the site of Hell Devil Dam several times from different directions. It's strange because very few of the Natives in Wells know anything about it. My knowledge of it came simply from it being on the Three Ponds Topo. ALl I have been able to find is that it was built by a lumbering company to store and then float logs down Nine Mile Creek to the West branch of the Sacandaga.

I've found several foundations in the Pumpkin Hollow-Creek Road area, as well as in Griffin. Used to be an old Ox Road that went from Griffin to Hadley and Corinth that was used to bring supplies into griffin which was a thriving community until the turn of the 20th century.

As far as the foundations from Pumpkin Hollow down to Hope Falls, I would think that if someone could track down and talk to some Bennets, they might be ble to get some insight. (Bennet Lake, Bennet Road, etc)

As for Bennett (spelled with two 'n's), unfortunately it's a common name, but you might be able to contact Rudy Peters, former Town Historian for Hope (lives on Rt. 30). Here is a newspaper article about the area:

http://www.uticaod.com/news/specialreports/2004adk/archive_week02.htm

Redhawk mentioned a road to Hadley. For what it's worth, there are the Bennett's Riding Stables in Luzerne, NY, and Chuck Bennett is a co-author of McMartin's Discover the Eastern Adirondacks.

Dick

Wldrns
12-13-2004, 07:58 AM
Perhaps Redhawk can help? I think he's been there.
I'm not sure which caves you're referring to here, but you could check back editions of NRO Northeastern caver:
http://www.caves.org/region/nro/necaver_back.html
I know a couple of cavers with considerable experience in the N.E. and I would be happy to contact them if you give me some more info.

Oh wow.... boy does seeing some of those referrenced articles on the nro website bring back memories. I was part of the original Stony Brook crew to push way back into the Skull and McFails systems along with legendary Mike Queen and Rich Palmer. There is no feeling quite like passing "through the looking glass" hidden opening to become the first humans to ever see miles of beautiful untouched new passage. We used Knox and Clarksville as "training" caves for new outing club members with their colorful passage names (the gunbarrel, the lemon squeeze, alabaster room, the flush, ...). Does anyone here know what "skullites" are? The series of "F" passages? Diving under a siphon? Onesquethaw after a flood? So many caves, so much mud. I still have some of that original mud clinging to my 30 year old bag of caving clothes.

We spent most every weekend during our college days tromping around Schoharie County, tracking down legends and rumors on new and old caves ("sinks by the mulberry bush" was one that drove us nuts). A team of us spent weeks in the Carlsbad NM and Lincoln Forest area systems with special researcher's permission from the park service. We just missed discovering now famous pristine Lechuguilla Cave by a nose.

Dick, were you active in the NY caves a number of years back?

Dick
12-13-2004, 08:32 AM
Dick, were you active in the NY caves a number of years back?
Not at all - no caver, I! But as I mentioned, "some of my best friends are cavers" and are knowledgeable about the area. Also, one of my sons has been in some of the ones you mention. I know he's mentioned the "gunbarrel" and everytime he talks about doing it, it gives me the willies!

I think I recall some caving discussion on this forum in the past. Perhaps it was Jeff?

Dick

redhawk
12-13-2004, 03:59 PM
Incidently I know of the cave at Kunjamunk.

For the record: Hawks Soar, Hawks Swoop, Hawks Glide, Hawks Fly, Hawks Roost Hawks Perch.

Hawks do not "spelunk"

Hawks spend all their time above ground....

eghaley
09-19-2005, 08:05 PM
Once in a while I come across in print the folklore of a vein of silver (sometimes referred to a silver mine) somewhere near Street and Nye mountains. With all the herdpaths crisscrossing the area I wonder if anyone has come upon the place. Or has anyone actually gone looking for it? Might be fun to stumble onto it and jot down the coordinates (excuse me, add the waypoint).

RonandJon
09-23-2005, 09:35 AM
Not at all - no caver, I! But as I mentioned, "some of my best friends are cavers" and are knowledgeable about the area. Also, one of my sons has been in some of the ones you mention. I know he's mentioned the "gunbarrel" and everytime he talks about doing it, it gives me the willies!


Dick

Dick

My son, Jon, attended the Helderberg Workshop for 2 summer while growing up and took the spelunking class. I remember the incredible muddy clothes he came home with every day, and Kathy's arduous attempts to get them clean. I think at the end of the week or two weeks she just gave up and tossed them.

I remember him talking about the gun barrel, too, and although he thought about it, he did not go through it. Guess it must be quite the tight squeeze. Kudos to your son for accomplishing that.

As for me, I am a little claustrophic and what one doctor treating me for a bad back once described as, "a thick fellow" which means that caves are about the last place I ever want to be. But I sure enjoyed Jon talking about them.

Dick
09-25-2005, 07:39 PM
Dick

My son, Jon, attended the Helderberg Workshop for 2 summer while growing up and took the spelunking class. I remember the incredible muddy clothes he came home with every day, and Kathy's arduous attempts to get them clean. I think at the end of the week or two weeks she just gave up and tossed them.

I remember him talking about the gun barrel, too, and although he thought about it, he did not go through it. Guess it must be quite the tight squeeze. Kudos to your son for accomplishing that.

As for me, I am a little claustrophic and what one doctor treating me for a bad back once described as, "a thick fellow" which means that caves are about the last place I ever want to be. But I sure enjoyed Jon talking about them.

Ron, Dave enjoyed it, but you'll NEVER find me in there. It averages 14" in diameter and is about 50 feet long! Here (http://buer.suoc.org/slides/caving/html/knox_cave_gunbarrel.html) is a picture of the gunbarrel.
And here (http://www.well.com/user/peter/gunbarra.gif)


Dick

swizzlenutz
11-25-2005, 06:02 PM
Does anyone have a source of old maps from the early to mid 1800's of the southern and central adirondacks. I'd like to find roads that don't exist anymore and see how mother nature has taken back what was once borrowed from her. Jason

Dick
11-25-2005, 08:21 PM
Jason, these links don't all go back as far as you want, and may not have the detail you need, but maybe they're of some help. Some places you'll have to call and visit. Others may only be of secondary interest to you. I've been meaning to update and better organize the links on this sub-forum for some time now. I'll make a serious effort to do it over the next couple of weeks. In the meantime, this isn't much, but I hope it's a start.

Dick


http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyhamilt/history/
http://www.sunysb.edu/libmap/nymaps.htm
http://www.apa.state.ny.us/About_Park/history.htm
http://docs.unh.edu/nhtopos/nhtopos.htm
http://www.apa.state.ny.us/gis/index.html
http://www.adkmuseum.org/research/library_services.shtml#maps
http://alabamamaps.ua.edu/historicalmaps/northeast
http://www.roundthebend.com/adirondacks/dackhist.html
http://www.adirondackhistory.org/index.html
http://departments.colgate.edu/envir_stud/old_site2002/Links/adkformat.htm
http://www.adkdesign.com/history.htm

swizzlenutz
12-17-2005, 01:03 PM
Sorry that it took so long to reply. Thanx for all the cool maps and info, Dick. That is very awesome and appreciated. If I don't get on again until after christmas then "MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL" Jason